42 posts tagged “Fibromyalgia”

Meet Lindsay from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

Posted February 9th, 2017 by

 

Meet Lindsay (Shyandspicy), a member of the PatientsLikeMe 2016-2017 Team of Advisors living with bipolar II, fibromyalgia and diabetes. We recently caught up with Lindsay to learn how she finds purpose in her relationships with her family, her faith and helping others. 

Keep reading to get to know her story and how she tackles the obstacles of living with her conditions through research, self-advocacy and connecting with others.

What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face?

There used to be not much that could give me joy or even make me smile. Now I can say one of my biggest joys in life is bringing pride to God and my family and other supportive loved ones. I have put them through a lot of strife and knowing that they recognize my hard work and attempts at trying to correct the past and become a better version of me brings joy. Along with that, I get a smile on my face when I spend time with my son, who is 13 and my little sister, who is 30 years younger than me. Experiencing life again through their eyes has a whole new meaning!

What has been your greatest obstacle living with your conditions, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges?

Stigma and high functional ability are the greatest obstacles. Because people can’t physically notice all my diagnosed illnesses on a daily basis (bipolar II, fibromyalgia, diabetes and other mental health illness) due to me being so highly functional. I have been denied much-needed services such as disability and compassion among others because I can mask how severe I am at times due to societal expectations of being what is normal. Society needs to start to recognize that we all are different and experience some different type of hurts/traumas in our lives but some of us can’t recover as well from those things. That does not make us less than. Instead of shaming us for displaying a need for help, society needs to encourage and applaud the strength in getting help. It starts though with ourselves not feeling embarrassed about our illnesses, whatever they may be, then family and friends and hopefully society.

How would you describe your condition to someone who isn’t living with it and doesn’t understand what it’s like?

This is hard for me to answer because many of my conditions (diabetes, fibromyalgia, mental health illness) are not seen and overlap. The best way to describe I think is that I know I have the potential to do great things, but mentally, physically and emotionally I struggle so hard to achieve this. First, I constantly talk myself into waking up in the morning, moving around, taking medicine, getting dressed, eating, overcoming fears, slowing down on taking on the world, filling out paperwork, and other basic skills that people tend to take for granted. I am a high functioning person so I’ve adapted to societal ways, but physically I’m in constant pain, the kind where every joint, etc., feels like a train has hit me and nothing I can do takes it away. Mentally, I am in constant battle of trying to build myself up while tearing myself down, remember little tasks and trying not to be confused (because I am intelligent and it makes no sense that I can’t remember simple things anymore). Emotionally, I am constantly finding exits, bathrooms, etc. in case I have a “melt down” so I can do it in private. I act cold, inappropriate and ruin relationships because I misunderstand things emotionally. All because I don’t want to be a bother or appear weak.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone newly diagnosed with a chronic condition, what would it be?

Research, research and research. I am a big reader and nerd already, but the one thing that has helped me is knowing what I am talking about when I go into the doctor’s offices. They may not believe you because some doctors are not up on research, but at least I know what tests I should ask for, medicines I should try and treatments to seek. If you can’t get it from a certain doctor, be an advocate for yourself. Just because one doctor says one thing, doesn’t mean it is entirely true. You can always change doctors, hospitals, etc., I never understood that. Another thing is keep track of symptoms, changes, etc. It helps to know when your condition is getting worse or better.

How important has it been to you to find other people with your condition who understand what you’re going through?

Very important. Without finding PatientsLikeMe.com in April 2016, I think my life would have been very different at this point. This site has given me courage, comfort and belonging. That was my major piece missing in my recovery of self, a sense of belonging…and finding non-judgmental and understanding strangers who get it is rare. This site brings everyone together and then some!

Recount a time when you’ve had to advocate for yourself.

I am always having to be a constant advocate for myself with doctors and my state funded insurance. It is SO frustrating and many times I want to give up, but I know no one else is going to do it and something needs to be done. Here is an ironic situation I run into a lot: I have applied for bariatric surgery 5 times. I’ve been denied 5 times due to mental stability, yet I need multiple test services, etc. and when I go to get the prior authorization, I am denied stating I need to just lose weight. Hmmm…interesting. You won’t pay for the surgery, you won’t pay for the coverage to get better sleep to lose weight, but will pay for me to see a doctor at least 5 times a week and 21+ pills a month. I also just had my 7th surgery on my knee. I am going to continue to fight because it makes no sense. Just because I have state insurance and I am overweight does not mean I should get unfair treatment.

How has PatientsLikeMe (or other members of the PatientsLikeMe community) impacted how you cope with your condition?

Because of PatientsLikeMe, I have found a new desire to become a better patient and to be there for other people who are not aware that there is hope for their condition. I started on this site because I was tired of how I was being treated as a patient and I found hope on PatientsLikeMe and comfort with other members. It brought me out of my depression at the time. Any time I talk to someone, (and this was before I was on the Team of Advisors) I would tell them about this site because I felt it was just a great way to not feel alone anymore and to get knowledge. I’m able to cope better knowing that if I am having a bad day other people will be supportive and give well wishes or advice. That is so comforting when you are depressed…just knowing someone in this world cares.

What made you want to join the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors?

I wanted to help other people like others have helped me on this site.

 

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Top Rheumatoid Blogs of 2016

Posted February 2nd, 2017 by

Today is Rheumatoid Awareness Day and this year we wanted to share some of the top rheumatoid arthritis blogs that were included in Healthline’s 16 Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Blogs of 2016 list:

  1. Itis

Stay up-to-date to learn about RA’s long-term effects and practical tips for living with RA. This blogger’s socks help treat the pain of RA and of Raynaud’s, (an autoimmune blood vessel dysfunction that sometimes co-occurs with RA).

