66 results for “openness”

PatientsLikeMeOnCall™: “A Look Ahead” at Openness in Healthcare (Episode 4)

Posted April 15th, 2011 by

“I think we can see there are a lot of ways where openness can be powerful.  What’s necessary is to help facilitate openness and reduce the barriers to sharing medical information.” – Ben Heywood

PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and President Ben Heywood

PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder Ben Heywood has blogged previously about openness and sharing – and how important they are for patients. In this edition of PatientsLikeMeOnCall, he talks about the progress we’ve made in achieving openness within the healthcare industry and his vision for the expansion of the patient voice.

How can we put patients back at the center of healthcare? What barriers do we need to break through so that patients like you can openly share your health information?  Ben answers these questions and more in the fourth and final episode of our “A Look Ahead” podcast series.

Tune in to Ben’s full interview here:

Did you miss any of the first three episodes?  Find them on our blog or iTunes page.

PatientsLikeMe member afleishman


PatientsLikeMe in Wall Street Journal: Transparency, Openness and Privacy (cont’d)

Posted October 11th, 2010 by

Journalist Julia Angwin of the Wall Street Journal just published an article describing how a major media monitoring company, Nielsen BuzzMetrics,  scraped our forum last Spring.  (See my previous blog post on the incident – “Transparency, Openness and Privacy”)

Julia’s piece includes details regarding how this incident happened, how we (and you) responded and more.  We are very excited about this article.  Having a rigorous debate about transparency, openness and privacy is critical to us achieving the trust we want to have with you, our patients.

What Nielsen did was clearly a violation of our User Agreement.  However, we believe this incident (and this article) have spurred an important ongoing discussion about what is right, just and appropriate regarding how companies operate in this new networked world.  As I said to Julia, this is a new frontier.  We also believe there’s a lot for everyone to learn from this experience, especially around how to put patients first.

Read Julia’s piece and tell us what you think.

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood


Will Openness Bring About a Breakthrough?

Posted September 16th, 2010 by

Share your thoughts in an innovative online event
with our partner Myelin Repair Foundation.
mrf-breakthroughs-sticker

Our Openness Philosophy is centered around the idea that patients sharing their real world health data allows for collaboration on a global scale; that it will accelerate new treatments; and that it can change our health care system.  In this same spirit of openness, The Myelin Repair Foundation (MRF) has recently announced a new collaborative event.

This fall MRF is inviting scientists, industry experts, patients, policy makers, and other big thinkers inside and outside of the medical research enterprise and health care industry to two online “idea sourcing” events called “Breakthroughs to Cures”. These events are designed to explore creative ways to accelerate the pace of medical research and shorten the time to market for new medicines for all diseases.

The two events will take place respectively on October 7-8 and November 9-10  and there will be as many as 600 individuals from a wide range of backgrounds in online conversation threads that are expected to identify new strategies for accelerating research.  Here is a chance for patients to come to the table, contribute your ideas, your experiences with illness, and your sense of urgency to the discussion.  If you’d like to learn more and register for the events, visit “Breakthroughs to Cures”.

At PatientsLikeMe, we believe that real world data sharing helps drive research, helps patients make treatment decisions, and improves patient relationship with doctors.  The results from our user survey indicate that many members of PatientsLikeMe agree the site has helped them to understand side effects of their treatments and has helped them find another patient with experience of taking a specific treatment for their condition.  In fact, 65% of patients feel they are more involved in treatment decisions because of what they learned on PatientsLikeMe.

We believe, given this power, patients have the ability to affect a huge change in the medical system.  Make your voice heard by participating in one or both of these unique online events.

It’s your data, your ideas, your experience, your future – share on.

PatientsLikeMe member mcotter


Transparency, Openness and Privacy

Posted May 20th, 2010 by

The following message was sent this morning to all members of PatientsLikeMe.  Please read what we have to say about openness, sharing and its privacy implications and join the conversation.

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Dear PatientsLikeMe Members,

What are the privacy implications of sharing in this open, online community?  We talk a lot about this and, as a company, strive to be transparent about the risks and rewards to sharing here.  Two recent events have prompted me to reach out to all the members of PatientsLikeMe to ensure we all understand openness, sharing and its privacy implications.

The first event happened last month when a patient asked us to remove all the data on his/her profile from the system.  The member wrote:

“The reason I’m leaving is I feel I didn’t fully understand the privacy impact of having all my health information for practically anyone in the world to see.”

We rarely receive a request like this, but since receiving this one, I have thought about it every day.   We do not want anyone to be surprised by the impact of sharing data on PatientsLikeMe.  We believe in openness, but we also want people to knowingly make the choice to be open with their health information.

This brings me to the second event.  Recently, we suspended a user who registered as a patient in the Mood community.  This user was not a patient, but rather a computer program that scrapes (i.e. reads and stores) forum information.  Our system, which alerts us when an account has looked at too many posts or too many patient profiles within a specified time interval, detected the user.  We have verified the account was linked to a major media monitoring company, and we have since sent a cease and desist letter to its executives.

