15 posts tagged “fibro”

Food for thought: healthy eating in 2016

Posted January 27th, 2016 by

A lot of people talk about smartening up their diets at the start of a new year. Over the past month, many PatientsLikeMe members have shared eating habits they’re going to keep and the new ones they’d like to start in 2016 — everything from cutting down on salt to going vegan. Take a look at what some people said below:

“I’m not changing my eating patterns. I eat anything I want, just in moderation. I shy away from processed food, limit my salt intake and eat lots of fruits and vegies. I try and snack healthy, although this is hard.”

-MS member  

“I am going to be taking a complete overall look at my diet, as I don’t look after myself anymore, and I am going to try and get back on track!”

-Fibromyalgia member

“My diet excludes all animal products. That means no dairy, no eggs, and no meat or fish. I eat a wide variety of grains, legumes, vegetables and fruit. I avoid processed sugars and use coconut sugar or agave, for example. I made these changes approximately three years ago. I am healthier because of my vegan diet.”

-Major Depressive Disorder member

“I’ve been gluten free since Sept. 2015. I have felt better. I have also added gradually, vitamins and supplements. The most important one being D3. I now am day 3 of 5000iu D3 daily. I also take Omega 3/fish oil daily. Added calcium, C Complex, magnesium, Acetyl L Carnitine, CoQ-10, and B, Glucosamine & Chondroitin. I’m better than I was, more energy, less pain, and IBS is way better. I’m saying this works for me. Consult your doctor before going this route. Looking forward to my best year in a very long time.”

-Fibromyalgia member 

“Since I found out I have MS and cut down on inflammation, I eat very little red meat and pork. Have also cut down on processed food and salt. Feeling better!”

-MS member

Do you have any goals for eating healthy in 2016? Share them with the community!

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, check out the previous editions here.

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Meet Craig from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

Posted January 13th, 2016 by

We recently sat down with Craig, one of your 2015-2016 PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors. Craig is living with fibromyalgia and severe degenerative disc disease, the result of a serious car accident in 1978.

Craig is active on PatientsLikeMe and other online communities, where he adds his voice to discussions about chronic pain, healthy living and LGBTQ issues. He’s also written essays to raise awareness about life with fibromyalgia, a “hidden disability” he feels is commonly misunderstood.

In this interview, Craig shares how important it is to have a community he can turn to for support and to remind him he’s not alone.

What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face?

It’s a mixture of both smiles and sadness when I think of my greatest joys. I tragically lost my mother in a traffic accident when I was 19 years old. We had started a conversation the week before where I was trying to “come out” to her (that I was gay). I procrastinated and when she asked if I was, I said I wasn’t sure, that I was working on that answer, and that I’d tell her more next week. Well that conversation never happened, but each time in my adult life that I see or hear about a gay person sharing an important life moment with their mom, like introducing a new partner, or a mom marching with their child in a gay pride parade, I’m overwhelmed with happiness, and sadness, wishing MY mom was there with me to share those moments.

What has been your greatest obstacle living with your condition, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges?

Having a “hidden disability” is hard to live with. We worry about being judged because we outwardly seem “able-bodied”. But if a person could try to walk a mile, not even, walk a BLOCK in our shoes they’d understand what a hidden disability is. I wrote an essay about hidden disabilities entitled “Global Masked Hero Sightings Expected”. It discusses the phenomena that we all know too well — that people with disabilities are “INVISIBLE.” I liken it to having a “superpower,” albeit one that we don’t necessarily wish we had. Here’s a link to it on PLM.

How would you describe your condition to someone who isn’t living with it and doesn’t understand what it’s like?

Imagine that you’ve just worked one of the hardest days of your life. You are so tired that you can hardly walk. Just changing your clothes is almost more effort than you can handle. Every muscle in your body is aching and tired, and the slightest movement of some of them sends them into a tight painful spasm. Your huge, warm, bed calls out to you seductively, and all you want to do is limp over and slip clumsily between the sheets and let the comfort of painless sleep welcome you. When finally sleep overcomes the pain you welcome it as the only comfort you’ve had all day. All too soon you wake up to a new day, and sitting up in bed, you realize that your body still feels as bad or worse than it did the day before — that each time you wake up you NEVER feel rested, or refreshed, and that this will likely go on for the rest of your life.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone newly diagnosed with a chronic condition, what would it be?

Learn EVERYTHING you can about your condition! YOU should be the most knowledgeable person you know about what your condition involves. Research it. Google it. Read about Clinical Trials. Learn about the medications that might be used to treat your condition. Become a walking/rolling Wikipedia about your condition, then USE that information to make the best of living with that condition. When you know and understand almost everything about something, it holds NO power over you.

