6 posts tagged “ALS Awareness”

Want to know more about Radicava (edaravone)? Here’s a snapshot:

Posted August 17th, 2017 by

With the recent FDA approval of Radicava (edaravone), we wanted to know more about how it works and what it means for patients living with ALS. We asked Maria Lowe, Pharm.D., BCPS, and our Health Data Integrity team, to give us a snapshot of the drug, how it’s used and what you should know. Maria’s rundown is meant to give you more context so you can have better conversations with your care team – as always, talk with your physician before starting any type of new treatment.

Radicava: The quick hits

  • Radicava works as a free radical scavenger.
  • When free radical (toxic by-products of cells that are highly unstable and reactive) levels are too high, cells are damaged resulting in oxidative stress (which may damage motor neurons). The way in which Radicava works to help patients with ALS is not fully understood yet; however, researchers believe that by getting rid of these free radicals it can help prevent some cell damage.
  • In clinical trials, treatment with Radicava was found to slow the decline in functional disability as measured by ALSFRS-r scores for some patients. However, it is important to note that Radicava does not stop the death of motor neurons (it’s not a cure).
  • Radicava may be taken in conjunction with riluzole (consult healthcare provider).
  • Radicava is administered intravenously (60 mg IV over 60 min) daily for 14 days, followed by a 14-day drug-free period. Subsequent cycles are administered daily for 10 days over a 14-day period followed by 14-day drug-free periods. Because this drug is meant for long term use, patients will need to have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line) or some other kind of catheter installed.

Clinical trials and FDA approval

  • FDA approval for Radicava was based on a Phase III clinical trial conducted in Japan only in Japanese patients. Patients enrolled had to have ALS for less than two years, have normal respiratory function as well as the ability to complete most activities of daily living.
    • Radicava may be processed and function differently in different patient populations. Post marketing data will be important for determining the effects and impact of the drug in patients other than those who participated in the clinical trials.

Side effects and reactions:

  • The most common side effects reported in clinical trials include bruising, problems walking (gait disturbance), and headache.
  • Hypersensitivity reactions:  Radicava may cause allergic reactions that could happen after the infusion has finished.
    • Symptoms to watch for: Hives, swelling, dizziness, wheezing, shortness of breath, itching, and fainting.
    • If you’ve experience allergies to other medications before, inform your healthcare provider.
  • Sulfite allergic reactions: Since Radicava includes sodium bisulfite as an ingredient, those with sulfite allergies should be cautious when taking this drug.
    • Those with asthma have a higher risk of developing sulfite sensitivity. Let your healthcare provider know if you have asthma.
    • Symptoms to watch for: Hives, trouble breathing/ swallowing, itching, swelling, dizziness, asthma attacks (in people with asthma), wheezing and fainting.
    • If you have a sulfa allergy, you may or may not have a reaction to this drug. Sulfa allergies are a result of hypersensitivity to a chemical structure called sulfonamides, which are common in many antibiotics. Sulfites are chemically different from sulfonamides and any reaction to sulfites is not related to sensitivity to sulfa drugs. Both can cause reactions, but they are not related.
  • If you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant and/or are breastfeeding, let your healthcare provider know. It is not known if Radicava will harm the baby or if it passes into breast milk.

Availability and access

  • Radicava is expected to be available in August of this year as a brand name drug and it’s estimated it will cost around $145,000 per year in out of pocket costs (does not account for insurance coverage).
  • Because the drug isn’t available yet, many insurance companies may not have developed policies regarding coverage. Different insurance programs will develop such policies of coverage of new drugs at different times.
  • MT Pharma America (MTPA), the manufacturing company for Radicava, has developed a program called Searchlight Support to help people with ALS learn more about this treatment and to help them find and secure coverage through their insurance.
    • Searchlight Support offers out of pocket support options only to certain eligible patients with commercial insurance. Patients with Medicaid, Medicare and other government funded insurance may not qualify.

Interested in learning more about whether Radicava is right for you?

Check out the medication guide and contact the Searchlight Support program to learn more about the potential financial support programs and to find an infusion center near you.

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Disclaimer: At PatientsLikeMe, we’re all about transparency, so please keep in mind that this piece is solely to provide a snapshot of Radicava so you can stay informed and make better decisions with your care team. This content isn’t sponsored and we don’t have a financial relationship with the drug manufacturer.


Worth a thousand words: A day in the life of Larry

Posted April 14th, 2017 by

As a child, Sarah Howell loved art. She got her first camera at 6 years old and realized, over time, that she had a way of connecting emotionally and expressing herself through photos. Now, she has her own studio. Her passion? Capturing genuine family moments. Sarah often stays overnight in the home of the family so she can spend the entire next day with them, from start to finish.

A day in the life of Larry Tyler

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

When Sarah’s friend, Teri, asked her to capture a day in the life of her father, Larry Tyler, she was both shocked and honored. Larry, living with ALS that required 24-hour care, wanted the photos released to raise awareness and funding for ALS.

Sarah was there with her camera, from Larry’s wake-up at 10:30am, until he went to bed that evening. What emerged was a series of 24 deeply moving photos that capture a day in the life of Larry and his family.

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

While she was prepared for sad moments with the family, she wasn’t prepared for the level of caregiver exhaustion she witnessed. For Sarah, the realization that ALS is a family disease was the hardest part of her visit.

 

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

Despite the hard moments of exhaustion, chaos and frustration, Sarah also witnessed how Larry and his family coped: with laughter and humor.

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

© Sarah E Studios  |  www.sarahestudios.com

Reflections

After this time with Larry and his family, Sarah now wants to photograph a day in the life of one person living with ALS every year. Even though she doesn’t have a personal connection to ALS, she feels that this story could resonate with other caregivers. She shared her collection at a gallery and was moved by the reception.

Sarah hopes the collection will not only raise awareness for ALS, but also to increase awareness of the need for caregiver support and therapy. In the meantime, she hopes that her photos can do some good.

Check out the rest of Sarah’s 24 photo collection with Larry.

Find other ALS caregivers

Do any of Sarah’s photos resonate with you? Share in the comments.

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