3 posts tagged “clinical trial”

PatientsLikeMe Launches Virtual Trial for ALS Patients

Posted October 25th, 2016 by

Study With Major Academic Medical Center to Evaluate the Potential of the Soy Peptide Lunasin to Reverse ALS Symptoms


DURHAM, N.C., October 25, 2016—PatientsLikeMe and The Duke ALS Clinic have just completed enrollment in a virtual trial designed to test whether Lunasin, a peptide found in soy and some cereal grains, is helpful or harmful to patients living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The Lunasin Virtual Trial is the first study of the supplement in ALS patients and follows a review analyzing its potential to reverse ALS in ALSUntangled, a website for clinicians, patients and researchers to explore alternative treatments.

Duke ALS Clinic Director and ALSUntangled Founder Richard Bedlack, MD, said he first heard about Lunasin’s potential from Mike McDuff, an ALS patient who took the supplement and experienced dramatic improvements in speech, swallowing and limb strength.

“I reviewed Mike’s records and reports, and both his diagnosis and his improvements appeared real,” Bedlack said. “Of course, Mike might have an ALS mimic we don’t know how to test for, or his body may have found a way to beat ALS independent of treatment. But there is one more possibility: his Lunasin regimen might have actually worked. I was compelled to design a study to treat other ALS patients with the same regimen to test if anyone else improves.”

As part of the trial, 50 participants will make three in-person visits to the Duke ALS clinic to measure the supplement’s impact over the course of the year-long study. They will also complete virtual check-ins as members of PatientsLikeMe every 30 days to update their weight, complete an evaluation of their Lunasin regimen, and complete the ALS Functional Rating Scale (Revised, ALSFRS-R), a widely-used patient-reported outcome developed by PatientsLikeMe that allows patients to see their disease progression visually and in context.

Bedlack said the study’s design is patient-centric and eliminates many of the frustrations patients say are inherent in traditional clinical trials. The design also likely contributed to what Bedlack calls the fastest enrollment of any trial in ALS history: the virtual trial took just over five months to fill.

“There are no placebos, and we made the inclusion criteria very broad so that even ALS patients who can’t qualify for other studies due to their long disease duration or use of a ventilator can qualify,” Bedlack said. “We’re also limiting the burden on the participants by helping them check in online from the comfort of home. And we’ve already published the protocol on our ALS Reversals website. We’re taking a completely open approach so that anyone, anywhere, can see the details of what we’re testing and learn more about whether this is helpful, harmful, or does nothing at all. I think all of these factors made the trial very attractive to ALS patients.”

PatientsLikeMe began as a website for people living with ALS to openly share their experiences with each other and study alternative and off-label treatments. Vice President of Innovation Paul Wicks, PhD, said the company’s research focus gave ALS patients a science-based platform to monitor themselves, get ideas from other patients, and play a more active role in their own healthcare. That focus has also helped the company produce more than 30 published research studies on the condition, including a 2011 observational study in Nature Biotechnology that refuted the results of a 2008 clinical trial on the efficacy of lithium carbonate on ALS. More recently the company has worked with Bedlack to study the frequency of ALS plateaus and reversals. Findings from that study were recently published online and in the March 2016 print edition of the journal Neurology.

Anyone taking Lunasin outside of the Lunasin Virtual Trial is invited to separately track their experiences on PatientsLikeMe at www.patientslikeme.com.

ALS is a degenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Symptoms include progressive weakness, atrophy, fasciculation, dysphagia, and eventual paralysis of respiratory function.

Study Design Methodology

The Lunasin Virtual Trial is a 12-month, widely inclusive, largely virtual, single-center, open-label pilot trial utilizing a historical control group. Participants will be asked to sign in or register for an account on www.patientslikeme.com with the help of the study coordinator and will be given a welcome packet that includes a one sheet description of the study, a checkup checklist, and the first month of a total 12-month supply of Lunasin. User IDs associated with participants’ PatientsLikeMe account will be recorded by the study coordinator and shared with study staff at PatientsLikeMe. After the initial in-clinic visit, participants will be asked to enter the following data online: weight, Lunasin study drug regimen evaluation, and their ALSFRS-R score.

About PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services, and care. With more than 400,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 80 research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact                                                                                                Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
+1.781.492.1039


A new precision medicine program for ALS patients

Posted May 4th, 2016 by

Last month, we talked about precision medicine and what it could mean for psychiatry. What’s precision medicine again? It’s a relatively new way of preventing and treating illnesses that takes into consideration people’s genetic makeup, environment and lifestyle.1

Today — just in time for ALS Awareness Month — we’re digging deeper into how it can be used to treat ALS. Our partners at the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) run the world’s first and largest precision medicine program in ALS, and here’s what it’s all about…

How the program works

The goal of ALS TDI’s program is to identify subgroups of ALS and possible treatments for them using a patient’s personal data, genomics and iPS cell technology … and then test the most effective treatments in a clinical trial.2 Check out the graphic below for an overview of what program participants can expect (tap to make the image larger).

 

 

If you’re living with ALS, head over to the forum and tell us what you think about using precision medicine in ALS care — would you participate in a program like ALSTDI’s? Add your voice and let’s learn more, together.

 

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.

 

1 www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine

2http://www.alstdi.org/precision-medicine-program/


Share Your Experiences with Euphytose

Posted April 26th, 2011 by

Available without a prescription in France, Euphytose is an herbal treatment for anxiety and depression that contains six plant extracts:  Hawthorn, Passionflower, Valerian, Ballota foetida, Cola nitida and Guarana (Paullinia cupana).  The latter is available in France as an over-the-counter anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) agent.

Producing both sedative and stimulant effects, Euphytose combines traditional herbal remedies for anxiety with components that are thought to act on central benzodiazepine receptors.  It had been studied in one short, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 181 adults, with a statistically significant effect found for both reduction in symptoms and clinical response to Euphytose over placebo at the end of the trial.  In terms of safety, it was well-tolerated in the study with no difference in the number of adverse effects compared with placebo – and no serious adverse effects.

At PatientsLikeMe, where more than 125,000 patients are sharing their experiences with all types of treatments, two patients report trying Euphytose.   The reported purposes were “Anxious mood,” “Panic disorder” and “Insomnia.”  Effectiveness was rated as either “Moderate” or “Slight,” while side effects included “Drowsiness” and “Problems concentrating.”  Here’s what one patient with panic disorder wrote on his Euphytose treatment evaluationMakes you a little drowsy, but helps in limiting the effects of expected stressful situations.”

JOIN PATIENTSLIKEME TODAY

Have you taken Euphytose or another over-the-counter remedy for anxiety and depression?  Join PatientsLikeMe and add your experiences to our growing body of knowledge.  Then, stay to exchange advice and support, research common treatments and learn from other patients like you.

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