While this was not a security breach, it was a clear violation of our User Agreement (which expressly forbids this type of activity) and, more significantly, a violation of the community’s trust.  Your Account Information (e.g. your names and emails) was NOT in danger of being stolen.  It is likely that the forum information that was “scraped” would be sold as part of that company’s Internet monitoring product.  In fact, we sell a similar service, PatientsLikeMeListenTM, to our clients so they better understand the voice of the patient.

What does this all mean to you?  What can you do?

  1. We recognize that people write very personal things in the forum and often use real names.  In any growing network of tens of thousands of members, there is no way to ensure that information you share in the forum or on your profiles will not be read by others.  Know that the information you enter in our system is shared (unless we tell you it is private, like full name and email in your Account Information).  It can and will be read by other patients, the PatientsLikeMe team, researchers, and others that use PatientsLikeMe, including our partners with whom we share de-identified data.
  2. Please weigh the benefits of sharing and the amazing value you all create in helping each other versus the risks of people, unknown to you, reading your posts.  Your input helps PatientsLikeMe and our partners learn about your disease and make better products to meet your needs.
  3. Learn and understand why we value openness.  If you haven’t, please read the Read This! FAQ.  If you want to know how we make money, you can take a look at this FAQ or go to our Partners Page and know that we sell your data and insights (but not your identity) to our customers.
  4. Consider the value of being part of the PatientsLikeMe community and make the right risk decisions for yourself.  Together, we can really change the way diseases are treated and managed by putting you, the patients, in the center of healthcare.  We can hold companies accountable for the strengths and weaknesses of their products and also help make those products better – but that requires openness and that is your choice.

We welcome your comments and questions and we love feedback. This has been posted on our blog, which is a good place to dialogue, as is the forum.

On behalf of the entire PatientsLikeMe team, I want to thank you for being part of our communities and sharing your experiences.

Sincerely,
Ben Heywood
President and Co-founder, PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood


Sharing, Openness…and Privacy?

Posted November 18th, 2009 by

Every so often, we sit down to try and make our business objectives clearer to our patient communities.  Why?  Well, we can’t have a business without you and our communities can’t exist to help patients without a business.

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This often results in our Privacy Policy and User Agreement being updated to help clarify our goals and objectives.  One of our company’s core values is transparency, which means we never want to surprise you.  Our site wouldn’t be what it is today if we didn’t honor the trust you put in us.  Because of that trust and our values, we want you to understand what our Privacy Policy means for you and make sure it clearly states what we’re doing with your information as a business.

So, what has changed about our Privacy Policy?  Well, the short answer is not much – but if you haven’t read it in a while, it will read differently (and hopefully much clearer).  As you know, we talk very openly about how we encourage our paying customers to partner with our patients (check out our Read This! section) to better serve your needs. The latest changes to the Privacy Policy reflect what we have always intended to do as a business, which we’ve hopefully expressed to you.  In this latest revision, we try to make it clearer by providing examples of what different parts of the policy means.  We give specific examples of real world cases of where and when your data is used and/or sold.

For example, over the last year we have expanded our efforts into understanding drug safety in the real world.  This started with the Treatment Evaluations – letting you tell us (and our customers) what is good and what is bad about the treatments you are taking.  Next, we piloted (in our MS community) the ability to voluntarily report adverse events directly to the FDA through PatientsLikeMe.  Lastly, in conjunction with UCB, we are expanding our efforts to measure drug safety in the Epilepsy community.  All of these initiatives are building to a better understanding of how treatments work in the real world – one of our goals here at PatientsLikeMe.

As we’ve said through our site from the start – you control your information and you “may enter as much or as little information as they like.” We just added “and should not enter any information they feel uncomfortable sharing.”  This is common sense on any website, but for new members we wanted to make it clearer.   The bottom line – the more you share about your real identity online (whether its on PatientsLikeMe or other Internet sites), the better the chance that someone could identify you.

If you haven’t see our Read This! section, please do.  It’ll help give you a sense of what we believe the risks and benefits are to sharing information.  Openness is at the core of who we are as a company (see our Openness Philosophy).  Your openness is improving patients’ lives, accelerating research and helping improve medical care.   Thank you for that.  If you have any questions or comments, you know where to find us!

PatientsLikeMe member bheywood


To spit or not to spit (openness gets personal)

Posted January 22nd, 2008 by

23andMe Kit

Over the past seven months of working at PatientsLikeMe, I’ve come to think that the idea of sharing medical and health information is completely normal. Since giving birth to my nearly 3 year old daughter, I have continued to be eternally grateful to other mothers who have willingly and openly shared their deeply personal experiences and advice so readily. There are some unexpected things you have to deal with, and nothing is so helpful as the wisdom of others who’ve been there. Then this December, I had a moment of pause. All of us at the company received a year-end gift of 23andMe‘s Personal Genome Service. Here was my chance to find out what my genes have in store for me and to find out what I might have passed onto my little girl. But do I really want to know? And once I find out, do I want share that information?