2. All Flared Up

This blog is about “living rather than wallowing” with RA. Check in to see how blogger Amanda is learning to understand her body and how it works with RA.

3. Arthritic Chick

Before Arthritic Chick was finally diagnosed with RA, she suffered with pain in her hands, feet and ribs for years. On her blog, she shares the good days, and her bad days with openness, honesty and strength.

4. An Attitude of Gratitude

Julie Faulds’ easygoing blog gives us a peek into her life with her family, thunder-phobic dog — and, her RA and fibromyalgia. Julie chooses an “attitude of gratitude” and her bad days make her good days better and brighter. Always an advocate of finding the positive, she suggests thinking of your RA downtime as a “spa day” instead of a sick day.

5. Carla’s Corner

Carla Kienast’s RA journey has included knee, hip, and back surgery and her posts cover everything from the latest CDC guidelines, to how her 12 doctors each have just a glimpse of her whole self, through the lens of each of her individual health issues.

Want to see what other blogs made the list? Check out the Top 16.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Patients as Partners: An open letter from Craig to the “normals”

Posted May 20th, 2016 by

We’ve been hearing from members of the Team of Advisors about how they’ve used the Partnership Principles in their health journeys. For Craig (woofhound), who’s living with fibromyalgia, it’s important to forge strong relationships with “normals,” or people who don’t know what it’s like to live with a chronic condition. By talking openly about illness, Craig believes, we can bring about more compassion and understanding for patients.

Below, Craig illustrates the need for open, honest partnerships with “normals” in an open letter, dispelling some misconceptions and vividly describing a day in the life of someone with fibromyalgia.

What You Don’t Know About Your Friend’s Fibromyalgia

So, someone you know (and possibly love) has told you they have fibromyalgia. With all of the medical information available today and A-list celebrities like Morgan Freeman announcing that they have it, most people have an idea of what this disorder is. I’d like to help with that understanding by telling you about the things you probably DON’T know about this very complex condition.

Let’s begin by listing some of the famous people you may know who have fibro. Susan Flannery, Sinead O’Conner, Michael James Hastings, Frances Winfield Bremer, Morgan Freeman, Mary McDonough, Janeane Garofalo and AJ Langer have all acknowledged that they have fibromyalgia.

About 5% of the population — that’s nearly 1 out of every 20 people — have it. Let’s start with a reminder of the more common description of fibro. Fibromyalgia is a complex neurological pain disorder wherein the brain forgets how to evaluate and respond correctly to pain signals in the body and favors a new standard of “If there’s pain present the only level I know is MAXIMUM DISTRESS.”

Let’s dispel a couple of common misconceptions while we’re at it, too:

1: It’s not real pain, it’s only in your head.

This is probably the most damaging and oft-heard misconception about this disorder. Let’s begin by scientifically saying that ALL pain is “IN YOUR HEAD”! Pain is a brain response to negative stimuli. Fibromyalgia pain isn’t suddenly a new experience for the mind; it’s a disorder where the brain begins to mis-categorize pain and reacts to it as though it were “always on” and always worthy of the highest level reaction.

Your friend isn’t overly dramatic or attention seeking. Their brain is indeed reacting to a painful stimulus. They have no recourse but to feel the pain that their mind is presenting to them any more than they could not react to touching a burner on the stove. Take it from a fellow fibromyalgia sufferer; our minds do a great job of sharing that very real pain response within us.

2. Fibromyalgia is a “rare” condition.

The more we research fibromyalgia and the more we know about it, the more we realize that it isn’t very rare; it’s more likely that it’s underdiagnosed and underreported especially among males with fibro. A chronic pain disorder doesn’t sound like a very “macho” condition, and many men don’t wish to seek help with the syndrome for fear of being called unmanly, or wimpish.

Now onto the things you might not know about living with fibro. Any chronic pain disorder such as fibro takes a massive toll on the individual, their partner, and their loved ones. This toll is even worse when those family and loved ones aren’t well informed about the disorder (see misconceptions above). Many individuals living with fibro must continue to work, and their work suffers from sick days and loss of productivity.

Many relationships are tested by fire when one has fibro. It’s difficult for their partner to understand that a medical condition could have SO MANY unrelated symptoms and cause SO MUCH fatigue and pain that one ends up spending most of the day in bed instead of being the alert, energetic and happy person everyone once knew. Families, marriages, and relationships have fallen apart due to the fallout from fibro.

Now I’d like to talk about a term that I like to call the “seduction of the bed.” When you spend the day in pain, go to sleep with pain, and wake up feeling unrefreshed and still in pain, there’s a strong desire just to remain there in your comfortable bed. It’s the only place you can be that minimizes the pain, pressure, and discomfort. I hear my bed calling to me all the time; it’s seductive promise of just a smidgeon less pain if I’ll but give in and crawl back under the warm covers.

Most of us who live with this condition don’t have the choice of staying in bed all day. We have jobs to do in our home or away in an office. We try not to let our pain and fatigue show through the thin veneer of a smile that we wear in an attempt not to draw attention to ourselves. How do we cope with all of this? The day after day after day of constant pain and fatigue slowly begin to take their toll. Finally, we come to understand that we must learn how to prioritize the events in our lives every day and most times we decide those priorities at the very last moment. We have to learn, and help our friends to understand, that yes I accepted your invitation to visit tomorrow, but I must evaluate my fatigue and stamina regularly, right on up to the time of that expected visit to determine if my body is also willing to make that effort.

Sometimes the answer to that evaluation is no. Maybe today was filled with too many of the myriad of seemingly unrelated symptoms that fibro-mites experience. (Warning, the symptoms I’m about to relate aren’t “pretty” or easily whitewashed.) A full day of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where we have mind-numbing cramps that double us over in pain followed by the immediate and overwhelming need to rush to the bathroom for a bowel movement. Maybe today was filled with cognitive fog (CogFog), and even the simplest of words refuse to come to mind when we need them in a sentence leaving us sounding like a blubbering idiot. Maybe today is the day where any piece of clothing touching some sensitive part of our body is too painful to endure, and all we can wear are some light underwear or nothing at all.

We really do care about you and really wanted to visit, but if we listen honestly to our bodies we can’t afford the toll of that visit. We know that makes us come across as “flaky” especially if we’ve had to cancel at the last minute, but if you understood this condition you would see that we don’t really have the choice. We have to prioritize the events in our lives continually; all weighed against the insurmountable weight of this little condition called fibromyalgia.

 

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Raising awareness for immunological and neurological health in May

Posted May 12th, 2016 by

Earlier this year, we interviewed Team of Advisors member Craig, who’s living with fibromyalgia. Craig talked talked about the need to raise awareness for “hidden disabilities” like his condition. So today, we’re doing just that. May 12 is International Awareness Day for Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CINDs), which include fibromyalgia and myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Those living with fibromyalgia or ME/CFS can have many symptoms that aren’t always easy to explain to others. Below, Craig describes a typical day for him in vivid detail:

“Imagine that you’ve just worked one of the hardest days of your life. You are so tired that you can hardly walk. Just changing your clothes is almost more effort than you can handle. Every muscle in your body is aching and tired, and the slightest movement of some of them sends them into a tight painful spasm.”

 

But while fibromyalgia and ME/CFS are both chronic pain syndromes, they aren’t exactly the same. Patients living with ME/CFS experience five main symptoms1, as opposed to the more general symptoms of fibromyalgia:

  • Profound fatigue that impairs carrying out normal daily activities
  • Unrefreshing sleep
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Symptoms that worsen when a person stands up
  • Symptoms that worsen after exerting any type (emotional, physical) effort

If you’ve been diagnosed with a CIND, join the community at PatientsLikeMe. The fibromyalgia community is one of the largest on the site – over 65,000 people are sharing their experiences, along with more than 12,000 living with ME/CFS.


Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.

 

1https://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2015/MECFS/MECFS_KeyFacts.pdf


Food for thought: healthy eating in 2016

Posted January 27th, 2016 by

A lot of people talk about smartening up their diets at the start of a new year. Over the past month, many PatientsLikeMe members have shared eating habits they’re going to keep and the new ones they’d like to start in 2016 — everything from cutting down on salt to going vegan. Take a look at what some people said below:

“I’m not changing my eating patterns. I eat anything I want, just in moderation. I shy away from processed food, limit my salt intake and eat lots of fruits and vegies. I try and snack healthy, although this is hard.”

-MS member  

“I am going to be taking a complete overall look at my diet, as I don’t look after myself anymore, and I am going to try and get back on track!”

-Fibromyalgia member

“My diet excludes all animal products. That means no dairy, no eggs, and no meat or fish. I eat a wide variety of grains, legumes, vegetables and fruit. I avoid processed sugars and use coconut sugar or agave, for example. I made these changes approximately three years ago. I am healthier because of my vegan diet.”

-Major Depressive Disorder member

“I’ve been gluten free since Sept. 2015. I have felt better. I have also added gradually, vitamins and supplements. The most important one being D3. I now am day 3 of 5000iu D3 daily. I also take Omega 3/fish oil daily. Added calcium, C Complex, magnesium, Acetyl L Carnitine, CoQ-10, and B, Glucosamine & Chondroitin. I’m better than I was, more energy, less pain, and IBS is way better. I’m saying this works for me. Consult your doctor before going this route. Looking forward to my best year in a very long time.”

-Fibromyalgia member 

“Since I found out I have MS and cut down on inflammation, I eat very little red meat and pork. Have also cut down on processed food and salt. Feeling better!”

-MS member

Do you have any goals for eating healthy in 2016? Share them with the community!

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, check out the previous editions here.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Meet Craig from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

Posted January 13th, 2016 by

We recently sat down with Craig, one of your 2015-2016 PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors. Craig is living with fibromyalgia and severe degenerative disc disease, the result of a serious car accident in 1978.

Craig is active on PatientsLikeMe and other online communities, where he adds his voice to discussions about chronic pain, healthy living and LGBTQ issues. He’s also written essays to raise awareness about life with fibromyalgia, a “hidden disability” he feels is commonly misunderstood.

In this interview, Craig shares how important it is to have a community he can turn to for support and to remind him he’s not alone.

What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face?

It’s a mixture of both smiles and sadness when I think of my greatest joys. I tragically lost my mother in a traffic accident when I was 19 years old. We had started a conversation the week before where I was trying to “come out” to her (that I was gay). I procrastinated and when she asked if I was, I said I wasn’t sure, that I was working on that answer, and that I’d tell her more next week. Well that conversation never happened, but each time in my adult life that I see or hear about a gay person sharing an important life moment with their mom, like introducing a new partner, or a mom marching with their child in a gay pride parade, I’m overwhelmed with happiness, and sadness, wishing MY mom was there with me to share those moments.

What has been your greatest obstacle living with your condition, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges?

Having a “hidden disability” is hard to live with. We worry about being judged because we outwardly seem “able-bodied”. But if a person could try to walk a mile, not even, walk a BLOCK in our shoes they’d understand what a hidden disability is. I wrote an essay about hidden disabilities entitled “Global Masked Hero Sightings Expected”. It discusses the phenomena that we all know too well — that people with disabilities are “INVISIBLE.” I liken it to having a “superpower,” albeit one that we don’t necessarily wish we had. Here’s a link to it on PLM.

How would you describe your condition to someone who isn’t living with it and doesn’t understand what it’s like?

Imagine that you’ve just worked one of the hardest days of your life. You are so tired that you can hardly walk. Just changing your clothes is almost more effort than you can handle. Every muscle in your body is aching and tired, and the slightest movement of some of them sends them into a tight painful spasm. Your huge, warm, bed calls out to you seductively, and all you want to do is limp over and slip clumsily between the sheets and let the comfort of painless sleep welcome you. When finally sleep overcomes the pain you welcome it as the only comfort you’ve had all day. All too soon you wake up to a new day, and sitting up in bed, you realize that your body still feels as bad or worse than it did the day before — that each time you wake up you NEVER feel rested, or refreshed, and that this will likely go on for the rest of your life.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone newly diagnosed with a chronic condition, what would it be?

Learn EVERYTHING you can about your condition! YOU should be the most knowledgeable person you know about what your condition involves. Research it. Google it. Read about Clinical Trials. Learn about the medications that might be used to treat your condition. Become a walking/rolling Wikipedia about your condition, then USE that information to make the best of living with that condition. When you know and understand almost everything about something, it holds NO power over you.

How important has it been to you to find other people with your condition who understand what you’re going through?

When I was first realizing through first hand experience, the symptoms of my illness, before my diagnosis of Fibromyalgia, I felt overwhelmed and alone in the world. I didn’t understand how a condition could affect SO MANY different parts of my body and life. I could understand the mechanics of my neck and spinal damage, but I didn’t understand how it could manifest in so many different and distant ways. When I joined PLM and found that there were thousands of others with my condition I felt such RELIEF that I was not alone. I felt validated and somehow comforted that others knew what I was going through without being judged as lazy, or malingering, or attention seeking.

Recount a time when you’ve had to advocate for yourself with your provider, caregiver, insurer, or someone else.

I advocate for myself and for others on a daily basis. I’m active on PLM helping others understand more about their conditions. I write essays on many different social media, community, and news sites, helping the mundane world at large see the world through our eyes, and by seeing through our eyes, become better, more compassionate, more loving people.

Can you think of any positive changes that have happened in your life because of your condition(s)?

I believe there is a great balance in the universe for every person’s path in life. That for anything “taken away” by extreme loss or illness there is something “given” that re-balances your journey. There isn’t a year in my life that I would ask to do over again. I have learned SO MUCH from my walk through this world that has made me a better person. By seeing the world without the filters that life wants us to see through we are more able to see the world through the eyes of LOVE. It is BECAUSE of the adversity in my life that I grow closer to seeing the world with unconditional love. This ability to see the world without filters is the ability to see enlightenment. To transcend this earthly existence where we can become anything we desire or imagine.

 

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


PatientsLikeMe Names 2015-2016 Team of Advisors, Sets Focus on Redefining Patient Partnerships

Posted October 19th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, October 19, 2015—PatientsLikeMe has named 14 members to its patient-only 20152016 Team of Advisors and challenged them to work through an issue that’s central to everyone in the healthcare system: how to redefine patient partnerships. The team will be focused on rethinking what it means for patients to be partners, and on establishing new ways for the healthcare industry to connect with patients to deliver better care.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said that in an era when patients must be front and center in healthcare discovery and development, the group’s mission is vital to every patient, pharmaceutical company, regulator, payor and provider. “This advisory team includes some of the strongest patient advocates we have ever met. Their experience can empower other patients, and help those serving patients understand what it means to be a good partner. The team’s work will help create a stronger foundation for a more equal and participatory system of care.

More than 1,400 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. The nearly equal mix of men and women are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), bipolar II, cancer, Type 1 diabetes, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lupus, major depressive disorder (MDD), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and post traumatic stress (PTS). Members named to the team include: Christel Aprigliano, Craig Braquet, Jeff Demers, Cyrena Gawuga, David Gewirtz, Phyllis Marchand, John Michael, Gus Prieto, Laura Roix, Patti Sanner, Allison Silensky, Angela Stogner, Doug Thornburg and Peggy Zuckerman.

Christel Aprigliano is living with Type 1 diabetes and believes that the key to a good partnership is a focused, data-driven discussion on what matters most to patients. “Patient reported outcomes are crucial to the healthcare conversation. The more information we can share about what life is like for patients every day, the more questions we can ask each other, and the better we can help patients live well with the disease they have.”

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently kicked off their 12-month collaboration with PatientsLikeMe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and will convene several times in the coming months. This is the second Team of Advisors the company has formed. Last year, the inaugural group provided feedback to the research team and published a best practices guide that outlines new standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage patients throughout the research process.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


Food for thought: August (diet) edition

Posted August 12th, 2015 by

Many mothers have told their children “you are what you eat,” but some PatientsLikeMe members have taken that idea one step further and are using their diets to try and manage the symptoms of their conditions. People have been sharing about everything from gluten-free to vegan diets – check out what some people said in the conversations below:

“I truly believe, after 50+ years of fibromyalgia symptoms ranging from pain and depression to migraines, irritable bowel, and low thyroid, that the biggest help of all is to watch my diet, get in lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit sugar and alcohol. I supplement my fruits and veg intake with a whole food based supplement. This has allowed me to reduce medication to thyroid supplementation and a very occasional sumatriptan.”
-Fibromyalgia member on her “detox” diet

“My diet is greens, beans, nuts and seeds. Favorites are kale, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, sweet potatoes, black, pinto and kidney beans, lentils, black-eyed peas, cashews, almonds, peanuts and pistachios, flax and pumpkin seeds. I also have occasional sweet potatoes, apples, oranges and watermelon. Grains are consumed about once a week and are usually Farro or Quinoa.”
-Diabetes II member on his vegan diet

“With all my meds and other things I take for depression and the DBS, I can’t say that a gluten-free diet has been particularly whiz-bang helpful. However, I think it may have slowed my symptoms or made me feel better than I should.”