How important has it been to you to find other people with your condition who understand what you’re going through?

When I was first realizing through first hand experience, the symptoms of my illness, before my diagnosis of Fibromyalgia, I felt overwhelmed and alone in the world. I didn’t understand how a condition could affect SO MANY different parts of my body and life. I could understand the mechanics of my neck and spinal damage, but I didn’t understand how it could manifest in so many different and distant ways. When I joined PLM and found that there were thousands of others with my condition I felt such RELIEF that I was not alone. I felt validated and somehow comforted that others knew what I was going through without being judged as lazy, or malingering, or attention seeking.

Recount a time when you’ve had to advocate for yourself with your provider, caregiver, insurer, or someone else.

I advocate for myself and for others on a daily basis. I’m active on PLM helping others understand more about their conditions. I write essays on many different social media, community, and news sites, helping the mundane world at large see the world through our eyes, and by seeing through our eyes, become better, more compassionate, more loving people.

Can you think of any positive changes that have happened in your life because of your condition(s)?

I believe there is a great balance in the universe for every person’s path in life. That for anything “taken away” by extreme loss or illness there is something “given” that re-balances your journey. There isn’t a year in my life that I would ask to do over again. I have learned SO MUCH from my walk through this world that has made me a better person. By seeing the world without the filters that life wants us to see through we are more able to see the world through the eyes of LOVE. It is BECAUSE of the adversity in my life that I grow closer to seeing the world with unconditional love. This ability to see the world without filters is the ability to see enlightenment. To transcend this earthly existence where we can become anything we desire or imagine.

 

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Coming together for immunological and neurological health in May

Posted May 12th, 2015 by

If you follow PatientsLikeMe on social media, you might have seen a few “Pop Quiz Tuesday” posts. Today, here’s a special pop quiz – what do fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have in common?

The answer is that they are classified as Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CINDs). And since 1992, every May 12th has been recognized as International Awareness Day for CINDs. Today, in conjunction with Fibromyalgia Awareness Month, it’s time to recognize everyone living with a CIND.

While fibromyalgia and ME/CFS are both CINDs, each is a little different. Check out some quick facts about each condition:

Fibromyalgia1

  • Affects 5 million Americans over the age of 18, and the majority are women
  • The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown
  • Common symptoms include insomnia, headaches, pain and tingling in the hands and feet

ME/CFS2

  • Affects between 836,000 to 2.5 million Americans
  • The large majority of people living with ME/CFS have not been diagnosed
  • There are five main symptoms of ME/CFS, as opposed to the more general symptoms of fibromyalgia:
    • Profound fatigue that impairs carrying out normal daily activities
    • Unrefreshing sleep
    • Cognitive impairment
    • Symptoms that worsen when a person stands up
    • Symptoms that worsen after exerting any type (emotional, physical) effort

But sometimes, living with a CIND can be hard to describe. Check out this short video to get an idea of the invisible symptoms of ME/CFS.

Today, you can share your support for fibromyalgia and ME/CFS on social media through the #May12th, #Fibromyalgia and #MECFS hashtags. If you have a chance, you should incorporate the color blue into your activities, anything from changing the background on your Facebook to shining a blue light on your house at nighttime.

And if you’ve been diagnosed with a CIND, join the community at PatientsLikeMe. The fibromyalgia community is one of the largest on the site – over 59,000 people are sharing their experiences, along with more than 11,000 living with ME/CFS.

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1 http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/fibromyalgia/fibromyalgia_ff.asp

2 https://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2015/MECFS/MECFS_KeyFacts.pdf


Getting to know our Team of Advisors – Karla

Posted February 9th, 2015 by

This past Monday on the blog, Emile shared about her fibromyalgia and what being a part of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors means to her, including how she hopes to help doctors understand that patients need to be treated as individuals, rather than just disease names. Today, we’re featuring Karla. She’s also a member of the Team of Advisors living with fibromyalgia as well. Read below to learn Karla’s views on patient-centeredness, open communication and healthcare in a rural community.

About Karla (aka kam-turtle)
Karla refers to herself as a Southern Gram, who tries not to let her fibromyalgia get in the way of having fun with her grandkids. Karla served as president of a community college prior to retiring from full-time employment in 2010. She has led volunteer boards and fundraising groups, worked in public relations and advertising, and actively worked in a variety of roles in her church. She continues to work part-time as a grant writer, researcher, and owner of a chicken farm where she has a rooster named Handsome. 🙂

After spending a long time finding treatments that worked for her, Karla is passionate about helping others shorten the time between diagnosis and condition management, and she would like there to be better understanding that fibromyalgia is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ condition.

