12 posts tagged “health 2.0”

Join the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s $200,000 Developer Challenge!

Posted December 21st, 2012 by

Can a game app lead to better health?  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation thinks so.  They’ve announced a competition challenging developers to create game apps that “generate useful health care data to improve health and health care.”

Learn More About the Developer Challenge

The competition will be conducted in two phases. Phase One is an “open ideation phase” where interested developer teams can submit app concepts. From there, the top five teams will be awarded $5,000 to build upon their initial proposals and create working game apps.

What’s at stake?  The developer of the winning game app receives $100,000, while second and third place winners earn $50,000 and $25,000, respectively.  Winners will be announced in September 2013, with the first place winner honored at the Health 2.0 7th Annual Fall Conference.

The deadline for submission is February 22, 2013.  Learn more and register for the challenge here.


PatientsLikeMe at Health 2.0: Paths to Insight

Posted November 15th, 2010 by

Last month, I spoke once again at the Health 2.0 conference in San Francisco.  The video of my presentation is now online.  Here’s a snapshot of what I covered in the 6-minute talk:

  • The wealth of data shared in a PatientsLikeMe treatment reports (e.g., what fibromyalgia patients are sharing about Cymbalta and Lyrica)
  • A suite analytical tools we have to drill down on this underlying data, such as
    • PatientsLikeMeLandscapeTM – a tool to learn more from what patients like you are talking about in the forum.
    • PatientsLikeMeListenTM – a sentiment analysis of keywords in those forum conversations
    • PatientsLikeMeInsightsTM – our query engine that dives deeper into the data (e.g., weight gain in Cymbalta/Lyrica patients)

As I note in my presentation, there are a lot of caveats to what I have up on the screen.  We as an organization believe in being careful about throwing terms around like “evidence.”  So what you see in this video is not evidence – it’s the first look at some of the data we have to work with and what we can do with it as we continue on our path to create evidence.  With no uncertain terms, though, what you see here is the beginning of the insight we can generate around clinical outcomes of patients and the real-world impact of treatments.

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood