Mood conditions

9 mental health podcasts worth listening to

Podcasts are an easy (and usually free) way to stay on top of what’s new across a wide variety of topics — they’re kind of like internet radio on demand, and usually broken up into episodes that you can download on your computer, device or phone. Below, we rounded up 9 podcasts focused on mental health that are worth checking out. While podcasts can act as complements to your mental health care plan, they’re not intended to be a substitute for therapy or medication.   Mental Illness Happy Hour   The New York Times described this podcast as a “a safe place in which he [the host] and his guests talk about their fears, addictions and traumatic childhoods.” This is a weekly podcast that features interviews with people from all walks of life and explores mental illness, trauma, addiction and negative thinking.   The Psych Central Show   This weekly podcast takes an in-depth look at topics related to psychology and mental health. Hosts Gabe Howard and Vincent M. Wales discuss everything from online counseling and the toll of texting to dealing with narcissistic coworkers and more.   The Hilarious World of Depression   This podcast aims to tackle the …

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Meet Cyrena from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

  Say hello to Cyrena, another member of your 2015-2016 Team of Advisors. Cyrena is living with bipolar II and lupus, and currently a PhD candidate in pharmacology. Cyrena describes some days with her conditions as “swimming through a vat of molasses” — which makes managing her intensive student workload along with her health a challenge. She believes there is a lack of resources in higher education to support students with chronic illnesses. Still, this hasn’t stopped her from taking control of her health. Below, Cyrena shares how she’s tracked her mood on PatientsLikeMe for over seven years, and how she prepares for every doctor visit to make sure all her questions get answered. What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face? Probably a full 24 hours with no obligations other than to play with my two cats, eat whatever I want, and hang out with my partner all day. What has been your greatest obstacle living with your condition, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges? The greatest obstacle that I have faced living with chronic illness has been getting through …

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“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Edward shares about living with schizoaffective disorder

Meet Edward, a member of the PatientsLikeMe mental health community. He’s been living with schizoaffective disorder since the late 1970s, and over the past 35 years, he’s experienced many symptoms, everything from paranoia and euphoria to insomnia and deep depression. Below, he uses his own words to take you on a journey through his life with schizoaffective disorder, including a detailed account of what happened when he stopped taking his medications and how he has learned to love God through loving others. How it all began: In my early twenty’s in 1977, I was doing GREAT in college, double majoring in Mathematics and Electrical Electronic Engineering and in the top 1% of my class when I started having problems with mental illness. My first symptom was an intense mental anguish as if something broke inside of my head. Then my sleep started to suffer and I would fall asleep in my college classes, which was not at all like me. Then I started having strong mood swings and I became very delusional. I experienced all of this without the use of any drugs or alcohol; in fact I have never used any street drugs or alcohol. Life became HELL and …

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Schizophrenia: Living well and working towards a cure

Today marks the start of Schizophrenia Awareness Week, and what better way to begin than with the story of an inspiring woman who is living with schizophrenia and advocating for better treatments. Dr. Elyn Saks was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a college student. At first she struggled with her diagnosis, and it took a while before she found treatments that worked for her. Ultimately she excelled in her studies and became the Chair Professor of Law at USC’s Gould School of Law. She even won a MacArthur Genius Grant for her work in mental health research and advocacy. Recently, she sat down with Brian Staglin of Brain Waves, a video program sponsored by the International Mental Health Research Organization (IMHRO). Dr. Saks talked about her experience with schizophrenia and her work for the empathic treatment of people with mental illness. Dr. Saks’ story is just one of many. Schizophrenia affects 2.5 million adults in the United States alone, and thousands more have not been officially diagnosed.1 Schizophrenia can be difficult to recognize, as some of the symptoms, like mood swings, impulsive behavior and hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there), are common in other mental health conditions. Schizophrenia may …

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“I am slowly building my self-esteem “ – PatientsLikeMe member SuperChick shares about her journey with PTSD

PatientsLikeMe member SuperChick is a veteran living with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and her story is one of learning to cope with emotions and frustrations. She’s living proof that things can get better – she’s a loving mother of two, has a great husband and is managing several other mental health conditions. Below, she shared about the sexual abuse she experienced while serving in the military and explained how her previous husband physically assaulted her. Superchick also describes the symptoms of her PTSD and how the community on PatientsLikeMe has been “a huge help” to her. Read about her journey below. Note: SuperChick shares about her story of abuse, which may be triggering. Can you speak a little about your PTSD and what led to your diagnosis in 1986? I was originally diagnosed with PTSD after being raped while I was in the military. I believe I was more susceptible because I had been molested as a child and didn’t have good family support or dynamics. I worked through it, but was diagnosed again in 2007 after leaving a severely abusive marriage, where I was raped multiple times and choked at least twice. I was emotionally abused and didn’t …

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Depression Awareness Month- What does it feel like?

