4 posts tagged “sleeping”

Getting out of bed: The “One hour rule” and other tips

Posted March 12th, 2018 by

Does getting out of bed in the morning ever seem like an overwhelming task? You’re not alone. PatientsLikeMe members are talking about it a lot in the mental health forum. Read on to learn what’s worked for others on difficult mornings.

Give yourself no more than an hour

Elyse Raffery, contributor to The Mighty, shared her strategy for the “One Hour Rule” to get out of bed on the days she’d rather not move from beneath the covers:

“Within one hour of waking up, I have to be out of my bed. If I look at the clock when I wake up and it is 9 a.m., by 10 a.m., I cannot still be lying in bed. I am a competitive person, and even some gentle competition with my own brain helps me sometimes.”

Louder alarms, brighter lights and more tips from PatientsLikeMe members

Check out these practical morning tips from other members in the forum:

“I got a much louder alarm. I went back to the classic two bell analog alarm clock… so loud that my cat bolts from the room.”

“Now I have a routine where I get up, turn the light on, and listen to the radio for ten minutes. Then I get out of bed. The ‘light’ is a full-spectrum, really bright light. You might find that turning on bright lights when you get up helps. You can put them on timers, too, so that they light up when your alarm goes off.”

“Write down or think about something you are looking forward to on the next morning/day. Motivate yourself to want to get up by planning a special item for breakfast (cinnamon toast) or wearing a certain shirt you like or planning a half hour of your favorite music with headphones for the first ten minutes. Something that will keep your head on straight.”

Some shared wisdom from around the web:

  • Make small goals: “If you can’t do one thing a day, try one thing every two days, or even one thing every week. A slowly fought battle is still one you can win in the end.”
  • Ask for help: “We’re all human, there are times we can all benefit from support.”
  • If you have a pet: “Pets are also something great to turn to, as they rely on you to care for them, which gives you a sense of responsibility each day.”

Try to get enough sleep the night before

Chronic sleep problems — common in many mental health conditions — can often be part of the issue. According to the Harvard Health Newsletter,

  • Sleep problems affect more than 65% to 90% of adult patients with major depression
  • In bipolar depression, 23% to 78% of patients report that they have trouble getting out of bed
  • Sleep problems are also common in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Here are some strategies for sleeping better (and potentially getting up more easily.) Talk to your doctor about what might work best for you:

  • Exercise can improve sleep, and can help regulate your mood to make mornings easier
  • Maintaining a regular sleep-and-wake schedule, or “sleep training” — staying awake longer so that your sleep is more restful
  • Keeping your bedroom cool and dark, and banishing electronics from the bedroom
  • Meditation and guided imagery, deep breathing, and progressive muscle relaxation ─ alternately tensing and relaxing muscles ─ can reduce anxiety that can ruin sleep and make mornings so hard

Have you tried the “One Hour Rule” or something else to help you get out of bed? Log in or join PatientsLikeMe and jump in the conversation.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Throwback Thursday: Are you sleeping?

Posted July 9th, 2015 by

It’s time for another Throwback Thursday, and today, we’re rewinding back to the summer of 2013, when the staff at PatientsLikeMe shared about how they sleep. Sixty one employees helped kick off the “Are you sleeping?” campaign in a quick poll, answering questions about how long and how well they sleep each night. Check out the highlights below:

How well are you sleeping?
All in all, we found that the majority (89%) of our staffers were sleeping OK or better.

How well are you sleeping?

 

On average, how much sleep do you get every night?
Although our Zzzz’s were OK, 61% of respondents were only getting between 5-7 hours a night (and according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, that’s way less than the recommended 7-8 hours for adults).

How many hours?

 

Do you have a problem…
For those who confessed to having sleep troubles, more people said it’s staying asleep that was the issue (77%).

sleep problems

 

What have you tried to help you fall asleep?
When it came to needing sleep aids to catch Zzzz’s, more of our employees turned to solutions like books (60%), lifestyle changes (50%), TV (31%), relaxation (31%) and sex (33%). Some tried over-the-counter interventions (22%), prescriptions (16%) and homeopathic techniques (14%). We also asked what was least helpful, and found ‘watching TV’ topped that list.

Tried to fall asleep

 

Since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, do you…
And last but not least, since joining the PatientsLikeMe team, only a handful had changes in their sleep, with 13 people saying they slept less (23%), and surprisingly, 5 (8%) actually slept more.

png;base64330e7390aa0ff44e

 

If you’ve been struggling with sleep, read what PatientsLikeMe members Lori (living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) and Marcia (living with multiple sclerosis) had to say about their insomnia. And don’t forget to reach out to the community in the Sleep Issues forum on PatientsLikeMe – over 40,000 members are sharing about everything related to their sleep.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for sleep and insomnia.