Karla’s view of patient-centeredness
She believes patient-centered healthcare involves open communication between healthcare providers and the patient: “it should be an active and ongoing process to evolve the patient’s care toward results to create a more productive and comfortable lifestyle. It is a two-way communication stream based on mutual respect.”

Karla on being part of the Team of Advisors
Being a part of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors is very humbling but also refreshing to my soul. At times when my illness is at its worst, I have always hoped my affliction could at least somehow benefit someone else, somewhere, even in the future. That is actually happening with the opportunity to be on the Team of Advisors. Like me, each team member is willing to share freely and openly in hopes of making the future better for others. It is so humbling to represent patients from so many walks of life and bring hope for a brighter tomorrow. The work PatientsLikeMe and the advisors have been doing can truly change the way health care functions.

Karla’s experience seeking care for fibro in a rural community
A decade ago, fibromyalgia was a foreign term in my rural community, even to me. Doctors dismissed me as stressed, depressed and overweight. Employers openly joked that people with chronic fatigue syndrome, bipolar and other hidden illnesses were lazy. One doctor said I had a ‘bucket condition’ or unknown problem. After two hospital stays, XRAYS, MRIs, CAT scans and three or four doctors later, I confided in a nurse practitioner who knew me. She knew me before I had spiraled down into a life of pain and she knew I was not faking. She suggested a condition called fibromyalgia and advised seeing a rheumatologist in a regional area. There I received the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. I was devastated and utterly embarrassed. I didn’t want to suffer the ridicule from the uninformed public. When I was too sick to work, I would call in but if I had a doctor appointment, I would generally take vacation time so no one at work would know I was traveling to the rheumatologist.

I desperately wanted to learn about fibromyalgia to see if there was a cure or at least proven ways to manage the pain and fatigue. Eventually I had to give up my career and focus on my health. My family became educated about the condition and they understood my situation. So, then I began to own my situation and share my story. Amazingly, as word got out, many neighbors in my area contacted me to share similar frustrations. Healthcare in rural areas is in short supply, doctors are overloaded, hospitals are money-making machines and patients are deliberately kept uninformed. I firmly believe if not for the concern and care of one nurse practitioner who knew me personally, I might still be switching from prescription to prescription with no answers.

Unfortunately, ten years later, fibromyalgia is still very misunderstood. Based on my experience, I have learned to share about my fibromyalgia life, to advocate for hidden and chronic illness, to educate people about fibromyalgia and to encourage those on a personal journey to keep fibro from taking over their lives!

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Getting to know our Team of Advisors – Emilie

Posted February 2nd, 2015 by

If you’ve been following the blog, you’ve already met three members of the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors – Dana who is living with bipolar II, Lisa who is living with Parkinson’s and Becky who is living with epilepsy. Now, we’d like to introduce Emilie, a social worker and therapist who is living with Sjogren’s Syndrome and fibromyalgia.

About Emilie (aka Memmie)
Emilie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) who works with children living with chronic illnesses and their families. She’s also been a therapist for both children and adults with chronic illness and in her work has developed a pediatric diabetes pain management program. Emilie herself has an autoimmune disease, fibromyalgia — and recently had to resign from this work that she loves due to the pain, fatigue, and subsequent emotional strain. She hopes to return to doing similar work once her medical issues are more manageable.

Emilie on patient centeredness
Emilie believes the question should be asked, “what are the ways your health care provider(s) could be more helpful to you?” to better our understanding of patient centeredness. She believes that doctors need to listen to and respect that their patients know their bodies best.

Emilie on being part of the Team of Advisors
It was really special to be chosen, I didn’t ever in a million years think I would be chosen. When I got to the interview part I thought there’s no way they’ll pick me. When I found out I was chosen I was really excited because I felt like I had been to enough doctors in my life that I had something to share. I hoped that we could help researchers study the things that would be relevant to us — the collective us — instead of just the things they wanted to know and they wanted to study.

Being part of the Team of Advisors makes me feel like I’m more in control, like an expert about my own body. When you go to the doctor, they think they know exactly what’s happening — they’re going to treat it they way they treat everyone else with fibromyalgia or Sjogren’s or arthritis. It’s great to be able to have input to help doctors understand that we need to be treated as individuals and not like a disease name. Just because I have migraines, does not mean my migraines are the same as someone who just walked out of the exam room with migraines.

Others members on the site have contacted me because I’m on the Team of Advisors, and they’ve seen my picture or seen my name and have said “I’ve seen what you’re all doing, and I went to your page and I see you have some of the same things I do and I found you and I thought you could be a good resource for me.” So sometimes I’ve been able to help out and that has been nice.

