10 posts tagged “effectiveness”

MS research: What’s the latest?

Posted February 23rd, 2018 by

Keeping tabs on the latest MS research isn’t always easy. So, our team of in-house health professionals took a closer look into some of the treatments in the research pipeline for people living with MS. Most of these treatments are in the final phase of clinical development — phase III clinical trials. In this phase, researchers compare the safety and effectiveness of the new treatment against the current standard treatment.

Check out the roundup:

  1. Ozanimod – An oral treatment in phase III clinical trials with the potential to reduce relapses and prevent neurological damage. Ozanimod is reported to work like Gilenya (fingolimod) but with some potential for fewer side effects. A new drug application for ozanimod was submitted to the FDA in December 2017. This application is seeking approval for the use of this agent to treat relapsing multiple sclerosis. It is possible that an FDA decision could be made on this application in the second half of 2018.
  2. Ponesimod – An oral treatment in phase III clinical trials that prevents immune cells from damaging myelin that insulates nerve-cells in patients with MS. A new drug application for Ponesimod is possible within the next couple of years.
  3. Siponimod – Similar to Ozanimod, Siponimod is an oral treatment in phase III clinical trials that may reduce risk of relapse and disease progression. With a new drug application in the next year or two, the treatment has the potential for approval and launch 6-12 months later.
  4. ALKS 8700 – This oral treatment (currently in phase III clinical trials) is a slightly different formulation of Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) but, according to Alkermes, has fewer gastrointestinal side effects. With a new drug application in 2018, the treatment could be available 6-12 months later.

In other treatment news:

Laquinimod – You might recognize the name because initially, it showed some promise. More recently it’s performed poorly in clinical trials. Laquinimod is still being developed but in Phase II studies (vs. Phase III which is the final phase of clinical development), which could mean it’s at least a couple years away.

Looking for more info on research and treatments? Join the community today to learn more and connect with more than 60,000 members living with MS.

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Life with Parkinson’s Disease: What We’ve Learned

Posted December 15th, 2011 by

On Tuesday, our interview with blogger Steve Ploussard of “Attitude & Fitness Wins” revealed how one person is managing his Parkinson’s disease (PD).  Today we take a closer look at this progressive neurological condition using the data and experiences shared by our 5,920 PD members.

Age at Which Patients Experienced Their First Parkinson's Symptom

Taking a look at the makeup of our PD community, 52% are male, and 48% are female.  More than 98% identify PD as their primary condition, and just shy of 20% report experiencing their first symptom between the ages of 50 and 59.  Others report experiencing their first symptom anywhere from adolescence to their seventies.  (See the chart for a complete breakdown.)  What exactly are the symptoms of this condition?  Some of the most commonly reported include stiffness/spasticity, slowness, sexual dysfunction, memory problems, excessive daytime drowsiness and constipation.

As Steve’s interview revealed, Carbidopa-Levodopa (Sinemet) is one of the most commonly prescribed treatments for PD as it helps to control tremors, one of the most visible manifestations of the disease, and other movement dysfunctions.  Currently, more than 1,698 members report taking this medication, and 300+ of them have submitted Sinemet treatment evaluations, which review the drug’s effectiveness, side effects, dosage, cost and more.   Here’s what one patient writes about Sinemet on her evaluation:  “I notice my leg limp and motivation to walk improves dramatically when it kicks in. The tremor is much less.

Some of the Most Commonly Reported Treatments for Parkinson's, As Reported by PatientsLikeMe Members

Other commonly reported PD treatments include prescription medications such as Ropinirole (Requip), Pramipexole (Mirapex), Rasagiline (Azilect) and Amantadine; OTC supplements such as CoQ10; and surgical procedures such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).  Click on the treatment name to see the data we’ve amassed for each, including hundreds of treatment evaluations submitted by our patients.

This is just a sample of the wealth of experience and data to be found at PatientsLikeMe.  Dive in today to learn more about PD.