2 posts tagged “WHO”

World Health Day 2017: #LetsTalk about depression and mental health

Posted April 7th, 2017 by

World Health Day 2017

Today is World Health Day! This year, the World Health Organization (WHO) hopes to spark discussions about mental health with their campaign called “Depression: Let’s talk.”

Depression affects more than 300 million people of all ages, from all walks of life, in all countries – but less than half of people with depression (even less than 10 percent in many countries) receive treatment.

“The stigma surrounding mental illness, including depression, remains a barrier to people seeking help throughout the world,” according to WHO. “Talking about depression, whether with a family member, friend or medical professional; in larger groups, for example in schools, the workplace and social settings; or in the public domain, in the news media, blogs or social media, helps break down this stigma, ultimately leading to more people seeking help.”

In honor of World Health Day, WHO encourages you to use the hashtags #LetsTalk and #depression, as well their predesigned apps and graphics to spread awareness over social media today.

World Health Day 2017

Don’t go it alone

WHO suggests talking to someone you trust about your feelings. “Being emotionally mature and authentic to those who are close to you can be an absolute game changer,” says Matthew Johnstone, a writer/illustrator who produced this video for WHO called “I had a black dog, his name was depression.” “The most important thing to remember is that, no matter how bad it gets, if you take the right steps, talk to the right people, ‘black dog days’ will pass.”

So who are the “right people” to talk to? The University of Michigan Depression Center (UMDC) says it’s important to discuss your depression with your healthcare providers. “Emotional problems such as depression are not always evident to healthcare professionals focused on physical ailments,” they say. When you make a list of topics to raise with your doctor, include your depressive symptoms or mental health concerns, just as you would discuss any physical symptoms disrupting your life. Although doctors and the public rarely discuss it, depression can also go hand in hand with many other health conditions and it’s important to treat.

Beyond doctors, UMDC says whom you share with and how to do it is a personal choice. Their Depression Toolkit outlines some pros and cons of opening up and advice for choosing confidants. “Remember: quality is more important than quantity—even one confidant is a great asset.” Seeking support anonymously through online forums (like our Mental Health and Behavior community) is a good option, they say.

World Health Day 2017

Tips for talking

Heads Up Guys, an organization that’s raising awareness about depression in men, encourages you to think of someone who:

  • You’re comfortable with and trust
  • Is likely to understand
  • Will take your situation seriously

“Keep in mind that it doesn’t have to be an intense conversation that you dread starting,” they say. “It’s helpful to keep things causal – go for a walk, grab a coffee or chat with someone while working.”

These candid conversations starters from Heads Up Guys might help:

  • “I’ve been having a really hard time lately. Getting really stressed out. Mind if I bounce some ideas off you?”
  • “I’ve been feeling off for a while now. Have you ever found yourself in a funk that was hard to get out of?”
  • “I made an appointment with my doctor the other day and he thinks I might be suffering from depression. I don’t really know much about depression – how about you?”
  • “I’m really falling behind on some chores. When are you getting groceries next? Maybe we can go together.”
  • “I want to get out more these days but I don’t have the energy. If you can think of something to do and plan it out, I’ll be more likely to get out of the house.”

If you’re feeling suicidal, talk with someone right away. Speak with a family member, friend or doctor, or dial 911 or one of these hotlines.

On PatientsLikeMe, nearly 39,000 patients have major depressive disorder (MDD). Of those, about 17,000 say MDD is their primary condition. Every day, members talk about symptoms, treatments and ideas for coping with depression in the Mental Health forum, so join the discussion today.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


Know Your ABC’s on World Hepatitis Day

Posted July 27th, 2012 by

Did you know that both hepatitis B and hepatitis C can be transmitted through blood-to-blood contact – but hepatitis B is commonly transmitted through unprotected sex as well?  Also, there is a vaccine available for only one of these forms of hepatitis.  Do you know which one it is? (Answer: hepatitis B)

Because these “silent” infections may not cause symptoms for years, hepatitis B and C are the focus of World Hepatitis Day, which takes place tomorrow, July 28th, and is sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA). (There is another form of this viral infection called hepatitis A, which is typically transmitted through contaminated food or drinking water.)

World Hepatitis Day 2012

The reasons for greater awareness are stark:  the WHO estimates that two billion people have been infected with the hepatitis B virus and approximately 240 million people are living with chronic liver infections. Approximately 600,000 people will die every year from the consequences of hepatitis B.  In addition, there are around 150 million people chronically infected with hepatitis C worldwide, and more than 350,000 die each year from related liver diseases, according to the WHO.

Despite these alarming figures, hepatitis remains poorly understood, and the majority of those infected are unaware.  Should their infections become chronic, people living with either hepatitis B or C are at risk for serious liver complications, including liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.  In some cases, a liver transplant may be required.

You can learn firsthand about these conditions and their complications from our hepatitis patients at PatientsLikeMe.  As of today, 88 patients report hepatitis B, while 299 patients report hepatitis C.  In addition, 522 patients have undergone a liver transplant to replace a diseased liver.

If you haven’t been tested for hepatitis – or you want to know more about the hepatitis B vaccination – talk to your doctor at your next visit.  If you’re living with chronic hepatitis, we invite you to join our supportive community today.