Emilie on tracking on PLM
One of the things tracking my health on PatientsLikeMe has helped me recognize is that sometimes I think I’ve been feeling lousy forever — I think that’s easy for people with chronic pain to do — but when I look back at my InstantMe chart, I realize there are more days than I thought where I felt good. It gives me hope that things aren’t bad all of the time and that things can get better. When I go to my doctor and they ask me how things have been, I can tell them that things have been up and down, and sometimes there have been more good days than bad days.

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“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Tam writes about (your) life with MS

Posted July 17th, 2014 by

If you were living with multiple sclerosis (MS) and someone said to you, “Well I get tired too, but I don’t go lay down in bed all day,” how would you respond? Invisible symptoms like pain and fatigue are hard to describe to someone who doesn’t get it or isn’t living with MS. But to try and help everyone better understand, PatientsLikeMe member Tam recently wrote a description of what life might be like for you if MS was a part of your day. Read her post below.

The private, invisible pain of MS

Let me take you on a journey; on my journey. I’m asking for a few moments of your time to take a glimpse at what I experience each moment of each day.

I was given an example, which I will start with. We’ll begin at 8am on a Monday morning by clipping a clothespin on the end of each of your fingers. Not so bad, you may be thinking.

Shower, do dishes, get dressed (fasten a bra, zip and button your pants, tie your shoes), make coffee, pick up a medication and take just the one pill you need to take … do all the normal things you might do each morning without a second thought. Maybe you play classical piano. Maybe you type quite fast. I did. How are you at your hobbies and your passions with your hands impaired thusly? Having trouble with pens, spoons, forks?

Ever had a hand cramp? Add a few of those in…but, instead of being able to stretch your hand for relief, you find that when you do, instead of clothespins you now have mousetraps on your fingers. Continue trying to go about your regular life without giving thought to this. Throughout the next few days, have someone randomly swap clothespins and mousetraps for arbitrary reasons…perhaps you put your hand in water that is a bit cooler or warmer than your hands are happy with – snap! Maybe your hands don’t want to scrub shampoo in your hair – snap! Pet the dogs as you always do when they rub up against your hand – snap!

So, it’s lunch time now and you’d really like a salad. Ordinarily getting all the veggies from the fridge and prepping them isn’t a big deal…suddenly it’s become a chore that is taking much more thought than you’ve ever dedicated to a salad prior. And the amount of time it is taking is staggering. Once again, the sharp knife has slipped out of your grasp because your fingers are becoming a bit numb and your grasp isn’t quite what it should be. This time as it falls, it slices your right hand and you have to pause to deal with this additional issue. Have fun trying to maneuver that Band-Aid!

So now you’ve got a combo of mousetraps and clothespins on the ends of your fingers, a throbbing cut, and you give up on eating the salad after the fork drops to the floor *again*. You reach to the floor to pick up that fork for the last time, you swear, and suddenly a mousetrap snaps on your inner elbow! What the heck! A reactive jerk knocks your cut hand into the edge of the table, which causes a clothespin to pinch on the top of that hand. As those new pains begin working their way up your arm, your shoulder begins to ache. Not really an ache…more like someone jabbed an ice pick into the joint!

You were supposed to be somewhere this afternoon, but you realize that driving would be far too dangerous…and anyway, how on earth are you going to manage a steering wheel when each time you even move your right arm, the pain sears from shoulder to fingertips? You somehow manage to press the right buttons on your phone to call and cancel the plans you’d been so looking forward to.

It’s meal time and your neck is starting to cramp from the tension of trying to figure out something you can prepare for your family while the pain continues to whine at you continually. You aren’t in a great mood, which gets ill looks from your spouse as they walk through the door and ask “what’s for dinner?” to which you growl in reply. “Man, I had a day from hell at the office,” they begin, and you really want to be supportive but find yourself barking, “I also had a day from hell…could I get some help in here?”

After standing on your feet in the kitchen for the usual amount of time to prepare and clean up from supper, you realize that now all your toes have clothespins on them. Maybe a hot bath will help, you think…and proceed to lock yourself in the bathroom while running a steaming hot bath (you’ve always liked them super hot)!

You’re so eager to jump in and relax, just knowing it can only help. But, after a few seconds in the ultra warm water, your legs turn to limp noodles and you are feeling as if you will faint. The room is steamy and now all you want is cool air. But, your legs won’t obey your brain and get you out of the water. After some battle with the plug, the tub begins to drain and you use your last bit of effort to turn on the cold water and let it run over your feet. For a few moments, this helps and just as your breathing starts to slow and you’re pondering how to get out of the tub, the clothespins on your toes turn to mousetraps – snap!

You call for your spouse. No answer. You call a bit louder. No answer. You scream their name as loud as you can, but they can’t hear you over the Monday night football game! At some point, you give up and decide that laying naked in the empty tub, with pain shooting up and down your arms, your feet on fire, that crying is the only thing left to do. The tears flow, with no attempt on your part to control them.