“I am also trying to stay as gluten-free and sugar-free as possible. It is a daunting exercise each day, but may be worth it long-term. I believe that diet plays a huge role in all disease states. All we can do each day, realistically, is take one day at a time and note any positive changes in our PD symptoms to gauge how we are benefitting.”
-Parkinson’s members on their gluten-free diets

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Arthritis Awareness 101

Posted May 27th, 2015 by

You may have heard that arthritis affects the joints, but did you know that it’s an umbrella term used to describe over 100 medical conditions and diseases (known as rheumatic diseases)?1 Conditions that fall underneath forms of “arthritis” include rheumatoid arthritisgoutlupus, and fibromyalgia. And the symptoms can vary depending on the type of arthritis and the person living with the condition.

May is dedicated to raising awareness for arthritis (along with schizophrenia, lupus, CINDs, ALS…) – the people in the following video shared with the United States Congress what it’s like to live with arthritis:

May is drawing to a close, but it’s not too late to share your story on social media through the #ArthritisAwarenessMonth and #ArthritisMonth hashtags. And if you or someone you know has been diagnosed with any form of arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation has put together a collection of resources for everything from pain management to treatment options.

Don’t forget to visit the various arthritis communities on PatientsLikeMe – 7,488 people are sharing about living with rheumatoid arthritis, 4,795 with osteoarthritis and 1,527 with psoriatic arthritis.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for arthritis.


1 https://www.rheumatology.org/about/arthritismonth.asp


Coming together for immunological and neurological health in May

Posted May 12th, 2015 by

If you follow PatientsLikeMe on social media, you might have seen a few “Pop Quiz Tuesday” posts. Today, here’s a special pop quiz – what do fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have in common?

The answer is that they are classified as Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CINDs). And since 1992, every May 12th has been recognized as International Awareness Day for CINDs. Today, in conjunction with Fibromyalgia Awareness Month, it’s time to recognize everyone living with a CIND.

While fibromyalgia and ME/CFS are both CINDs, each is a little different. Check out some quick facts about each condition:

Fibromyalgia1

  • Affects 5 million Americans over the age of 18, and the majority are women
  • The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown
  • Common symptoms include insomnia, headaches, pain and tingling in the hands and feet

ME/CFS2

  • Affects between 836,000 to 2.5 million Americans
  • The large majority of people living with ME/CFS have not been diagnosed
  • There are five main symptoms of ME/CFS, as opposed to the more general symptoms of fibromyalgia:
    • Profound fatigue that impairs carrying out normal daily activities
    • Unrefreshing sleep
    • Cognitive impairment
    • Symptoms that worsen when a person stands up
    • Symptoms that worsen after exerting any type (emotional, physical) effort

But sometimes, living with a CIND can be hard to describe. Check out this short video to get an idea of the invisible symptoms of ME/CFS.

Today, you can share your support for fibromyalgia and ME/CFS on social media through the #May12th, #Fibromyalgia and #MECFS hashtags. If you have a chance, you should incorporate the color blue into your activities, anything from changing the background on your Facebook to shining a blue light on your house at nighttime.

And if you’ve been diagnosed with a CIND, join the community at PatientsLikeMe. The fibromyalgia community is one of the largest on the site – over 59,000 people are sharing their experiences, along with more than 11,000 living with ME/CFS.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for CINDs.


1 http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/fibromyalgia/fibromyalgia_ff.asp

2 https://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2015/MECFS/MECFS_KeyFacts.pdf


Getting to know our Team of Advisors – Karla

Posted February 9th, 2015 by

This past Monday on the blog, Emile shared about her fibromyalgia and what being a part of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors means to her, including how she hopes to help doctors understand that patients need to be treated as individuals, rather than just disease names. Today, we’re featuring Karla. She’s also a member of the Team of Advisors living with fibromyalgia as well. Read below to learn Karla’s views on patient-centeredness, open communication and healthcare in a rural community.

About Karla (aka kam-turtle)
Karla refers to herself as a Southern Gram, who tries not to let her fibromyalgia get in the way of having fun with her grandkids. Karla served as president of a community college prior to retiring from full-time employment in 2010. She has led volunteer boards and fundraising groups, worked in public relations and advertising, and actively worked in a variety of roles in her church. She continues to work part-time as a grant writer, researcher, and owner of a chicken farm where she has a rooster named Handsome. 🙂

After spending a long time finding treatments that worked for her, Karla is passionate about helping others shorten the time between diagnosis and condition management, and she would like there to be better understanding that fibromyalgia is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ condition.

Karla’s view of patient-centeredness
She believes patient-centered healthcare involves open communication between healthcare providers and the patient: “it should be an active and ongoing process to evolve the patient’s care toward results to create a more productive and comfortable lifestyle. It is a two-way communication stream based on mutual respect.”

Karla on being part of the Team of Advisors
Being a part of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors is very humbling but also refreshing to my soul. At times when my illness is at its worst, I have always hoped my affliction could at least somehow benefit someone else, somewhere, even in the future. That is actually happening with the opportunity to be on the Team of Advisors. Like me, each team member is willing to share freely and openly in hopes of making the future better for others. It is so humbling to represent patients from so many walks of life and bring hope for a brighter tomorrow. The work PatientsLikeMe and the advisors have been doing can truly change the way health care functions.

