Pulmonary fibrosis

PF Awareness Month

September is Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month, and in honor of that, we’re rounding up what members of the PatientsLikeMe community have shared about pulmonary fibrosis on our blog. First off, for those who don’t know – what is pulmonary fibrosis (PF)? It’s a chronic, progressive scarring or thickening of the lungs, which makes it difficult for oxygen to transfer from your lungs into your bloodstream. It may be caused by certain medications, environmental exposures or underlying diseases of the autoimmune system (such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus or scleroderma). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the cause of which is still unknown, is the type of PF most people might’ve heard of, but there are many other forms of PF, such as sarcoidosis and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Now let’s take a look back at some blog posts about PF. In 2013, member Ian shared about his journey from having “stiff lungs” and getting diagnosed with IPF to undergoing a lung transplant. “I was bloody determined to have a transplant,” he said. Read more here. In 2014, member John_R discussed his adjustment to his “new normal” of living with IPF and using supplemental oxygen. “My oxygen use was quickly accepted at work,” he said. “There were a couple of double takes when people …

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PatientsLikeMe Welcomes Next Patient Team of Advisors

  CAMBRIDGE, Mass, November 14, 2016—PatientsLikeMe has named 11 members to its patients-only 2016–2017 Team of Advisors, which this year will focus on elevating the patient voice. Team members will share their stories, participate in community initiatives, and give real world perspectives to our industry and research partners. “Each year, our Team of Advisors has proven an invaluable source of inspiration and support for the PatientsLikeMe community,” said PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter. “We look forward to learning from this year’s team as we partner to identify how we can change healthcare for the better.” More than 500 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. They are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), autonomic neuropathy, bipolar disorder, epilepsy, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lung cancer, lupus, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease. Members named to the team include: Cris Simon, Gary Rafaloff, Ginny Emerson, Glenda Rouland, Hetlena Johnson, Jacquie Toth, Jim Seaton, John Blackshear, Kimberly Hartmann, Laura Sanscartier and Lindsay Washington. John Blackshear is living with multiple sclerosis (MS) and looks forward to the opportunity to share his story with others, and …

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Global PF Awareness Month: An interview with Dr. Cosgrove from the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

September is Global PF Awareness month, and a few weeks ago,  members of the PatientsLikeMe PF community helped us kick it off by sharing in their own words what it’s like to live with this condition. The month is winding down now, so we caught up with our partners at the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) to learn more about the latest research as well as a new national registry for PF patients. Below, check out our recent interview with Dr. Gregory Cosgrove, Chief Medical Officer at the PFF, and see what he has to say about the future of PF treatment. Tell us a little about the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation— how did you get started with it? I feel very fortunate to be a part of a team of dedicated medical experts, staff, and volunteers who devote their time and effort to advancing the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation’s (PFF) mission. Two brothers, Albert Rose and Michael Rosenzweig, PhD, founded the PFF in 2000 after losing their beloved sister Claire to PF. Both brothers were also diagnosed with the disease and subsequently passed away. Their vision and dedication continues to inspire us to support the Foundation’s mission to mobilize people and resources to provide access to …

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“You may not like it, but make the MOST of it.” – An interview with IPF member Nikki

When Nikki (Nimiha) was diagnosed with IPF in 2010, she was already a survivor of both ovarian cancer and a heart attack. Staying positive and up-to-date on new information is now this retired RN’s best defense – and she’s been sharing it with her IPF family on PatientsLikeMe since March. We had the chance to connect with her recently, and here’s what we learned … 1. Tell us about your life. What are your hobbies and interests? How do you most enjoy spending your time? I was born 71 years ago in a town named Escondido, in Ca. My mother had been a Wave in the Navy in Washington, D.C. where she met my father, a career Marine. It was war time and he was transferred to Camp Pendleton Marine base in Oceanside, where he was immediately sent overseas to fight. I was an only child with no family living close by so my Mother and I were very close. My father went up through the ranks and was up for Brigadier General, and was honored to take over training the 7th Marines at Camp Pendleton in 1962. Two weeks later he died of a heart attack and my mother …

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Your data doing good: IPF treatment experiences