A commercial break prompts your spouse to tap on the door and ask if you’re ok. No you are not ok! “I can’t get out of the bathtub,” you say. “What?” they ask. “I AM STUCK IN THE BATHTUB!” you scream. Your spouse tries the doorknob, and finds it locked. “Just a sec, I’ll get a butter knife to unlock it,” you hear. Wiping the tears from your eyes, you decide to buck up. You hear the door being unlocked from the other side and then a slam as it knocks into the drawer which you left out and is now blocking the door from being able to open.

Sometime later, you are out of the tub after your spouse has wrestled with the door, the drawer, and your wet-noodled legs. You feel ill, too hot and thirsty…you want the fan, ice water, to cool off. Your spouse lovingly abandons his football watching plans to find the fan, bring you ice water, help you dry off…help dress you in your favorite pajamas. He tells you that you need to rest, and suggests if you lay down you’ll feel better. You give in even though you had things you wanted to get done tonight. Maybe a little reading? But you can’t maneuver the book and turn the pages…your hands are both numb and painful. You finally get to the right page, only to fumble the book and it ends up on the floor. Making sure to lay on your left side, because your right shoulder still has an ice pick in it…You. Give. Up. Tomorrow, you think, will be better.

Only it isn’t.

Your legs are not working as they should. You try to get out of bed and collapse on the floor because they will no longer support you. The pain of the clothespins and mousetraps flares again and you find that you now have them running up the backs of your legs, as well. Just sliding your way in a half-crawl down the hall to the bathroom leaves you exhausted. You really don’t have time to care about the rug burns that are now on your knees, because you need to pee. And, in the end, you do not make it to the toilet and find yourself sitting on the hall floor in a puddle that is not the dog’s fault this time. Your spouse is at work and you have to ask your child to come assist you. The humiliation is enough to tow you under, but you put on a brave face and try to make a joke about it, to find something in all this to laugh about.

There is no way for you to get in and out of the tub again to wash off, so you ask for a pile of washcloths and a bowl of water and get to work, slowly. Your child has to clean up the puddle, find clean clothes for you, and do a load of dirty pee-drenched laundry. You are sure you still smell it on yourself. A long crawl back to your room and you decide the floor is just going to have to be where you “are” for today.

After this ordeal, you hope that you can zone out and just survive for awhile, when a zap of electricity shoots through your brain. Your body, quite literally, jolts in reaction. This isn’t part of the clothespins and mousetraps! This is your brain! It happens again. When your body releases the tension and collapses on the floor once more, you realize that someone snuck hot coals under your lower back. Try as you might to remove them, they seem stuck to you and are burning your spine. You cry out in anguish.

This can’t be right, you think. The experiment was only with clothespins and mousetraps! What happened to me? Did I actually faint in the bathtub last night and hit my head? Maybe I should see a doctor, just in case. It takes you 30 minutes to get to the right number in your phone, get it to connect and schedule an appointment. Your appointment is on Thursday afternoon. It’s only Tuesday morning.

Rather than go through each section of the following days, let me just add that by Tuesday night you won’t be able to sleep because now there is an ice pick in your left hip. You also feel like someone shoved a hot curling iron up your wazoo and snapped mousetraps along your “tender areas.” Your arms are weak, sore and barely functioning. You can’t even lift a jug of milk. Your legs vacillate between al dente and so waterlogged they are of no use.

Your spouse takes Thursday afternoon off work to get you to the doctor because you cannot drive, nor can you get from the car to the door of the doctor’s office without assistance. Every movement causes one pin or trap to move and send a new pain. Putting on the seatbelt, your spouse isn’t aware they tapped your shoulder and you try to hide the tears as the ice pick jabs deeper. The hot coals on your back have never cooled. You finally get in with the doctor and begin explaining what has happened this week, and realize that he is looking at you like you’ve grown ten heads. You insist all of it is true and he shakes his head and says, “You look just fine. I don’t see why you’re having such trouble.”

Oh, I forgot to mention…the clothespins, the mousetraps, the ice picks, the coals…they are all invisible. Only you can “see” them, only you can feel them, only you know what is happening with each movement. Your brain begins to realize this wasn’t an experiment, begins to realize that there will be no end to this. That providing endorphins to ‘push through it’ won’t do one bit of good.

There will be no surgery to correct this. No medication will cure it. The most you can be offered is something that *perhaps* will reduce the mousetraps to feel like only clothespins, again. You grasp at it and decide that clothespins are better than mousetraps and you can learn to function in a new way. You forget the person that you were before this past Monday and relegate them to a fond memory which you pull out on occasion for nostalgia…but not too often, because it’s just too painful. A far different kind of pain, but pain nonetheless.