Karla’s experience seeking care for fibro in a rural community
A decade ago, fibromyalgia was a foreign term in my rural community, even to me. Doctors dismissed me as stressed, depressed and overweight. Employers openly joked that people with chronic fatigue syndrome, bipolar and other hidden illnesses were lazy. One doctor said I had a ‘bucket condition’ or unknown problem. After two hospital stays, XRAYS, MRIs, CAT scans and three or four doctors later, I confided in a nurse practitioner who knew me. She knew me before I had spiraled down into a life of pain and she knew I was not faking. She suggested a condition called fibromyalgia and advised seeing a rheumatologist in a regional area. There I received the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. I was devastated and utterly embarrassed. I didn’t want to suffer the ridicule from the uninformed public. When I was too sick to work, I would call in but if I had a doctor appointment, I would generally take vacation time so no one at work would know I was traveling to the rheumatologist.

I desperately wanted to learn about fibromyalgia to see if there was a cure or at least proven ways to manage the pain and fatigue. Eventually I had to give up my career and focus on my health. My family became educated about the condition and they understood my situation. So, then I began to own my situation and share my story. Amazingly, as word got out, many neighbors in my area contacted me to share similar frustrations. Healthcare in rural areas is in short supply, doctors are overloaded, hospitals are money-making machines and patients are deliberately kept uninformed. I firmly believe if not for the concern and care of one nurse practitioner who knew me personally, I might still be switching from prescription to prescription with no answers.

Unfortunately, ten years later, fibromyalgia is still very misunderstood. Based on my experience, I have learned to share about my fibromyalgia life, to advocate for hidden and chronic illness, to educate people about fibromyalgia and to encourage those on a personal journey to keep fibro from taking over their lives!

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for autoimmune diseases and fibromyalgia.


Getting to know our Team of Advisors – Emilie

Posted February 2nd, 2015 by

If you’ve been following the blog, you’ve already met three members of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors – Dana who is living with bipolar II, Lisa who is living with Parkinson’s and Becky who is living with epilepsy. Now, we’d like to introduce Emilie, a social worker and therapist who is living with Sjogren’s Syndrome and fibromyalgia.

About Emilie (aka Memmie)
Emilie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) who works with children living with chronic illnesses and their families. She’s also been a therapist for both children and adults with chronic illness and in her work has developed a pediatric diabetes pain management program. Emilie herself has an autoimmune disease, fibromyalgia — and recently had to resign from this work that she loves due to the pain, fatigue, and subsequent emotional strain. She hopes to return to doing similar work once her medical issues are more manageable.

Emilie on patient centeredness
Emilie believes the question should be asked, “what are the ways your health care provider(s) could be more helpful to you?” to better our understanding of patient centeredness. She believes that doctors need to listen to and respect that their patients know their bodies best.

Emilie on being part of the Team of Advisors
It was really special to be chosen, I didn’t ever in a million years think I would be chosen. When I got to the interview part I thought there’s no way they’ll pick me. When I found out I was chosen I was really excited because I felt like I had been to enough doctors in my life that I had something to share. I hoped that we could help researchers study the things that would be relevant to us — the collective us — instead of just the things they wanted to know and they wanted to study.

Being part of the Team of Advisors makes me feel like I’m more in control, like an expert about my own body. When you go to the doctor, they think they know exactly what’s happening — they’re going to treat it they way they treat everyone else with fibromyalgia or Sjogren’s or arthritis. It’s great to be able to have input to help doctors understand that we need to be treated as individuals and not like a disease name. Just because I have migraines, does not mean my migraines are the same as someone who just walked out of the exam room with migraines.

Others members on the site have contacted me because I’m on the Team of Advisors, and they’ve seen my picture or seen my name and have said “I’ve seen what you’re all doing, and I went to your page and I see you have some of the same things I do and I found you and I thought you could be a good resource for me.” So sometimes I’ve been able to help out and that has been nice.

Emilie on tracking on PLM
One of the things tracking my health on PatientsLikeMe has helped me recognize is that sometimes I think I’ve been feeling lousy forever — I think that’s easy for people with chronic pain to do — but when I look back at my InstantMe chart, I realize there are more days than I thought where I felt good. It gives me hope that things aren’t bad all of the time and that things can get better. When I go to my doctor and they ask me how things have been, I can tell them that things have been up and down, and sometimes there have been more good days than bad days.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for autoimmune diseases and fibromyalgia.


Food for Thought: September weather and autumn recipes

Posted September 30th, 2014 by

Around the PatientsLikeMe office in Boston, the leaves are beginning to turn red, yellow, orange and gold, and everyone is starting to bundle up as the weather gets colder. In turn, PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing their favorite fall recipes and some thoughts about how the weather impacts the conditions they live with. Here’s what some have been saying:

 

I love fall. Cooler temps, brisk breezes, my favorite earth colors and long-sleeved tops with soft vests. The more clothes I put on, the better I feel. [I made] creamed chicken and peas with garlic toast. One of my favorites I only make when the husband is off visiting family.”
-Fibromyalgia member

I love recipes from Real Simple because they tend to be very…ah…simple. This is a crock pot one (yay!) and the potatoes are totally unnecessary if you are avoiding them.
-Mood member

“I will be making sautéed Kobach squash w/ onions, broccoli and some Jasmine rice. Spices turmeric, paprika, salt and pepper. Maybe a little scrambled eggs added.”
-Fibromyalgia member

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.

And don’t forget to check out our other Food for Thought posts if you missed them.