Well, it took a while to decide and I hadn’t expected that. I realized that deciding to put very personal details about my health, current or future, out into the world is no small thing. I commend each and every person who has chosen to share their information in our PatientsLikeMe communities. I wouldn’t have made it this far into motherhood without the nitty-gritty, honest information that other mothers have shared with me, and I’ve been truly and deeply inspired by the information that people have so willing shared on our site. I would certainly want access to that knowledge and experience if I needed it. But, if I want to have access to that kind of information, then I have to do my part too. So in the end, I decided to spit. Now I’m waiting to find out what my genes have in store for me and my family. Openness, here I come.

PatientsLikeMe member kbrigham


The Value of Openness

Posted December 13th, 2007 by

plm logo gif

Welcome to the PatientsLikeMe blog. Here you will get firsthand accounts of our growth and how we are impacting global health care. Why have we chose the name “The Value of Openness”? Read our Openness Philosophy below, and you’ll see why.

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Openness is a good thing.

Most healthcare websites have a Privacy Policy. Naturally, we do too. But at PatientsLikeMe, we’re more excited about our Openness Philosophy. It may sound counterintuitive, but it’s what drives our groundbreaking concept.

You see, we believe sharing your healthcare experiences and outcomes is good. Why? Because when patients share real-world data, collaboration on a global scale becomes possible. New treatments become possible. Most importantly, change becomes possible. At PatientsLikeMe, we are passionate about bringing people together for a greater purpose: speeding up the pace of research and fixing a broken healthcare system.

Currently, most healthcare data is inaccessible due to privacy regulations or proprietary tactics. As a result, research is slowed, and the development of breakthrough treatments takes decades. Patients also can’t get the information they need to make important treatment decisions. But it doesn’t have to be that way. When you and thousands like you share your data, you open up the healthcare system. You learn what’s working for others. You improve your dialogue with your doctors. Best of all, you help bring better treatments to market in record time.

PatientsLikeMe enables you to effect a sea change in the healthcare system. We believe that the Internet can democratize patient data and accelerate research like never before. Furthermore, we believe data belongs to you the patient to share with other patients, caregivers, physicians, researchers, pharmaceutical and medical device companies, and anyone else that can help make patients’ lives better.

Will you add to our collective knowledge… and help change the course of healthcare?

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Thoughts? Comments? We’re always eager to engage in conversation regarding openness of health data.

Thanks, and welcome to “The Value of Openness”.

PatientsLikeMe member dwilliams


Top Rheumatoid Blogs of 2016

Posted February 2nd, 2017 by

Today is Rheumatoid Awareness Day and this year we wanted to share some of the top rheumatoid arthritis blogs that were included in Healthline’s 16 Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Blogs of 2016 list:

  1. Itis

Stay up-to-date to learn about RA’s long-term effects and practical tips for living with RA. This blogger’s socks help treat the pain of RA and of Raynaud’s, (an autoimmune blood vessel dysfunction that sometimes co-occurs with RA).

2. All Flared Up

This blog is about “living rather than wallowing” with RA. Check in to see how blogger Amanda is learning to understand her body and how it works with RA.

3. Arthritic Chick

Before Arthritic Chick was finally diagnosed with RA, she suffered with pain in her hands, feet and ribs for years. On her blog, she shares the good days, and her bad days with openness, honesty and strength.

4. An Attitude of Gratitude

Julie Faulds’ easygoing blog gives us a peek into her life with her family, thunder-phobic dog — and, her RA and fibromyalgia. Julie chooses an “attitude of gratitude” and her bad days make her good days better and brighter. Always an advocate of finding the positive, she suggests thinking of your RA downtime as a “spa day” instead of a sick day.

5. Carla’s Corner

Carla Kienast’s RA journey has included knee, hip, and back surgery and her posts cover everything from the latest CDC guidelines, to how her 12 doctors each have just a glimpse of her whole self, through the lens of each of her individual health issues.

Want to see what other blogs made the list? Check out the Top 16.

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Meet Cris from the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors

Posted January 19th, 2017 by

Say hello to Cris (@Criss02), another member of the 2016-2017 Team of Advisors. Cris is a proud grandparent and a vocal advocate for the ALS community. She sat down with us and opened up about what it’s really like to live with her condition.

Cris recently presented at the ALS Advocacy conference in Washington D.C., and she chatted with us about why raising her voice is so important: “Without our voices things would remain the status quo.”

What gives you the greatest joy and puts a smile on your face?

Family. Just waking up in the morning. Thankful my son and his wife have taken us in so we’re not alone on this journey. So proud of him as a dad, teacher/coach! Seeing my teenage grandson each day with his silly sense of humor, loving kindness and our talks about his day as he lays on my bed. Seeing my granddaughter every day and proud of the woman and mother she has become – we watch our great granddaughter for her while she works. I can’t hold her but I can feed her on my lap and talk and be silly with her, my husband has diaper duty! Such a joy to be able to spend time with an infant, watch her grow, smile and coo as she becomes more aware.

What has been your greatest obstacle living with your condition, and what societal shifts do you think need to happen so that we’re more compassionate or understanding of these challenges?

