2 posts tagged “products and services”

What products help people live better with Parkinson’s disease? A room-by-room round-up

Posted February 21st, 2018 by

Over the years, PatientsLikeMe members living with Parkinson’s disease have discussed a lot of products and ideas for living better with PD. From kitchen knives and eating utensils to shoe horns and shoelaces, we’ve compiled a list of tools you’ve talked about for (almost) every room in the house and many different aspects of life. Check it out, and join the community to chime in with your own favorites.

In the kitchen

  • A “rocker knife,” also known as an “ulu” or a “mezzaluna” knife “works great for chopping/slicing veggies, fruits, cheeses, etc.” and a “large-blade pizza cutter is great for cutting pancakes/waffles very quickly,” one member says
  • With a food chopper, like those sold by The Pampered Chef, “I can chop onions, peppers, garlic in no time,” another member says
  • Others have mentioned weighted utensils and kitchen utensils specifically designed for people with PD
  • Multiple members have also discussed drinking cups with lids and straws (for both cold and hot drinks) to help prevent spills and gagging/choking

In the bathroom

  • Biotene toothpaste or mouthwash “helps with dry mouth caused by meds”
  • A raised toilet seat and a stool at the bathroom counter can be helpful, as well as a walk-in shower, if possible, some members say
  • Another member uses an electric toothbrush, a hand-held shower attachment and a bath bench “that sits w/ 2 legs inside and 2 legs outside the tub… this allows you to sit down and then raise and swing your legs up and over the tub instead of stepping over and risking a fall. [found a health aid supply store/ Lowe’s, etc.]”

In the living room/bedroom

  • A “good power-assisted recliner” (one member prefers this over his adjustable bed)
  • Silk pajamas and/or satin sheets may make it easier to get in and out of bed
  • “A fairly inexpensive bed rail that goes under the mattress and also rests on the floor… It works for turning over in bed and getting in and out of bed,” another member notes

Getting dressed

  • Members have made wardrobe adjustments, like: “Larger, easy wear clothes, a long-handle shoe horn and pre-tied or slip-on shoes, covered hairbands looped through waistband button holes, an old shoe button hook & large paper clips in zipper grips for those days the fingers refuse to work” (Hint: Here’s how the hair elastic/button-hole trick looks… pregnant women also use this hack)
  • “I use elastic shoelaces so I don’t have to tie/untie my shoes,” another member says
  • “I can no longer button my shirts. This has led to me showing up in t-shirts for events that clearly require more. Then my doc suggested MagnaReady shirts – they have magnets that are hidden behind fake buttons and buttonholes. Genius!”

For communication/entertainment

  • “I also use an adaptive pen (Ring-Pen) and Dragon Naturally Speaking,” one member says
  • Although they can be pricey, a Kindle or iPad can be “great for those of us with tremors. Holding a book sometimes seemed impossible.”
  • In terms of even newer gadgets, “Have any of you heard of Alexa or Google Assistant? They are virtual assistants, built in as a part of smart home devices, such as Google Home and Amazon Alexa —both are smart speakers that you can use voice commands to search information or make a call, or ask them to crack a joke… I’m loving it and it becomes my companion of a sort.”

Etc.

  • Many members have talked about using canes, hiking poles, walking sticks or folding canes, which fit in a small bag
  • In a discussion about physical-therapy objects, one member says, “I use a foam stress ball at my desk so my hand has something to do besides tremor,” and others say that exercise balls (for sitting with less back pain) and four-pronged massagers (for working out back/neck soreness) can be helpful
  • And in a thread about living solo with PD, one member says, “I have found invaluable aid with my Rollator [rolling walker with a seat], my extended pole gripper that we’ve seen on t.v. for grabbing stuff way down there on the floor or up in the cabinets… Life Alert alarm is essential.”
  • Overall? “Accept what you cannot do safely!!! Reprioritize what’s important, then simplify and learn patience,” a member advises.

Have any questions or comments about living better with PD? Join today and connect with 20,000+ members with PD.