“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Tam writes about (your) life with MS

Posted July 17th, 2014 by

If you were living with multiple sclerosis (MS) and someone said to you, “Well I get tired too, but I don’t go lay down in bed all day,” how would you respond? Invisible symptoms like pain and fatigue are hard to describe to someone who doesn’t get it or isn’t living with MS. But to try and help everyone better understand, PatientsLikeMe member Tam recently wrote a description of what life might be like for you if MS was a part of your day. Read her post below.

The private, invisible pain of MS

Let me take you on a journey; on my journey. I’m asking for a few moments of your time to take a glimpse at what I experience each moment of each day.

I was given an example, which I will start with. We’ll begin at 8am on a Monday morning by clipping a clothespin on the end of each of your fingers. Not so bad, you may be thinking.

Shower, do dishes, get dressed (fasten a bra, zip and button your pants, tie your shoes), make coffee, pick up a medication and take just the one pill you need to take … do all the normal things you might do each morning without a second thought. Maybe you play classical piano. Maybe you type quite fast. I did. How are you at your hobbies and your passions with your hands impaired thusly? Having trouble with pens, spoons, forks?

Ever had a hand cramp? Add a few of those in…but, instead of being able to stretch your hand for relief, you find that when you do, instead of clothespins you now have mousetraps on your fingers. Continue trying to go about your regular life without giving thought to this. Throughout the next few days, have someone randomly swap clothespins and mousetraps for arbitrary reasons…perhaps you put your hand in water that is a bit cooler or warmer than your hands are happy with – snap! Maybe your hands don’t want to scrub shampoo in your hair – snap! Pet the dogs as you always do when they rub up against your hand – snap!

So, it’s lunch time now and you’d really like a salad. Ordinarily getting all the veggies from the fridge and prepping them isn’t a big deal…suddenly it’s become a chore that is taking much more thought than you’ve ever dedicated to a salad prior. And the amount of time it is taking is staggering. Once again, the sharp knife has slipped out of your grasp because your fingers are becoming a bit numb and your grasp isn’t quite what it should be. This time as it falls, it slices your right hand and you have to pause to deal with this additional issue. Have fun trying to maneuver that Band-Aid!

So now you’ve got a combo of mousetraps and clothespins on the ends of your fingers, a throbbing cut, and you give up on eating the salad after the fork drops to the floor *again*. You reach to the floor to pick up that fork for the last time, you swear, and suddenly a mousetrap snaps on your inner elbow! What the heck! A reactive jerk knocks your cut hand into the edge of the table, which causes a clothespin to pinch on the top of that hand. As those new pains begin working their way up your arm, your shoulder begins to ache. Not really an ache…more like someone jabbed an ice pick into the joint!

You were supposed to be somewhere this afternoon, but you realize that driving would be far too dangerous…and anyway, how on earth are you going to manage a steering wheel when each time you even move your right arm, the pain sears from shoulder to fingertips? You somehow manage to press the right buttons on your phone to call and cancel the plans you’d been so looking forward to.

It’s meal time and your neck is starting to cramp from the tension of trying to figure out something you can prepare for your family while the pain continues to whine at you continually. You aren’t in a great mood, which gets ill looks from your spouse as they walk through the door and ask “what’s for dinner?” to which you growl in reply. “Man, I had a day from hell at the office,” they begin, and you really want to be supportive but find yourself barking, “I also had a day from hell…could I get some help in here?”

After standing on your feet in the kitchen for the usual amount of time to prepare and clean up from supper, you realize that now all your toes have clothespins on them. Maybe a hot bath will help, you think…and proceed to lock yourself in the bathroom while running a steaming hot bath (you’ve always liked them super hot)!

You’re so eager to jump in and relax, just knowing it can only help. But, after a few seconds in the ultra warm water, your legs turn to limp noodles and you are feeling as if you will faint. The room is steamy and now all you want is cool air. But, your legs won’t obey your brain and get you out of the water. After some battle with the plug, the tub begins to drain and you use your last bit of effort to turn on the cold water and let it run over your feet. For a few moments, this helps and just as your breathing starts to slow and you’re pondering how to get out of the tub, the clothespins on your toes turn to mousetraps – snap!

You call for your spouse. No answer. You call a bit louder. No answer. You scream their name as loud as you can, but they can’t hear you over the Monday night football game! At some point, you give up and decide that laying naked in the empty tub, with pain shooting up and down your arms, your feet on fire, that crying is the only thing left to do. The tears flow, with no attempt on your part to control them.

A commercial break prompts your spouse to tap on the door and ask if you’re ok. No you are not ok! “I can’t get out of the bathtub,” you say. “What?” they ask. “I AM STUCK IN THE BATHTUB!” you scream. Your spouse tries the doorknob, and finds it locked. “Just a sec, I’ll get a butter knife to unlock it,” you hear. Wiping the tears from your eyes, you decide to buck up. You hear the door being unlocked from the other side and then a slam as it knocks into the drawer which you left out and is now blocking the door from being able to open.

Sometime later, you are out of the tub after your spouse has wrestled with the door, the drawer, and your wet-noodled legs. You feel ill, too hot and thirsty…you want the fan, ice water, to cool off. Your spouse lovingly abandons his football watching plans to find the fan, bring you ice water, help you dry off…help dress you in your favorite pajamas. He tells you that you need to rest, and suggests if you lay down you’ll feel better. You give in even though you had things you wanted to get done tonight. Maybe a little reading? But you can’t maneuver the book and turn the pages…your hands are both numb and painful. You finally get to the right page, only to fumble the book and it ends up on the floor. Making sure to lay on your left side, because your right shoulder still has an ice pick in it…You. Give. Up. Tomorrow, you think, will be better.

