MSA

Wrapping up Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms

Here’s a question we asked last year – how do you explain multiple sclerosis to those who don’t understand? And here are a few answers: “I’m burnt alive every day.” “A single bead of sweat can bring me to my knees.” “I can be struck down in just seconds.” Over the past year, we’ve been featuring quotes, pictures and videos from the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about visualizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. We’ve covered nine symptoms: blurred vision, pain, hot and cold, spasticity, dizziness, fatigue, brain fog, balance and numbness. If you missed anything, watch the video below for a full recap. While there may be no more Seeing [MS] photographs, there will always be more symptoms, experiences and knowledge to share to help raise awareness for all things MS. There are more than 39,000 people living with MS on PatientsLikeMe, and many have contributed their own symptoms to the Seeing [MS] forum thread. If you’ve been diagnosed with MS, visit the community today. And a very special thanks to the patients and photographers whose hard work made Seeing [MS] possible.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – numbness

“When I woke up, my hands were gone.” That’s how Adriana Grasso described the numbness she experiences as part of her MS. It’s so severe that she doesn’t even know what it feels like to hold someone’s hand. As she says, “A simple thing that we take for granted – touch – it’s gone, and there is a barrier there.” Listen to Adriana speak about her symptom below: You are now seeing numbness Photographed by Nicholas Walton-Healey Inspired by Adriana Grasso’s invisible symptoms Adriana worked with photographer Nicholas Walton-Healey to portray her numbness in a picture and video. Their work is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – balance

Describing her loss of stability and balance is difficult for Carol Cooke. One moment, she might be walking, and the next, she’ll fall to the ground. As she says, “I just want to get up and keep going,” but that’s not possible due to the symptoms of her multiple sclerosis (MS). Listen to Carol speak about her MS below: You are now seeing balance Photographed by Andreas Smetana Inspired by Carol Cooke’s invisible symptoms To help others understand this, she worked with photographer Andreas Smetana to portray her MS symptom in the picture above. Her video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – brain fog

Australian Jessica Anderson has been living with multiple sclerosis since she was 12 years old, and she says brain fog is the scariest symptom she experiences, especially not being able to gather and make sense of her own thoughts. During her worst moments, she can barely focus on a thought for more than 30 seconds. Listen to Jessica speak about her symptoms below.   You are now seeing brain fog Photographed by Sara Orme Inspired by Jessica Anderson’s invisible symptoms Jessica and New Zealand photographer Sara Orme worked together to visualize Jessica’s brain fog, and her video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – fatigue

“It’s like I’m deflated. I don’t feel like doing anything.” That’s how Darcy McCann says he feels on most days. He’s a young Australian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis [MS] at the age of 10, and his most debilitating symptom is fatigue, which comes and goes as a result of his nerves being constantly under siege.   You are now seeing fatigue Photographed by Juliet Taylor Inspired by Darcy McCann’s invisible symptoms Darcy worked with award-winning photographer Juliet Taylor to capture how he feels when enduring bouts of fatigue. His video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – dizziness

Lyn Petruccelli is living with multiple sclerosis, and she fights random waves of vertigo and dizziness that can strike her at any moment. Sometimes, the feelings are so strong, she can’t even get out of bed. As Lyn says, “I can’t see it coming, and that makes it hard to fight.”1   You are now seeing dizziness Photographed by Louis Petruccelli Inspired by Lyn Petruccelli’s invisible symptoms Lyn’s husband Louis is an accomplished photographer, and they worked together to visually portray what it’s like to live with the possibility of dizziness every day. Their photograph is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS. 1 http://www.seeingms.com.au/ms-stories

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – spasticity

Australian comedian and public speaker Tim Ferguson said it the best – “Seeing [MS] is all about helping everybody, in society, right across the world, get their heads around this mysterious and sometimes scary condition.” He’s living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and he spoke about his spasticity in the video below.   You are now seeing spasticity Photographed by Matt Hoyle Inspired by Tim Ferguson’s invisible symptoms He worked with photographer Matt Hoyle to visualize his spasticity as part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign. It’s all about shining a light on the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition – check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – pain

“I’m burnt alive every day.” That’s how Stephen Papadopoulos, an Australian living with multiple sclerosis (MS), describes the level of pain he experiences on a daily basis. Pain is the second of nine symptoms portrayed in the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] awareness campaign, and Stephen details his experience in the video below:   You are now seeing pain Photographed by Garth Oriander Inspired by Stephen Papadopoulos’ invisible symptom   We’re highlighting pain this month in an effort to reveal the invisible side of living with MS. You can also read other posts on pain – of particular note, Tam’s story about her private, intense pain. Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Recognizing Multiple System Atrophy (MSA Parkinson)

In observing Rare Disease Day at the end of February, we talked how there are 7,000+ conditions that are categorized as rare diseases due to their lower prevalence (less than 200,000 people in the US).  Today we’d like to spotlight one of these lesser-known conditions:  multiple system atrophy (MSA), which affects 536 PatientsLikeMe members and approximately 50,000 Americans. There are no celebrities with MSA, nor is there a high-profile nonprofit organization driving awareness of the disease.  Instead, MSA patients have organized themselves through a “Miracles for MSA” Facebook page and determined grassroots efforts.  They’ve also designated March as Multiple System Atrophy Awareness Month.  Their goal?  “We want to reach everyone affected by MSA and have them join us here to make our voices even louder next year.  Together, we can make miracles happen for MSA.” What can you do to help?  Learn about MSA and help spread the word.  Previously known as Shy-Drager Syndrome, MSA affects middle-aged men and women and advances rapidly with a progressive loss of motor skills.  It is very rare for someone to live 15 years with MSA.  One of the common symptoms is stiffness, similar to what’s seen in Parkinson’s disease.  As a result, MSA …

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“A Mile and a Candle” for World MSA Day

Today, October 3rd, is World MSA Day. MSA stands for multiple system atrophy, a degenerative neurological disorder that causes symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease. As a result, it is included in a group of diseases called “Parkinson-plus syndromes,” which have the classical symptoms of Parkinson’s (such as tremor and stiffness) as well as additional physical and mental features. In addition, these diseases typically do not respond to Parkinson’s treatments. The theme for this year’s World MSA Day is “A Mile and a Candle.” All around the globe, MSA activists will be lighting a candle today at 8:00 p.m. local time for one hour. Participants are being asked to light a candle for each person they know who is living with MSA or has been lost to MSA. As candles are lit across every continent, a virtual 24-hour wave of light will be created as it moves from time zone to time zone. In addition, activists will be walking a mile (or more) in honor of MSA, then reporting their mileage on the “A Mile and a Candle Counter Page.” The goal is to tally enough miles from enough participants to equal 24, 901 miles, which is the circumference of the …

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