3 posts tagged “TED”

PatientsLikeMe’s Paul Wicks Is a TED2013 Fellow

Posted November 14th, 2012 by

PatientsLikeMe Research & Development Director Paul Wicks, PhD

We are thrilled to announce that PatientsLikeMe Research & Development Director Dr. Paul Wicks, PhD, has been named a TED2013 Fellow.  He is one of 20 individuals to be selected from more than 1,200 candidates to attend the TED2013 conference in Long Beach, California, participate in a preconference bootcamp and receive mentoring from the TED community.

If you’re not familiar with it, TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.  It started out as a conference designed to bring together people from Technology, Entertainment and Design (T-E-D) and has since evolved into a global movement for sharing big ideas.  In addition to annual conferences in the US and UK (TEDGlobal), which bring together movers and shakers for inspiring talks of 18 minutes or less, TED sponsors local events (TEDx) and shares many of its videotaped talks via TEDTalks and TEDxTalks. (Among them: a 2009 talk by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder Jamie Heywood, a 2010 talk by Paul Wicks and a 2011 talk by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder Ben Heywood.)

Click Here to Read About the 20 Individuals Selected as TED2013 Fellows

The theme for the TED2013 conference is “The Young. The Wise.  The Undiscovered.”  Accordingly, this year’s class of TED Fellows represents “young innovators from around the globe, all with insightful, bold ideas that have the potential to influence our world.”  Paul is a perfect fit for this mission, having already been named one of the best young innovators under the age of 35 by MIT’s Technology Review as well as their “Humanitarian of the Year” in 2011.  We know he won’t stay “undiscovered” for long!

A big thanks goes to TEDGlobal 2012 Fellow Max Little, who nominated Paul for this prestigious opportunity.  An applied mathematician who is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at MIT, Max is working on a breakthrough technique to monitor – and potentially screen for – Parkinson’s disease through simple voice recordings.  Learn more about Max’s ingenious idea in his June 2012 TEDTalk below and stay tuned for more coverage of this trailblazing researcher in the coming weeks.


Let Patients Help: The Undying Mission of E-Patient Dave

Posted July 18th, 2011 by

“Patients know what patients want to know.”
Dave deBronkart

Bloggerauthor and international keynote speaker Dave deBronkart is a familiar name at PatientsLikeMe, as his writings and health talks tend to strike a chord with us.

You see, “E-Patient Dave,” as he calls himself, has a story that underscores exactly why we founded PatientsLikeMe. After being diagnosed with Stage IV kidney cancer, Dave faced a grave prognosis. He read that the median survival for his condition was just 24 weeks from diagnosis. Then he joined a social network for cancer patients and learned of a treatment called interleukin-2 that most patients never hear about. Happily, this treatment would eventually save his life.

Today, E-Patient Dave is a healthy fellow as well as an outspoken advocate for many things we support. For example, he believes patients are “the most underutilized resource in healthcare,” and that patients should have access to their own medical data. He argues that only with complete data can a patient crack the code on his or her own health situation. As co-sponsors of the Declaration of Health Data Rights in 2009 and proponents of our own unique Openness Philosophy, we wholeheartedly agree.

To learn more about Dave’s remarkable story, as well as his plea to the medical world to “let patients help,” check out his recent TEDx Talk below.  (If you’ve never heard of TED or TEDMED, it’s another concept we support because of how it generates ideas and stories that produce “wow” another core value of our company.  Our Co-Founder Jamie Heywood has even appeared on their stage for his own TEDMED talk.)

Finally, here is a powerful anecdote from E-Patient Dave about how other patients continued to help him throughout treatment.  “The side effects of interleukin-2 are, as the American Cancer Society puts it, ‘often severe and rarely fatal,'” he says.   “That statement left me pretty powerless, so I collected 15 firsthand stories from my patient peers who had the treatment.  And when my side effects hit the first was uncontrollable chills and shaking I knew what is was.  I knew what to expect, and I knew how other patients like me had gotten through it.”