Without hesitation my greatest obstacle is losing independence. The ability to just get in the car to go shopping, grandson’s football and baseball games or dinner without worrying about weakness, falling or becoming fatigued causing excursion to be cut short for my “driver”. It becomes my main concern when deciding participation in outside activities – consequently I am missing out on events I enjoy.

Ironically, I never hesitate to go to health related advocacy and meeting events (near and far) – perhaps because I’m in a comfortable “safe place” with “my own”. I’m still able to walk short distances without assistance. However it’s unnerving being in the general public subject to constant stares or side glanced looks at my unstable walking. Often wonder if they think I’m intoxicated (which is funny as I don’t drink alcohol) – I’ve jokingly asked if I did drink would it straighten my gait? Upcoming wheelchair usage will undoubtedly escalate social anxiety and more stares.

Public awareness and compassion seems to be insurmountable making the question of on how to further their understanding. My thoughts are start with the young and teens – with the hopes as they grow older they will share compassion. Unfortunately, it seems, unless one has a personal experience with someone with a disease or disability they are complacent. That’s sad.

How would you describe your condition to someone who isn’t living with it and doesn’t understand what it’s like? 

Living with ALS, at least my experience so far, is like feeling your body deteriorate one stiffening muscle spasm and tingling nerve at a time all the while your brain is telling you “it’ll pass”…only it doesn’t. Mornings are the hardest moving a finger at a time, then a toe or legs carefully trying to avoid horrific muscle spasms that hurt after subsiding – as if I had just run a marathon or worked out with weights. The loss of use in one arm/hand (2 years now) was tolerable, although as a graphic designer was career ending – now my good right arm/hand is increasingly becoming deficient – although I can still type with one finger. Having someone cut my food has since altered what I choose to eat in company. The mind will still be active as the body loses every function. I’m one of the fortunate slow progression patients still with use of my weakening legs, although several falls have awakened my denial knowing a wheelchair is in the near future. It will need to be tricked out – a power wheelchair with necessary medical features geared for someone with ALS and total function loss. Eventually I’ll be unable to breathe and may use a breathing device or unable speak and with luck will get an eye gaze communicator. Without all it will be death. There is no cure. But living day to day I do the best I can to make every day count.

If you could give one piece of advice to someone newly diagnosed with a chronic condition, what would it be?

Take your head out of the sand. Denial is not healthy and a waste of precious time! Importantly with any disease, I highly recommend working closely with your specialist or specialized clinic. Ask about clinical trials – early in diagnosis this could be critical for acceptance in a protocol. Research trials, associations, medications, therapies…anything specific to the disease. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or disagree with treatments. Knowledge is key! Get involved in your diagnosis and it’s “your” future.

How important has it been to you to find other people with your condition who understand what you’re going through?

Extremely important to connect with my fellow pALS and their cALS for emotional and knowledgeable support. They alone understand what I’m going through but unconditionally are matter of fact about its reality. My fellow patients are a family of a disease nobody wants.

Meeting pALS who have further and advanced progression but are still active in advocacy, policy changes, clinical research and more have been my inspirations and mentors. I no longer sit on the sidelines and for them I am eternally grateful.

Recount a time when you’ve had to advocate for yourself with your (provider, caregiver, insurer, someone else).

So far I haven’t had a problem and had to advocate with the exception of misdiagnosis for over a year. Since confirmed diagnosis I have been fortunate my specialist is a compassionate ALS advocate and researcher who has encouraged my advocacy and participation in educating others.

What made you want to join the PatientsLikeMe Team of Advisors? 

Participating in causes was barely on my agenda the past 60+ years – which I now feel was completely selfish. I was just working, raising kids and grandkids. However, since my diagnosis I came to realize I wasted precious time when my small voice could’ve been heard somewhere making a difference. When I started a clinical trial protocol I was introduced to PatientsLikeMe and instantly felt a bond with the pALS in my forum and was pleased to have met a few at Advocacy in Washington and was surprised by their openness and requests for information and my story. Quickly I knew I wanted to help in any way possible from my diseases perspective to others who just needed a shoulder or guidance. I am thankful that I have the opportunity to “make a difference” so late in my life.

How has PatientsLikeMe (or other members of the PatientsLikeMe community) impacted how you cope with your condition?

I have a pretty good attitude and honestly know what’s in store but other members who are going through the worse aspects of this horrific disease have helped me accept reality. But, with that reality have helped me understand the journey and that I’m not alone. “It takes a village.”

Why should a patient advocate for patients care, disease specific necessary medical equipment, legislation or clinical trials?

Without our voices things would remain the status quo – healthcare would continue to be impersonal, medical support equipment for specific diseases would go unused, legislators would put clinical trials on the back burner as being too expensive – consequently patients would continue to die. My closing remarks at ALS Advocacy in DC to my state senators and representatives is a sample of my feelings for our “asks” for my incurable disease but could the message could apply to many! “In closing, I do want to remind you – in 75 years ALS has not discriminated with age, gender, race or economic status and will strike unknowingly at any moment. So, next time YOU drop a pen, choke when your drink goes down wrong, get up stiff and unable to move after sitting or laying or you stumble over that blade of grass – maybe you will think about what legislation, clinical trials and medical support you would like in affect if ALS were to invade YOUR body.”

