10 posts tagged “Are you sleeping?”

Circadian rhythms and health: What’s the connection?

Posted 11 months ago by

More than 3,600 PatientsLikeme members are living with insomnia, and 100+ report a circadian rhythm disorder. In October, three researchers won the Nobel Prize for their work examining the relationship between sleep, circadian rhythms and health. So with Daylight Saving Time just behind us, we’re bringing you more info about the “body clock” and how it can affect health.

Let’s back up — what ARE circadian rhythms?

  • Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, or behavioral changes that follow a daily cycle. They’re regulated by biological clocks, which exist in most tissues and organs in the cells.
  • A master clock coordinates all of the biological clocks and contributes to our sleep patterns (it also affects eating habits, body temperature, and other functions).
  • These internal “body clocks” are affected by environmental cues, like sunlight and temperature.

New research making headlines

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to three Americans for their work on circadian rhythms. The Nobel committee said their research was pivotal, because “the misalignment between a person’s lifestyle and the rhythm dictated by an inner timekeeper — jet lag after a trans-Atlantic flight, for example — could affect well-being and over time could contribute to the risks for various diseases.”

What’s the relationship between sleep and circadian rhythms?

  • Circadian rhythms help determine our sleep patterns. The body’s master clock, or SCN, controls the production of melatonin, a hormone that makes you sleepy. It receives information about incoming light from the optic nerves. So when there is less light—like at night—the SCN tells the brain to make more melatonin so you get drowsy.
  • For most adults, the biggest dip in energy happens in the middle of the night (between 2:00am and 4:00am) and just after lunchtime (ever crave a post-lunch nap around 1:00pm to 3:00pm?).
  • When things disrupt your sleep habits, like jet lag, daylight savings time, or a late night, they also disrupt your circadian rhythms, which can leave you feeling more irritable and make it harder to concentrate.
  • People who work rotating or shift schedules (nurses, law enforcement, etc.) are most at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Having an irregular schedule can wreak havoc on circadian rhythms.
  • All caught up on sleep? You won’t feel the dips and rises of your circadian rhythms as strongly. When you’re sleep-deprived, you may notice bigger swings of sleepiness and alertness.

How can it impact health and chronic illness?

  • Circadian rhythms influence short term memory, creativity and learning performance, weight gain/loss and your immune system.
  • Lack of sleep affects levels of metabolic hormones that regulate satiety and hunger. When you’re sleep deprived, your body decreases production of leptin, the hormone that tells your brain you’re satisfied, and increases ghrelin, a hormone that triggers hunger.
  • Disrupted circadian rhythms and lack of sleep are associated with diabetes, depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder — and can negatively affect many chronic illnesses, including Parkinson disease, Alzheimer’s, MS, gastrointestinal tract disorders and kidney disease.

Think your circadian rhythms might be out of whack?

  • Try minimizing your screen time with electronics that mimic daylight (laptops, TV’s, cell phones, portable game consoles, etc.). And if possible, try to maintain a regular schedule when it comes to sleep, wake and meal times.
  • If you’re having trouble sleeping, feeling tired often or noticing any other symptoms, talk to your doctor.

How are you sleeping? Join PatientsLikeMe to connect with and learn from nearly 3,600 members with insomnia and share how your condition affects your sleep and circadian rhythm in the forum.

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Throwback Thursday: Are you sleeping?

Posted July 9th, 2015 by

It’s time for another Throwback Thursday, and today, we’re rewinding back to the summer of 2013, when the staff at PatientsLikeMe shared about how they sleep. Sixty one employees helped kick off the “Are you sleeping?” campaign in a quick poll, answering questions about how long and how well they sleep each night. Check out the highlights below:

How well are you sleeping?
All in all, we found that the majority (89%) of our staffers were sleeping OK or better.

How well are you sleeping?

 

On average, how much sleep do you get every night?
Although our Zzzz’s were OK, 61% of respondents were only getting between 5-7 hours a night (and according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, that’s way less than the recommended 7-8 hours for adults).

How many hours?

 

Do you have a problem…
For those who confessed to having sleep troubles, more people said it’s staying asleep that was the issue (77%).

sleep problems

 

What have you tried to help you fall asleep?
When it came to needing sleep aids to catch Zzzz’s, more of our employees turned to solutions like books (60%), lifestyle changes (50%), TV (31%), relaxation (31%) and sex (33%). Some tried over-the-counter interventions (22%), prescriptions (16%) and homeopathic techniques (14%). We also asked what was least helpful, and found ‘watching TV’ topped that list.

Tried to fall asleep

 

Since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, do you…
And last but not least, since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, only a handful had changes in their sleep, with 13 people saying they slept less (23%), and surprisingly, 5 (8%) actually slept more.

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If you’ve been struggling with sleep, read what PatientsLikeMe members Lori (living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) and Marcia (living with multiple sclerosis) had to say about their insomnia. And don’t forget to reach out to the community in the Sleep Issues forum on PatientsLikeMe – over 40,000 members are sharing about everything related to their sleep.

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