157 posts in the category “Mental Health”

Parkinson’s disease + anxiety/depression: Stigma-busting for Mental Health Month

Posted 5 months ago by

Stress. Anxiety. Depression. Have you experienced any of these along with Parkinson’s disease (PD)? As National Mental Health Month comes to a close, we’re highlighting how common these non-motor symptoms and mental health issues are among people with PD.

Plus, see some new research on the prevalence of feeling demoralized (vs. depressed) with PD, and explore how members of the PatientsLikeMe community try to manage their mental health.

Research shows that the vast majority of people with PD have non-motor symptoms (NMS) — with psychiatric symptoms (like anxiety, depression and psychosis) accounting for 60 percent of NMS in one large-scale study.

“That’s why taking action is important,” says Andrew Ridder, M.D., a movement disorders specialist at Michigan Health. “If you or a loved one has had a new diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, we recommend an immediate evaluation for depression, mood and cognitive problems. Frequent monitoring should also be done throughout the course of the disease.”

Dr. Ridder cites some key stats:

  • About 5 to 40 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease have a clinical diagnosis of anxiety
  • Between 17 to 50 percent of patients with Parkinson’s have depression

“Anxious mood” and “depressed mood” are commonly reported symptoms of PD on PatientsLikeMe. Hundreds of members have reported a diagnosis of PD plus a mental health condition.

Work with your doctor or care team to find treatments that work best for you. Some of the treatments Dr. Ridder mentions for people with PD and depression or anxiety include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as paroxetine or sertraline
  • Serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as venlafaxine
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy or psychotherapy (learn more about types of therapy and finding a therapist)

He also discusses some lesser-known treatments, adjustments to carbidopa-levodopa (Sinemet) regimens (to treat anxiety during “off” times) — as well as some treatments that are not prescribed or advised for people with PD — so check out his full article on PD and mental health (also, check out this video).

Anxiety and Parkinson’s

clinical diagnosis of anxiety is marked by frequent, long-term “feelings of worry, nervousness or unease that may be accompanied by compulsive behavior or panic attacks.” Dr. Ridder says some of these symptoms can be worse or occur only when Sinemet is wearing off, also known as “off times.”

Join PatientsLikeMe to see what members living with PD have shared about their experiences with anxious mood as a symptom (and the treatments they’ve tried) — after joining, click here. Nearly 300 members report having diagnoses of both PD and generalized anxiety disorder.

Depression and PD

“Depression and Parkinson’s have so many similar-looking symptoms that it is hard to tell the difference between them,” Dr. Ridder says. “It’s important to note, however, that depression is not a reaction to the disability. Rather, it seems to be related to the degeneration of specific neurons in Parkinson’s disease itself.”

Both PD and a depression can bring: sadness, pessimism, decreased interest in activities, slowing movements and fatigue. Clinical depression or major depressive disorder is often accompanied with guilt and self-blame, which you don’t often see in Parkinson’s disease depression, Dr. Ridder points out.

Join/log into PatientsLikeMe to explore what other members with PD have shared about their experiences with depressed mood as a symptom (and the treatments they’ve tried for it) here. Also, connect with about 300 members who say they’ve been diagnosedwith both PD and major depressive disorder.

Depression vs. feeling demoralized

New research published in the journal Neurology sheds light on how many people with PD may feel demoralized (and not clinically depressed). Among the 94 study participants with PD, 17 of them (18%) felt demoralized, while 19 of them were depressed.

“Demoralization is a state of feeling helpless and hopeless, with a self-perceived inability to perform tasks in stressful situations,” PsychCentral explains in a report about the new study. “With depression, a person usually knows the appropriate course of action and lacks motivation to act. With demoralization, a person may feel incompetent and therefore uncertain about the appropriate course of action. The two can occur together.”

Study author Brian Koo, M.D., says the distinction is important because “demoralization may be better treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy rather than antidepressant medication, which is often prescribed for depression.”

Get tips to help handle or prevent demoralization in this recent Parkinson’s Foundation blog post.

Let’s not forget stress

Stress refers to “the emotional, psychological, or physical effects as well as the sources of agitation, strain, tension, or pressure.” Stress can manifest itself both physically and mentally, so it’s also important to keep in mind in managing PD.

See how stress affects the PatientsLikeMe community as a symptom, and what members with PD have tried to help manage it. Also, check out the Michael J. Fox Foundation blog posts on 7 Apps for Stress Relief and Wellness and the benefits of low-key calming activities for overall well-being.