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Patients as Partners: Gus and Maria talk partnering with your caregiver

Posted May 11th, 2016 by

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently introduced the Partnership Principles. They’ve been sharing personal stories about these principles in action to kick-off conversations on partnering with all sorts of people — medical students, clinical trial coordinators, and “normals.” Today, Team of Advisors member Gus along with his wife and caregiver, Maria, share about their special relationship and how they work together as a team.

How has it been managing your dual roles of husband/wife and now patient/caregiver? What is the biggest challenge in this?

Gus: I believe the hardest thing has been always feeling I was in control and didn’t need anyone’s help or assistance. But how the tables have turned, I lean on my wife more than ever before, with the understanding I try every day to be as independent as possible. I truly see how tired my wife gets and how frustrated this illness has made her feel. I respect her time and appreciate everything she does for me. I sometimes push her towards taking a time out and spending time for her. She needs time for herself and to unwind from all of this.

The listening part sometimes gets very difficult, because I see things and don’t communicate them correctly. It’s so difficult and so frustrating because I just want to get up and fix it. I feel like things are getting better, I try so hard to shut my mouth and then listen.

I sometimes feel bad because I want or need help but I don’t want to bother or ask for it. She will always ask me if I need help and I just say no. I feel bothered inside and hurt because she only wants to help me. But I’m working on it every day.

Maria: Gus and I have always worked together. He always tried to make life as comfortable as possible for us all these years. Other than my continuing to work full-time and having to make sure that he has all he needs, my biggest challenge is making sure Gus is getting the proper nutrition and is made as comfortable as possible so that I don’t have to worry too much about him while I’m at work.

What are some new things you’ve learned about each other throughout this?

Maria: Gus is probably impressed with how I’m slowly becoming more patient. Since he has always been the more patient and nurturing one, I am now somehow finding myself being more like him. And I continue to be amazed by his spirit. Even after such a devastating diagnosis as ALS, he was only down temporarily. Although he isn’t able to do very much physically, he continues to be the head and shoulders of our household. He keeps us going strong.

Can you describe the ways you partner? What works and what doesn’t?

Gus: Living on the same page of life, what does this mean? Having an understanding and knowing when to ask for help and doing the simplest things you can do.

Sharing responsibilities sometimes can be tricky. Our bodies may not function but our minds are just fine. Not making a mess and doing your best in every way possible. And no nagging, this is the worst thing possible. And don’t take her or him for granted because we need each other for support and good health. Counting your wins and telling yourself you got this. Sharing your positive thoughts and negative feelings when possible, not holding things inside. Sharing your wins and losses.

Communicating and openness in all ways will make things so much better. I tell my wife everything, good or bad I don’t have anyone else who understands me better than she does.

Maria: Currently I have just been going full speed ahead – on autopilot – dancing as fast as I can. There are a million things I could come up with but I haven’t yet figured out what works and what doesn’t – still trying. My only tip is to continue to stay as informed as possible regarding ALS research and things people have tried to live more comfortably with the disease. Also to help your partner have a better quality of life by trying to find things that will naturally relieve some of the discomfort brought on by ALS.

What’s the most important piece of advice you can give to other couples in your situation?

Gus: The first word that comes to mind is patience (and more patience). There are no right or wrong ways of doing things, it’s just how both of you react and what action or plans have been discussed. First comes the falling or not being able to use your hands or walking without use of a walker. It’s different for everyone, but the most important part of this process would be communicating and understanding each other’s feelings and how this illness will change everything. It’s hard, and very challenging for my wife, coming and going I can only imagine the feeling or heartache she endures. To have compassion and empathy really helps.

Maria: Stay optimistic – one never knows how ALS will progress. We have found that with the proper physical therapy and nutrition (Gus has chosen to go with massage therapy, acupuncture, and a gluten-free diet) he continues to get around using a walker. And if his swallowing or breathing starts to feel compromised, he lets his acupuncturist know and he’s good for a few days.

Final thoughts from Gus: Take every day step-by-step, don’t feel helpless or sadness, your attitude and thoughts create a better environment for both of you and your family. For me it’s called positive in and positive out, every word or action matters and your facial expression matters the most. You must become a good poker player, not showing what’s in your hand. Because when you show discomfort or anger your better half will feel like he or she is to blame. Yes, it’s tough and not easy, but what can you do, go with it and create the best situation possible.

It’s a fact we all struggle with something. No matter what the issues are, they’re important to us. Some of us may have financial debt issues, and others health concerns, and anything else you could think about. When you are ill, sometimes the solutions are a bit more challenging. And that’s where our partners and caregivers come in. The simplest things are now the hardest or a bit more challenging in completing our tasks. Some of us may not have partners or caregivers, so then what? How do we cope with the issues at hand, where do we go for help? Finding the answers to our questions sometimes may be difficult and strenuous. There are many sites and forums that can assist us like PatientsLikeMe, and other blogs sites associated with partners and caregivers.