Every minute of every day, people are sharing their health data on PatientsLikeMe. Some of you are focused on tracking how you’re doing over time. Many want to make sure the next person diagnosed can learn from your experience. All are contributing to the greater good, because what you share helps researchers see what patients really need. During #24DaysofGiving, we’re highlighting some of the most important things we’ve learned from data that members like you have selflessly shared, and all the good your data donations are doing. Every year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves new medications that can help people living with life-changing conditions. But with new treatments come new questions. And that’s exactly what happened at the end of 2014 for people living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). IPF is a rare condition that causes scarring in deep lung tissue over time and has no cause or cure, and before October 2014 no available treatment. That’s when two FDA-approved medications for the condition became available, simultaneously. They had the potential to make a difference in the lives of IPF patients, but how could they learn which medication might be right for them? If they started taking one …

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Let the world know about pulmonary fibrosis

On Rare Disease Day back in February 2013, we announced our partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim to help enhance the online idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) community. And by September 7th that same year, the community had grown to just over 1,000 people. Today, on the next edition of Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, the community stands 2,500+ members strong, making it the largest online gathering of IPF patients anywhere in the world. In just a year, the community has almost tripled in size, and everyone is sharing about their experiences so that other patients, doctors and researchers can learn more about life with IPF. But what exactly is IPF? Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a medical condition that causes lung tissue to thicken, stiffen and scar over a period of time, and “idiopathic” means “no known cause.” According to the Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis, there are over 100,000 Americans living with IPF at any given time, and an estimated 40,000 will die from the condition every year. And besides a complete lung transplant, there is no known cure for IPF.1 Today, the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) is encouraging everyone to educate, share, fundraise and start conversations about IPF. You can learn more about …

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“No oxygen.” PatientsLikeMe member Lori shares about life after surviving idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

It’s crazy to think how fast things can happen. The last time we talked with Lori, she was telling us about life on the lung transplant list and playing what she called “the waiting waltz.” And now – everything has changed. Just two weeks after we posted her third interview on the PatientsLikeMe blog in mid April, Lori got the call – they had a set of lungs for her. We caught up with Lori one more time, and fifteen weeks post transplant, she’s nothing but smiles. Check out what she had to share and don’t forget to follow Lori on her own blog called Reality Gasps. (Thank you Lori for being so open about your experiences with IPF!)     What was your reaction when you got ‘the call?’ You mention a whole range of emotions on your blog. The call took me completely by surprise. I’d been admitted to the hospital a week earlier because we just couldn’t meet my oxygen needs at home any more. I was literally 10-minutes away from starting a procedure to suppress my antibodies (to help increase my somewhat slim chances of finding a match) when the nurse walked in and told me …

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The Patient Voice- PF member Bryan shares his story

  Since we announced #dataforgood back in March, many PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about why they donate their own health experiences. Becca (fibromyalgia) and Ed (Parkinson’s) already shared their stories, and now we’re hearing from Bryan, an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) member. Check out his video above. Miss Becca or Ed’s? Watch them here. Share this post on twitter and help spread #dataforgood.

“Gee, doc, ya think?” – Barbara speaks about her diagnosis and life with IPF

PatientsLikeMe member Barbara (CatLady51) recently shared about her journey with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in an interview with us, and she spoke about everything from the importance of taking ownership of managing her condition to how she hopes to “turn on the light bulb” by donating her personal health data. Read her full interview about living with IPF below. Some PF members report having difficulty finding a diagnosis – was this the case with you? What was your experience like?  My journey started back in 2005, when after my first chest cold that winter, I was left with severe coughing spells and shortness of breath. An earlier chest x-ray didn’t indicate any issues, so I was referred to a local community-based respirologist (what we call a pulmonologist here in Canada) who wasn’t concerned with my PFT results. I also had a complete cardiovascular workup, again with no alarming results. Then, in 2008, I had another chest cold. Growing up in a family of smokers and being the only non-smoker, I seemed to have managed to miss having chest colds, but 2005 and 2008 were definite exceptions. Again, a normal x-ray, another visit to the respirologist and another PFT that didn’t …

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Patients as Partners: The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale questionnaire results

Back at the beginning of April, we launched a new blog series called Patients as Partners that highlights the results and feedback PatientsLikeMe members give to questionnaires on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. This time around, we’re sharing the results of the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS), a health measure that looks at how confident people are in managing their own conditions. More than 1,500 members from 9 different condition communities on PatientsLikeMe took part. They worked with our research partner Ken Wallston from Vanderbilt University to make the tool the best it can be. (Thank you to everyone that participated! This is your data doing good.) Check out the PMCSMS results and keep your eyes peeled for more ORE questionnaire results as we continue the series on the blog. What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

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