You decide to find things to laugh about, to research potential drugs and supplements which may help. You learn that the myelin coating your nerves is disappearing and the shocks and jolts will only continue to increase over time. You’re making adjustments in life as they are needed; finding tools to help do the things you can no longer do for yourself. Some days there are new mousetraps, new ice picks, new coals. Some days, just getting out of bed to go to the bathroom is all you can manage. There will be no shower, no typing, no phone calls on those days.

Some days you can go outside and enjoy the sunshine, see the blooms on your beloved succulents, watch your dog chase a butterfly. You relish those days and hold onto them during the others. On occasion, you have a really great day: A day when you can ride a few miles in the car without crying out at each bump in the road. You might be able to sit at a quiet restaurant for a few minutes with your spouse and maybe visit a store. You’ll pay for this time, but that’s ok…it’s worth it even if you can’t walk the next day again.

You will endure the comments from the uninformed. How you don’t look like you’re too disabled to work, how *they* don’t take pain meds and never would, that perhaps you just need to exercise more, and why on earth do you have to think about your pain with regard to every move you make. Once in awhile even those who should be informed act just as ignorant and insist that you can’t *really* be unable to work.

You don’t mention the fatigue anymore because far too many people laugh and say, “they get tired too but *they* don’t get to lay in bed all day.” You don’t mention how much it anguishes you when you remember the job you loved and how you wish with all your might that you could do it again. You don’t mention how the neurological damage in your brain makes it so that sometimes you can’t even do grade-school addition.

Sometimes, you’ll smile and nod and pretend those comments aren’t just as hurtful as another mousetrap.  That they don’t sear across your brain like another jolt of electricity passing along the neurons, that they aren’t as harmful as a sudden loss of your ability to walk (again). You don’t mention that emotional stress can be just as damaging to your illness as physical stress. You don’t tell them that their comments are every bit as hurtful as the sharpest pain you feel. You don’t mention the many, MANY other ways that your illness affects you each and every moment of each and every day. That it’s like a tantrum-throwing toddler and all you wish for is that it would collapse on the floor and take a nap and give you a break…for just a few minutes.

Sometimes, you won’t be able to keep the tears back…


For more “In my own words” posts, look here.

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Food for thought: June edition

Posted June 18th, 2014 by

For the past couple months, we’ve been sharing about different members’ favorite foods and recipes, and we’re keeping it going with multiple sclerosis members discussing the pros and cons of smoothies, ALS patients talking about getting sleepy after steak, and the fibromyalgia community sharing about cutting foods out of their diets.

MS forum thread: Nutrition questions anyone?

“And on the other hand, some people, (myself, for instance) have resistance to green smoothies…”

“We love green smoothies. I think they taste best if you use 1/3 green stuff, 1/3 banana, and 1/3 other fruit, like berries, peaches, etc.”

“I can understand the value of smoothies, which have all the fiber blended into the drink, but juice? Not only no, but hell no.”

ALS forum thread: Could a steak make you lethargic?

“I get really tired after chewing. Steak would knock me out!” 

“My hubby has always asked for steak dinners since his dx. He says it makes him feel more energetic.”

“Try really small bites and/or mix with mashed potatoes.”

Fibromyalgia forum thread: gluten/sugar/alcohol free

“I have cut out soda and now drink seltzer water. (I like the bubbles).”

“I had to cut out the alcohol, sugar, red meat and a gluten free diet.”

“It has not been easy. I have on numerous occasions opened that cupboard door to the chocolates but then just closed it again.”

 

 


Food for thought: May edition

Posted May 30th, 2014 by

Just last month, we shared about some of our community members’ favorite foods, and about how what they choose to eat can impact the conditions they live with every day. We heard from the fibromyalgia, type 2 diabetes and multiple sclerosis communities – and to keep the series going, we’ve got three new hot, or cold if you like a good scoop of ice cream, forum threads to share. (If you follow our blog, that hot/cold play just made you smile… again. ☺)

ALS forum thread: tips on how to gain weight while eating healthy?

“… the bottom line is that I need to put on weight. I eat organic foods when possible, no sugar and a little if any wheat.”

“I rely on high calorie fruit (but all are good) such as bananas, mangoes, blueberries, etc. I just blend them up (using one fruit) to make smoothies.” 

“You might try using Ensure, Boost or other nutritional food extras.” 

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis forum thread: Primal blueprint

“The basic premise is that we should be eating like our pre-agricultural ancestors and eliminate grains and sugars from our diet. I need to lose weight to get on the transplant list…”

“And it becomes very surprising to find out how wheat is found in many unexpected products.”