Explore the forums

As a logged-in member, click on these links to see what other members living with PD have shared in forum posts about:

And keep in mind that you’re not alone in experiencing these symptoms or conditions.

How have mental health symptoms or conditions affected you along with your PD? Make a comment here or join the community discussions through the links above.

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Lights out: Bedtime tips to help you sleep through the night

Posted 5 months ago by

Do you have a bedtime routine? Sleep is a challenge for many members in the mental health community — over 3,000 PatientsLikeMe members say they have difficulty sleeping through the night.

Establishing a regular bedtime and better sleep hygiene is one way to help manage restless nights. Check out some pointers from around the web, and hear from other members about their nighttime rituals.

Setting aside “worry time” and other sleep hygiene reminders

Along with getting into a consistent sleep-and-wake cycle, building these habits into your nightly ritual might help:

  • Set aside worry time— A few hours before you go to bed, take time to address and contemplate all you have on your mind (vs. letting it keep you up later).
  • Go to bed only when you feel tired enough to sleep
  • Prepare your brain and body for sleep with a signal it’s time to wind down, whether that’s a warm bath, dimming the lights or listening to soothing music
  • Stop screens (phones, tablets and computers) an hour before bedtime. If you can it might be a good idea trying to make sure that none of these devices are in your bedroom. If you’ve just brought yourself something like a new corner TV stand so that you can watch your favourite TV show in bed, then it might be a good idea to see if you can move that into another room. It all depends on whether or not you want to have that better night’s sleep.
  • Skip the book: “I don’t read in bed (that was a hard habit to break — I LOVE reading in bed),” says one member. Beds should be kept for sex and sleep, not reading, watching TV or looking at your phone.

Make your space suit you

  • Research shows the perfect sleep temps are somewhere between 68 and 72 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on your preference. A room that’s too hot or too cold can keep you up at night.
  • Keeping the room as dark as possible helps. Try black out curtains or an eye mask.
  • Invest in a good mattress. Understandably, mattresses aren’t cheap, but the more money you are willing to put into your mattress, the better nights sleep you can expect to get. After months of searching, we recently bought a queen mattress and it is one of the best purchases I have made.
  • Turn that neon alarm clock toward the wall so you don’t know what time it is. Ticking off the minutes can lead to more anxiety about how you’re not sleeping. Suffering from anxiety before bed is not going to help you get to sleep quicker. If this is something that you struggle with then it might be a good idea that you start using something like a CBD product to help you have a better night’s sleep. If this is something that interests you, then you can click here for more information.
  • Some folks swear by white noise machines (with sounds from nature, like frogs or rain). Find the right white noise that works for your, even a fan or air purifier can help.

Long before lights out: Tips to keep in mind throughout your day

It’s not only about what you do right before you hit the hay — see how other actions throughout your day can help (or hurt) your sleep quality at night.

Exercise

Yoga or other types of relaxation exercises, like mindfulness meditation can make falling asleep easier, but some members go for something more rigorous..

  • “Another thing that helps is getting pretty serious exercise (1 hour of heart rate at or above 130, for me at least) five or six days a week,” says a member. “That’s not possible for everyone, but it definitely helps me.”
  • “I made the mistake of going for a run too late in the evening,” says a member. It only served to rev her up. Now she plans exercise well before bedtime.
  • Scheduling your exercise outdoors during the day can help some people. Sunlight helps establish your body’s sleep and wake cycles.

Eating and drinking

Drinking alcohol, which you might think will help put you out, actually has the opposite effect, and after a late night cocktail you can find yourself tossing and turning at 3 a.m.. Here are a few more pointers on food and drink from members

  • One member says skipping caffeine including coffee, tea and chocolate after 12:00 p.m. works best for her.
  • Eating meals at regular times also helps your sleep. “None of this dinner at 10 p.m. stuff, which can keep you up,” says a member.
  • “I know some folks who have had luck with Valerian extract, several drops on a sugar cube,” says another member. (Be sure to check with your doctor before trying Valerian or any other herbal remedy.)

Write it down

  • “When I write by hand in my journal every night, it is easier for me to just ‘word vomit.’ Of course, I can’t read anything I write afterwards, so it’s more an exercise of getting the feelings of the day out so I can go to sleep,” says another member.
  • “Writing is part of my bedtime routine, and includes my ‘gratitudes’ for the day, which I also find helps me wake up with a positive attitude in the morning,” a member explains.
  • You may find it helpful to go one step beyond just setting aside worry time (mentioned above) and writing it down or talking to a friend before settling in for the night.

Interested in joining the conversation about bedtime habits and sleep? Log in or join PatientsLikeMe.

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