Here at PatientsLikeMe, there are thousands of people sharing their experiences with more than a dozen mental health conditions, including 15,000 patients who report major depressive disorder and 1,700 patients who report postpartum depression. What do they have to say? This word cloud has some of the most commonly used phrases on our mental health forum. It gives you a feel of the many emotions, concerns and thoughts that surround the topic of mental health. But the best way to increase awareness and knowledge, we believe, is to learn from real patients. To help show what it’s like to live with depression, we thought we’d share some of our members’ candid answers to the question, “What does your depression feel like?” “My last depressive state felt like I was in a well with no way to get out. I would be near the top, but oops….down I go. I truly felt that I would not be able to pull myself out of this one. I felt hopeless, worthless and so damn stupid, because I could not be like other people, or should say what I think are normal people.” “It feels like living in a glass box. You can see the rest of the world going about life, laughing, bustling …

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Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Dana

Just last month, we announced the coming together of our first-ever, patient-only Team of Advisors – a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members that will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process. So where did we find our 2014 team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions. Over the coming months, we’d like to introduce you to each and every one of them in a new blog series: Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors. First up, Dana. About Dana (aka roulette67) Dana is a poet and screenplay writer living in New Jersey. She is very active in the Mental Health and Behavior forum. She is open to discussing the …

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Food for Thought: September weather and autumn recipes

Around the PatientsLikeMe office in Boston, the leaves are beginning to turn red, yellow, orange and gold, and everyone is starting to bundle up as the weather gets colder. In turn, PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing their favorite fall recipes and some thoughts about how the weather impacts the conditions they live with. Here’s what some have been saying:   “I love fall. Cooler temps, brisk breezes, my favorite earth colors and long-sleeved tops with soft vests. The more clothes I put on, the better I feel. [I made] creamed chicken and peas with garlic toast. One of my favorites I only make when the husband is off visiting family.” -Fibromyalgia member “I love recipes from Real Simple because they tend to be very…ah…simple. This is a crock pot one (yay!) and the potatoes are totally unnecessary if you are avoiding them.” -Mood member “I will be making sautéed Kobach squash w/ onions, broccoli and some Jasmine rice. Spices turmeric, paprika, salt and pepper. Maybe a little scrambled eggs added.” -Fibromyalgia member Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word. And don’t forget to check out our other Food for Thought posts if you missed them.

Dispelling the myths of schizophrenia

May is all about mental health awareness, and we’re continuing the trend by recognizing Schizophrenia Awareness Week (May 19 – 26). Schizophrenia is a chronic neurological condition that affects people’s sensory perceptions and sense of being, and it’s time to dispel the myths about the condition. Here are some myths and facts about schizophrenia from Northeast Ohio Medical University:1 Myth: Everyone who has schizophrenia knows that they have an illness. Fact:  Many people who have schizophrenia wait months, sometimes years, and suffer needlessly before a proper diagnosis is made and treatment begins. Myth: People with schizophrenia are dangerous. Fact: Studies indicate that people receiving treatment for schizophrenia are no more dangerous than the rest of the population. Myth: People with schizophrenia have split or multiple personalities. Fact: Schizophrenia is not a split personality disorder in any way. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) states that schizophrenia can cause extreme paranoia, along with mental changes like hearing voices others cannot, feeling very agitated or talking without making sense.2 Schizophrenia affects men and women equally, and although it’s normally diagnosed in adults over the age of 45, it is also seen in children. There is no cure for the condition, but antipsychotic drugs …

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It’s time to recognize National Anxiety and Depression Week

We already posted about raising awareness for mental health, and now we’re recognizing National Anxiety and Depression Awareness Week (May 5-10). Since 1994, the week has been organized by Freedom from Fear, a national non-profit focused on raising awareness for depression and anxiety. If you haven’t heard much about these two conditions, here are some quick facts from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA):   An estimated 40 million American adults live with anxiety.1 Only one third of these people receive treatment.1 At any time, 3% to 5% of all people are experiencing depression.2 The lifetime risk of depression is about 17%.2 Nearly one-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety.2 According to the ADAA, common anxiety symptoms can range from increased worry and social tension to extreme restlessness or general fatigue, and often, these symptoms can be magnified by depression. Over 17,000 PatientsLikeMe members report being diagnosed with either generalized anxiety or major depression, including almost 7,000 who are living with both conditions. If you’re experiencing anxiety or depression, you’re not alone – you can share your story in the forum and find support on any topic. The PatientsLikeMe mood community is always …

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