“Men do demonstrate the ability to lose weight quicker and faster than women … although I prefer the word ‘program’ to ‘diet’” 

PatientsLikeMe forum thread: Nutrition questions anyone?

“Someone mentioned to me, and I am wondering if it is a concern to others, that the skin of fruit nowadays might have too many toxins from sprays, etc. … do others that eat non-organic worry about that?” 

“Juicing is a wonderful way to gulp down the 10-20 servings of raw fruits and vegetables that many are encouraged to intake.

“My intestines are very sensitive to fibre, I would have to build up the fibre content very slowly, or they would go straight through me …”

Jump into one of these forum threads or you can always start your own with a favorite recipe, general diet tips that have worked for you or a question you think the community can help answer.


The Patient Voice- Fibromyalgia member Becca shares her story

Posted May 28th, 2014 by

 

What does sharing about health experiences and donating #dataforgood mean to her?
“I’m hoping that my contribution is going to help others who come behind me who have these conditions have an easier time of it.” -Becca

If you missed our video interview with Ed, a Parkinson’s disease member, you can catch that here.


Spreading the word for arthritis

Posted May 23rd, 2014 by

Lupus? Check. Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS? Check. ALS, cystic fibrosis, Huntington’s disease, mental health, schizophrenia, anxiety and depression? Check!

There’s been a ton of awareness going on in May, but there’s still one more theme to go – National Arthritis Awareness Month. This month, the Arthritis Foundation (AF) is encouraging us all to spread the word to everyone we know.

According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe over 100 medical conditions and diseases, known as rheumatic diseases.1 The CDC estimates that 52.5 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia).2 Common symptoms generally include, but are not limited to:

  • Joint pain
  • Stiffness
  • Inflammation or swelling (most frequently in the hips, knees, hands and wrists)

If you’d like to learn more, the ACR has gathered a wealth of information on all the different kinds of arthritis. And if you’re not sure how to participate in Arthritis Awareness Month, here are a few places to start:

Finally, with over 6,000 members, the rheumatoid arthritis community is the largest group of arthritis members on PatientsLikeMe, but many more are living with osteoarthritis (3,994) psoriatic arthritis (1,278) and other forms of the inflammatory condition. They’re donating their personal health data to help others learn about life with arthritis, and they’re always sharing in the forum about symptoms, treatments, advice and more.


1 https://www.rheumatology.org/about/arthritismonth.asp

2 http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/arthritis_related_stats.htm


Making fibromyalgia visible this May

Posted May 7th, 2014 by

The National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association (NfmCPA) is recognizing Fibromyalgia Awareness Month with an awesome theme – “C.A.R.E. & Make Fibromyalgia Visible.” C.A.R.E. stands for Contribute, Advocate, participate in Research, and Educate others about fibromyalgia, and that’s exactly what’s going on throughout May.

Fibromyalgia (commonly shortened to “fibro”) causes widespread body pain or aching muscles – myalgia – that can be localized to specific areas called tender points. Other symptoms include tingling, numbness, fatigue and sleep disturbances.1 In most cases, fibromyalgia is limited to women, but men and children can also be affected – it’s estimated that 3% to 6% of the world’s population has the condition, and about 1 in 50 Americans are living with fibro at any given time.2 3

So how can you help raise awareness for fibromyalgia in May?

The fibro community on PatientsLikeMe is one of the largest on the site, and it’s growing by the day – this time last year, there were about 30,000 in the community, and now, it’s more than 42,000 strong! They’re donating their data through personalized health profiles and sharing their stories in the forum to help others with fibromyalgia.

The cause of fibromyalgia is not fully understood,1 and if you’ve been diagnosed, no one understands what it’s like better than you – connect with others living with fibro today and start sharing your experiences for Fibromyalgia Awareness Month.

PatientsLikeMe is the most empowering place I could ever imagine, giving us all not just information, but courage enough to be proactive rather than sit back and hope the doctor is doing the right thing…” – Fibro member Lizupatree

 

 

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for Fibromyalgia Awareness Month.


1 http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/fibromyalgia.htm

2 http://fmaware.org/site/PageServera6cc.html?pagename=fibromyalgia_affected

3 http://www.myfibro.com/fibromyalgia-statistics


Food for thought: April edition

Posted April 15th, 2014 by

Everyone’s got a favorite dish (pizza is one of ours), and many PatientsLikeMe members share a bunch of their recipe ideas and foods in the forum. So, we’re going to start highlighting some of the hottest – or maybe the coolest, if you like gazpacho – conversations on the blog as part of a new “Food for thought” series. We’ll be featuring what people are saying in different condition communities.

So, what are people talking about this month?

Fibromyalgia forum thread: What did you make for dinner tonight?

“Leftover sage and rosemary soup, added mushrooms and scrambled egg batter. Stirred until cooked, added sea salt and pepper. Yummy!”