Families may not have the resources available to them, finding the information provided will make a difference one patient at a time. Finding help and support is vital – every day someone requires assistance. I believe everyone deserves a helping hand when possible, no matter what. So when your loved one becomes ill and funds are low, they need a place and solutions to their questions and concerns. Sending them to a site may not be the answer, but speaking to them makes it better. Just having someone to listen and allowing them to vent their frustrations is so important. It’s our duty as civilized human beings. Giving back to those who can’t and providing the information is key.

 

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Throwback Thursday: Dr. Steve Feldman speaks about psoriasis and medication adherence

Posted August 6th, 2015 by

In honor of Psoriasis Awareness Month, we’re throwing it back to January 2013, when we sat down with Steve Feldman, MD, PhD, and Professor of Dermatology, Pathology & Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. In his interview, he spoke about the challenges for psoriasis patients, as well as the treatment advances that may be ahead. We’ve reposted his entire interview below so you can learn about his research studies on patients’ adherence to topical treatments.

As the founder of DrScore.com, tell us how rating doctors online can improve medical care.

Doctors want to give their patients great medical care. Online ratings can help by giving doctors the feedback they need to know—from patients’ perspectives—such as what the doctor is doing well and what the doctor can do to enhance the quality of care in their practice. www.DrScore.com was designed to help facilitate that feedback while also giving patients a better picture—more transparency—of the quality of care physicians provide, something that wasn’t nearly so easy to do in the pre-Internet era.

What do you think about PatientsLikeMe’s data-sharing platform and openness philosophy?

PatientsLikeMe does a truly wonderful job taking advantage of the capabilities of the Internet to permit data sharing among patients so they can learn from one another. Another extraordinary accomplishment has been to develop ways to combine that data in order to better understand diseases and the benefits and risks of the treatments for those diseases. Openness is a terrific attribute in this Internet age. I am very optimistic about medicine and health care providers and think there’s nothing to hide (and if there were something to hide, it ought to be exposed)!

You’ve done extensive research around treatment adherence. What are the considerations for patients?

Well, as the former Surgeon General put it, medicines don’t work if patients don’t take them. Taking medicine isn’t easy, unless it is a habit. And when a patient starts to use a new medicine, taking it isn’t a habit. Patients forget their medicine, they may be fearful of their medicine, there are just all sorts of reasons why patients don’t always take their medications. I think coming up with a plan, a system, for remembering is helpful. (I keep my own pills in a seven-day dispenser on the dinner table, which works great for me except when my family goes out to eat).

If patients are fearful, they should have an honest discussion with the doctor about it. One thing is certain: patients should be honest with their doctors about how they use their medicines. It does neither the patient nor the doctor any good for the patient to tell the doctor one thing but do something else. If a doctor does prescribe a medicine that the patient thinks is too costly or too risky, the patient should let their doctor know. The doctor wants to know and may be able to change things.

We have a growing psoriasis community. What challenges do psoriasis patients face?

Psoriasis has a huge impact on patients’ lives. It affects how patients perceive themselves, how other people perceive the person who has psoriasis, and, in many cases, how someone with psoriasis thinks they are perceived by others. The lesions aren’t just unsightly; they can be itchy and painful. The condition is caused by an overactive immune system, which can also result in arthritis and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and depression. There are good treatments, but the treatments have their downsides: they may be costly, inconvenient, messy, and risky. One of the biggest challenges is getting educated about all the potential options. It isn’t easy.

In our forum, patients have been discussing whether diet can affect psoriasis. What’s your take?

Well, I don’t know of any particular dietary issues that have been definitively shown to affect psoriasis one way or the other (except perhaps that starvation temporarily improves the disease, probably by inhibiting the immune system). But if a particular patient finds some particular dietary issue that makes their psoriasis worse (or better), they should eat accordingly. Some patients tell me beer and/or wine makes their disease worse or that avoiding gluten has helped. The PatientsLikeMe platform may be helpful in compiling the experiences of many people to see if these are issues for individuals or could truly help patients in general.

Any thoughts on what’s ahead in terms of psoriasis management and treatment advances?

As our understanding of the immune system improves, scientists at drug companies will be developing newer and perhaps better ways of controlling immune diseases, including psoriasis. As our health care system changes to become more cost conscious, there may be greater reliance on low cost treatments, like generic creams and ointments for people with mild disease and more use of phototherapy for people with more severe involvement. And with better data collection—like with PatientsLikeMe—we may develop a better understanding of what works, what doesn’t work, and what risks and benefits our treatments have.

If you’re living with psoriasis, don’t forget to connect with the more than 5,000 members of the psoriasis community at PatientsLikeMe.