Only it isn’t.

Your legs are not working as they should. You try to get out of bed and collapse on the floor because they will no longer support you. The pain of the clothespins and mousetraps flares again and you find that you now have them running up the backs of your legs, as well. Just sliding your way in a half-crawl down the hall to the bathroom leaves you exhausted. You really don’t have time to care about the rug burns that are now on your knees, because you need to pee. And, in the end, you do not make it to the toilet and find yourself sitting on the hall floor in a puddle that is not the dog’s fault this time. Your spouse is at work and you have to ask your child to come assist you. The humiliation is enough to tow you under, but you put on a brave face and try to make a joke about it, to find something in all this to laugh about.

There is no way for you to get in and out of the tub again to wash off, so you ask for a pile of washcloths and a bowl of water and get to work, slowly. Your child has to clean up the puddle, find clean clothes for you, and do a load of dirty pee-drenched laundry. You are sure you still smell it on yourself. A long crawl back to your room and you decide the floor is just going to have to be where you “are” for today.

After this ordeal, you hope that you can zone out and just survive for awhile, when a zap of electricity shoots through your brain. Your body, quite literally, jolts in reaction. This isn’t part of the clothespins and mousetraps! This is your brain! It happens again. When your body releases the tension and collapses on the floor once more, you realize that someone snuck hot coals under your lower back. Try as you might to remove them, they seem stuck to you and are burning your spine. You cry out in anguish.

This can’t be right, you think. The experiment was only with clothespins and mousetraps! What happened to me? Did I actually faint in the bathtub last night and hit my head? Maybe I should see a doctor, just in case. It takes you 30 minutes to get to the right number in your phone, get it to connect and schedule an appointment. Your appointment is on Thursday afternoon. It’s only Tuesday morning.

Rather than go through each section of the following days, let me just add that by Tuesday night you won’t be able to sleep because now there is an ice pick in your left hip. You also feel like someone shoved a hot curling iron up your wazoo and snapped mousetraps along your “tender areas.” Your arms are weak, sore and barely functioning. You can’t even lift a jug of milk. Your legs vacillate between al dente and so waterlogged they are of no use.

Your spouse takes Thursday afternoon off work to get you to the doctor because you cannot drive, nor can you get from the car to the door of the doctor’s office without assistance. Every movement causes one pin or trap to move and send a new pain. Putting on the seatbelt, your spouse isn’t aware they tapped your shoulder and you try to hide the tears as the ice pick jabs deeper. The hot coals on your back have never cooled. You finally get in with the doctor and begin explaining what has happened this week, and realize that he is looking at you like you’ve grown ten heads. You insist all of it is true and he shakes his head and says, “You look just fine. I don’t see why you’re having such trouble.”

Oh, I forgot to mention…the clothespins, the mousetraps, the ice picks, the coals…they are all invisible. Only you can “see” them, only you can feel them, only you know what is happening with each movement. Your brain begins to realize this wasn’t an experiment, begins to realize that there will be no end to this. That providing endorphins to ‘push through it’ won’t do one bit of good.

There will be no surgery to correct this. No medication will cure it. The most you can be offered is something that *perhaps* will reduce the mousetraps to feel like only clothespins, again. You grasp at it and decide that clothespins are better than mousetraps and you can learn to function in a new way. You forget the person that you were before this past Monday and relegate them to a fond memory which you pull out on occasion for nostalgia…but not too often, because it’s just too painful. A far different kind of pain, but pain nonetheless.

You decide to find things to laugh about, to research potential drugs and supplements which may help. You learn that the myelin coating your nerves is disappearing and the shocks and jolts will only continue to increase over time. You’re making adjustments in life as they are needed; finding tools to help do the things you can no longer do for yourself. Some days there are new mousetraps, new ice picks, new coals. Some days, just getting out of bed to go to the bathroom is all you can manage. There will be no shower, no typing, no phone calls on those days.

Some days you can go outside and enjoy the sunshine, see the blooms on your beloved succulents, watch your dog chase a butterfly. You relish those days and hold onto them during the others. On occasion, you have a really great day: A day when you can ride a few miles in the car without crying out at each bump in the road. You might be able to sit at a quiet restaurant for a few minutes with your spouse and maybe visit a store. You’ll pay for this time, but that’s ok…it’s worth it even if you can’t walk the next day again.

You will endure the comments from the uninformed. How you don’t look like you’re too disabled to work, how *they* don’t take pain meds and never would, that perhaps you just need to exercise more, and why on earth do you have to think about your pain with regard to every move you make. Once in awhile even those who should be informed act just as ignorant and insist that you can’t *really* be unable to work.

You don’t mention the fatigue anymore because far too many people laugh and say, “they get tired too but *they* don’t get to lay in bed all day.” You don’t mention how much it anguishes you when you remember the job you loved and how you wish with all your might that you could do it again. You don’t mention how the neurological damage in your brain makes it so that sometimes you can’t even do grade-school addition.

Sometimes, you’ll smile and nod and pretend those comments aren’t just as hurtful as another mousetrap.  That they don’t sear across your brain like another jolt of electricity passing along the neurons, that they aren’t as harmful as a sudden loss of your ability to walk (again). You don’t mention that emotional stress can be just as damaging to your illness as physical stress. You don’t tell them that their comments are every bit as hurtful as the sharpest pain you feel. You don’t mention the many, MANY other ways that your illness affects you each and every moment of each and every day. That it’s like a tantrum-throwing toddler and all you wish for is that it would collapse on the floor and take a nap and give you a break…for just a few minutes.

Sometimes, you won’t be able to keep the tears back…


For more “In my own words” posts, look here.

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for MS.