“Crock pot lamb shanks and salad.”

“A protein bar and yogurt – not hungry.”

Type 2 diabetes forum thread: High early morning blood glucose readings

Try having a low carb high protein snack at bedtime. This usually helps me have a lower reading in the morning. I have a really grainy piece of toast with peanut butter or cheese and it works wonders.”

“I eat my dinner at 4:30 or 5 p.m.  I also watch my carbs.  That helps me get the sugar down in the morning.

“At night for a snack and hour or so before bed I might have a piece of celery with peanut butter.

Multiple sclerosis forum thread: Different diets and reactions

“I have to say, the flavor of grass-fed beef is far superior to that of the ‘conventionally raised’ beef.”

“I have gone with the Mediterranean diet and it seems to have helped me physically. Not so much neurologically, though

Does any of that sound familiar? If you are living with fibromyalgia, diabetes type 2 or multiple sclerosis, join PatientsLikeMe and jump into a conversation in the forum, or start a new thread of your own. Sharing experiences has never tasted so good!


Patient Interview: “A Sense of Togetherness, Love and Unity”

Posted December 17th, 2010 by

This week’s “Treat Us Right” theme focused a lot on the sentiments and data you share every day to help others learn more about your real-world experiences.  We, at PatientsLikeMe, also like to just check in to see how you’re doing as a person, not just a patient.  Here’s an interview with member “jesus reigns,” a member of our PatientsLikeMe Fibromyalgia Community who was interviewed for last month’s newsletter.   Read on to learn more about what puts a smile on her, her attitude on life, her favorite holiday traditions and more. Enjoy!

* * *

2166 (Amy) What puts a smile on your face?
mama-full (jesus reigns) My children, my church family and the holidays.  Christmas is my favorite holiday, so I get to enjoy all of those things at the same time.  I am very sentimental, so it doesn’t take much for me to get emotional.
2166 (Amy) How would you describe your attitude on life?
mama-full (jesus reigns)
My attitude on life has changed quite a bit since I became ill with fibromyalgia.  I used to think that everything had to be done each day, just so.  I was a master in multi-tasking and could get by on six hours of sleep a night.  I would take on more and more tasks outside of the home, church assignments, school activities and so on.  My day was always full of things to do, and not enough time in which to do them.  I used to feel guilty when I couldn’t fulfill all of my obligations to everyone, and try that much harder to please everyone.

Now, my attitude is that life is meant to be enjoyed, not worked through.  I have learned to delegate tasks around the house to my children, instead of trying to do it all myself.  I cut down on my outside activities drastically, even having to drop out of our choir in church for a while.  I am still learning how to pace myself, and to understand that being ill is not my fault.

In knowing this, I am past feeling guilty about the things I can’t control.  Because God is my priority, my trust and help lie in Him, so I am taking life as it comes, while my faith is in Him.

2166 (Amy) What is your favorite holiday tradition and why?
mama-full (jesus reigns) Christmas is on the top of my list.  My favorite holiday tradition is my family and I going to our candlelight services at midnight at our church on Christmas morning.  We usher in Christmas by singing Christmas songs and lighting candles in a circle around our church, each member holding a candle.  It is our way of putting Christ first for the day, and acknowledging that this is our first priority.  It gives us a sense of togetherness, love and unity.
2166 (Amy) What features of PatientsLikeMe do you use most?
mama-full (jesus reigns) I use the update pages the most.  It is very handy, because I can keep track of my symptoms whenever I want to.  I also like the way that I can use this to print off [my updated history] for my doctor’s appointment.
2166 (Amy) Thanks so much for sharing, jesus reigns!

Patients Like Me Can Run 13.1 Miles With Fibromyalgia

Posted February 6th, 2009 by

13.1 grueling miles.  A half marathon.  Running that distance for anyone is a challenge that takes months of training and dedication.  Imagine running that distance having fibromyalgia.

My close friend and PatientsLikeMe member, Minnie Lee, has fibromyalgia and courageously ran in the Surf City Half Marathon last Sunday.  This wasn’t even her first time running it.  She has dedicated herself to running and finishing half marathons and triathlons despite her disease.  Pain or no pain, Minnie finishes.

PatientsLikeMe was there to sponsor and encourage Minnie to achieve her goal:  finish in under 3 hours.  “I run because so many people can’t,” says Minnie breathlessly through tears after crossing the finish line.  Supported by close friends Shirley Huang and Lilian Tham, Minnie finished strong despite the pain.

Yes, Patients Like Minnie can run 13.1 miles!

For more inspirational videos from our fibromyalgia community, visit www.youtube.com/PatientsLikeMeFibro.

PatientsLikeMe member dwilliams