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A day in the life of Software Engineer Jacinda Zhong

Posted March 6th, 2015 by

In the last “A day in the life” post, Jonathan shared his story about his son Nolan’s hand injury. In case you aren’t familiar with the series, here’s the scoop. At PatientsLikeMe, we believe in the power of openness, and members frequently share about their health journeys and experiences with different conditions. And since they go above and beyond, the staff at PatientsLikeMe likes to share their own stories to help everyone get to know us, too.

In this edition, Jacinda, a software engineer on the PatientsLikeMe team, introduced herself and spoke about her role, her thoughts on health tech and her passions outside of work. Read her interview below, and don’t forget to check out other posts in the “A day in the life” series.

When did you first hear about PatientsLikeMe? What drew you to join the organization?

I heard about PatientsLikeMe through the Vice President of Engineering, Marcia Nizzari. She is a board member at the arts nonprofit Cantata Singers, which is where I used to work. After I heard about PatientsLikeMe and did some research, I was really drawn to the idea of an application that helps people, instead of technology for technology’s sake. I was also very moved by the founders’ story, and believe that if the leadership has a strong personal connection to the mission, the company becomes more mission-driven, versus financially-driven, which is unfortunately the case with so many technology companies.

Tell us a little about your role as a software engineer. What are some things you’re working on?

I have been working on many different parts of the website, such as quick start and the condition reports. I’ve really enjoyed being able to work in all levels of the stack – from database queries to JavaScript on the client side. I think that is something really great about the PatientsLikeMe engineering team, where the majority of the engineers work on the front and back end. This allows engineers to develop a wide skill set and to contribute to all parts of the site.

You’re one of PatientsLikeMe’s newest employees – in your first few months, what has really stood out to you about PatientsLikeMe?

Similar to what I said above, I really like that PatientsLikeMe is so mission-driven, and wants to change medicine. We are empowering the masses to communicate to each other, and come to conclusions that would not otherwise be reached in the traditional healthcare system. Technology has enabled us to create a platform to facilitate discussion and data-sharing that provides value where the market/patients do not realize they wanted it. It’s almost like we are Apple in some ways, where we are providing a service that the market didn’t know it needed, and only after we show the market what we have to offer, does it realize that it is desired.

We hear you speak French – c’est génial! What else do you do for fun outside of the office?

I am mostly coding in the evenings, but I also salsa dance, and do spin in the winter, and run in the summer. I did competitive ballroom dancing in college, which opened up my world to partner dancing. I started learning salsa in senior year of college, and continued after graduation. Next up is learning some more swing/lindy hop and west coast swing (though as you might have guessed, California is better for west coast swing than in New England).

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Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Lisa

Posted October 27th, 2014 by

A few weeks ago, we kicked off the “Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors” blog series with Dana, a PatientsLikeMe member from New Jersey that is living with bipolar II. And now, we’d like to introduce you to another member of the team – Lisa. 

About Lisa (aka lcs)

Lisa’s recent work experience was to help healthcare providers improve care delivery working for Cerner Homecare, a home health/hospice software solution, and Press Ganey, a patient satisfaction measurement/improvement organization. She is very knowledgeable about providers/systems and the flaws in the system. She was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in 2008, and just recently stopped working as a full time executive due to non-motor PD symptoms like loss of function, mental fatigue and daytime somnolence, and she is now a volunteer at National Patient Advocate Foundation, and a Mom whose daughter just got married in June.

 

Lisa on being part of the Team of Advisors

“When we had our first in-person meeting in Cambridge, we were a group of strangers who had no idea what to expect. We quickly learned we were connected by our common experiences and our passion to improve the patient’s experience. I think we were all surprised that our variety of health conditions gave us much more in common than we anticipated. Our passion and respective experiences made the discussion rich. And the PatientsLikeMe Team made us feel special and like we were part of the team. I think dinner the night of our arrival, before we’d had any formal introductions to each other, lasted over 3 hours and ended only because of fatigue!

Before I was introduced to the history and mission of PatientsLikeMe at a deeper level, I was an advocate and I knew I was benefitting from the community and tools. Learning more about the history of the brothers, the openness of the culture and the passion shared by the formal team has made me an evangelist.”

Lisa’s view on patient centeredness

“Patient centeredness is a new buzz-word in healthcare today. It’s somewhat oversimplified, but at its most basic it is putting the patient at the center of care. This means many things in healthcare: ensuring access to care, engagement of the patient at and between visits in their own care, integrated care across specialties. In research: collaboration among researchers to advance discoveries as the priority, with financial return secondary; finding a better balance between patient safety and speed to market of new discoveries, improving patient participation in clinical trials.”

Lisa’s contribution to researchers at the University of Maryland 

PatientsLikeMe recently invited the University of Maryland (UMD) to our Cambridge office for a three day consortium that kicked off a partnership funded by their PATIENTS program, which aims to collect patient input and feedback on all phases of research, from ideas to published results. For one of the working sessions we invited Lisa to join us remotely, to discuss her journey with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and share her perspective and expertise as a patient. Here’s what she experienced:

“When I was still working, I learned that Parkinson’s affected my ‘public speaking’ ability. So, starting our discussion with a Q&A format helped me feel that it wasn’t presenting but rather just talking with colleagues. Also, speaking ‘as a patient’ meant I didn’t have to pretend…like if the right word didn’t come to me quickly, it was okay. The PatientsLikeMe team made it easy.