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Aligning Interests: A PatientsLikeMe Year in Review (Part VII – Business Development)

Posted January 12th, 2011 by

2010 was a strong year for business development at PatientsLikeMe.  Our goal was – and continues to be – to align patients’ needs with industry interests in order to maximize interaction between the two.  Here are a few of our successes and challenges over the year.

Successes

1.  New Partnerships, New Communities

In the first quarter of 2010, PatientsLikeMe launched two communities with corporate partners.  UCB helped us develop our Epilepsy Community, while Novartis partnered with us to create our Transplants Community.  Both communities have grown to more than 3,000 patient members and are now the largest of their kind in the world.

As with all of our partnerships, we made sure the focus is on the patient experience.   For example, what are your perceptions about the medications you take?  How do you see these treatments impacting your quality of life?  Getting quantifiable data on such questions can help our partners understand how they can help patients like you improve your health outcomes.

2.  Enhanced Services for Partners

When we create products and services for our corporate partners, it’s with a single objective:  to amplify the patient voice.  As a result, healthcare companies who wish to improve health outcomes have the information to improve their products and services accordingly.  In 2010, PatientsLikeMe further heightened the voice of patients by enhancing two existing products.

PatientsLikeMeListenTM and PatientsLikeMeLandscapeTM

screen-shot-2011-01-12-at-113913-amThese complementary services help measure both the frequency and sentiment of treatment discussions in our community forums.  In 2010, we added functionality that allows our partners to see a longitudinal comparative view of patient sentiment (using  PatientsLikeMeListenTM) as well as identify discussion topics that are rising within a forum (using PatientsLikeMeLandscapeTM ).  Both products help to elevate patient concerns and bring their importance and relevance to life for industry partners.

Challenges

As a for-profit health company that enables data sharing by patients, we knew we’d face our share of challenges.  2010 was no different.  Many groups, including patients, nonprofits, government and industry, had valid concerns about working with PatientsLikeMe because of our Openness Philosophy.

1.  Guidance on Industry Interaction with Social Media

One of the main (and valid) concerns our industry partners express is that the Food and Drug Administration has yet to deliver clear guidelines on how to interact with social media.  Dipping their collective toes into the social media wave pool is perceived as risky because the FDA levies severe penalties for companies attempting to directly sell to patients.

PatientsLikeMe has taken a leadership role in addressing this concern by further developing our PatientsLikeMeLeadersTM service. After investigating all privacy and regulatory conditions, PatientsLikeMe has created a fully compliant solution for direct industry-patient feedback in an online forum that we moderate.  Now you as patients will be heard directly by those making decisions on what treatments are developed and how they are introduced, while our partners can learn what patients like you want and need – without fear of non-compliance.

2.  Being Open About the Data Scraping Incident

In May 2010, we discovered that a major media monitoring company had created a patient account and automatically downloaded forum posts in order to add data to their sentiment analysis client service.  Not only is that a violation of our User Agreement (“You may not use any robot, spider, scraper, or other automated means to access the Site or content or services provided on the Site for any purposes.”), but it reduces the trust patients have with our site.

We dealt with this challenge openly by disclosing our discovery of this “data scraping incident” the day it occurred.  We sent a message informing all patient members, and about 200 patient members left the site as a result.  In October 2010, The Wall Street Journal included PatientsLikeMe in its special series on the benefits and risks of sharing health information online, with the practice of data scraping highlighted as a risk to patients.  We welcomed this article coverage and continue to engage with other leaders in this ongoing discussion.

Since our PatientsLikeMeListenTM product measures sentiment of discussions in our forums, we reminded our members about this similar service.  We will continue to inform and educate our members about how we conduct business so there are no surprises.

Summary

In 2010, we continued to grow our patient communities and further confirmed that the success of our business lies in aligning patient and industry interests.  In fact, we have recently been cited by the Board of Innovation as one of 10 Business Models That Rocked in 2010.

Because of the sensitivity of sharing health data online, however, we remain upfront, open and transparent about our business practices so that patients like you can be informed participants in your health, medical research and the development of effective treatments.  Happy 2011!

PatientsLikeMe member dwilliams