I had to work out my thoughts in advance and at first had considered sharing ‘data’ about PD. As I thought further though I realized that they live with data, they don’t live with PD. Instead I tried to share my experience through storytelling, hoping I could bring them into the life of a PWP on a daily basis.

Two things came as a surprise, both out of the questions I was asked by the UMD team. When we opened up the discussion to questions, there was some good discussion about the hurdles of participating in a clinical trial from the patient’s perspective. But then the researchers asked me questions I didn’t expect – not inappropriate, just surprising to me. One [of] the researchers wanted to know how my condition affected my family.

Another asked me, “what would my experience be like if I didn’t have PatientsLikeMe as a resource?” That one made me think. I hadn’t realized that I’d probably have no idea what I didn’t have. I would not know that other patients often have this onset of anxiety in public that they’d never had before. I would not know that there is a skin condition associated with PD. I would have a list of meds I kept and probably wouldn’t be able to go back and see start and stop dates because I wouldn’t have bothered saving that data…..

Patient participation in research is more than recruitment and trial results. I think a patient should participate in the study design process – before the Institutional Review Board approves. Be more creative in the design:

  • Ensure patients who meet the study criteria KNOW about the study – extend your reach to leverage support groups, forums and patients.
  • Ensure patients have ACCESS to the study – if your study requires multiple visits and has a handful of study sites, you’re limiting yourself to a finite number of potential participants.
  • Ensure patients learn about the study RESULTS – we need to know what we did mattered so we’re inspired to do it again, so we’re inspired to tell others.

For the PD community, a recent study found that only 1 in 10 patients with Parkinson’s disease have participated in a trial. PARTICIPATE! My experience is that YOU have to go find them. Sure, if you see a doctor in an academic setting, you’ll see flyers posted on the bulletin boards about trials (your provider may or may not mention to you). PatientsLikeMe has a clinical trials tab (did you know that?). PD has Fox Trial Finders and I suspect there are other condition specific registries. Or go to http://clinicaltrials.gov/ and search a database of private and public clinical trials. Together we can all help each other and ourselves!”

More about the 2014 Team of Advisors

They’re a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members who will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process.

So where did we find our 2014 Team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The Team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions.

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PatientsLikeMe launches “Data for Good” campaign to encourage health data sharing to advance medicine

Posted March 10th, 2014 by

Public Service Announcement-Style Video Calls Patients to
“Donate Your Data for You. For Others. For Good”

CAMBRIDGE, MA – March 10, 2014 – Today, PatientsLikeMe kicks off a new campaign promoting the value of sharing health information to advance research. In a series of public service announcement-style videos, the company highlights a movement called “data for good,” which underscores the power of donating health data to improve one’s own condition, help others and change medicine.

“This year marks the 10-year anniversary of when our co-founders first introduced the idea that openness in healthcare is a good thing, and should be encouraged and celebrated,” says Michael Evers, Executive Vice President of Marketing and Patient Advocacy at PatientsLikeMe. “The ‘data for good’ campaign is our way of tipping our hats to the massive amounts of data that our members have shared to date. It’s also meant to inspire more people to contribute their experiences to accelerate research.

In the video series, PatientsLikeMe co-founder Jamie Heywood walks people through the journey of being diagnosed with a life-changing condition and frames the underlying problem in creating a patient-centric healthcare system. He then asks everyone to participate in a movement around health data donation – “join us in this amazing journey to make your data, your experience drive medicine”.

This campaign launches on the heels of a recent paper published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) highlighting a PatientsLikeMe survey focused on people’s willingness to share health information to change medicine.  According to survey results published in the paper, 94% of U.S. adult social media users with a medical condition agree with sharing their health data to help patients like them and should be used to improve the care of future patients.

“Sharing helps me track important health information and improve research about this disease. If I am willing to be transparent, hopefully others will be inspired to do the same,” says Starla Espinoza, a member of PatientsLikeMe since 2008, joining just months after her multiple sclerosis diagnosis. Starla represents one of more than 250,000 members who are donating their disease data to research on PatientsLikeMe. To date, the community has contributed more than 21 million structured data points about their disease experiences including treatment and symptom reports, demographic information, health outcome surveys, lab data and more. In a recent study focused on sleep issues, PatientsLikeMe was able to pull more than 5-years worth of data to analyze from its platform – including over 184,000 symptom reports previously shared by 65,000 chronically ill patients. The company then ran an additional survey to collect more data and received 5,000+ responses in less than two weeks.

PatientsLikeMe’s “data for good” campaign will blanket all of its social media channels and invite people to join the movement (#dataforgood).  “Your data has a heartbeat that gives new life to medical research and a better future to someone like you,” says Heywood.

Anyone can join PatientsLikeMe and share their experiences to help others while helping themselves. To learn more, go to www.patientslikeme.com/dataforgood.

 

About PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 250,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 40 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.