16 posts from October, 2014

Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Lisa

Posted October 27th, 2014 by

A few weeks ago, we kicked off the “Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors” blog series with Dana, a PatientsLikeMe member from New Jersey that is living with bipolar II. And now, we’d like to introduce you to another member of the team – Lisa. 

About Lisa (aka lcs)

Lisa’s recent work experience was to help healthcare providers improve care delivery working for Cerner Homecare, a home health/hospice software solution, and Press Ganey, a patient satisfaction measurement/improvement organization. She is very knowledgeable about providers/systems and the flaws in the system. She was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in 2008, and just recently stopped working as a full time executive due to non-motor PD symptoms like loss of function, mental fatigue and daytime somnolence, and she is now a volunteer at National Patient Advocate Foundation, and a Mom whose daughter just got married in June.

 

Lisa on being part of the Team of Advisors

“When we had our first in-person meeting in Cambridge, we were a group of strangers who had no idea what to expect. We quickly learned we were connected by our common experiences and our passion to improve the patient’s experience. I think we were all surprised that our variety of health conditions gave us much more in common than we anticipated. Our passion and respective experiences made the discussion rich. And the PatientsLikeMe Team made us feel special and like we were part of the team. I think dinner the night of our arrival, before we’d had any formal introductions to each other, lasted over 3 hours and ended only because of fatigue!

Before I was introduced to the history and mission of PatientsLikeMe at a deeper level, I was an advocate and I knew I was benefitting from the community and tools. Learning more about the history of the brothers, the openness of the culture and the passion shared by the formal team has made me an evangelist.”

Lisa’s view on patient centeredness

“Patient centeredness is a new buzz-word in healthcare today. It’s somewhat oversimplified, but at its most basic it is putting the patient at the center of care. This means many things in healthcare: ensuring access to care, engagement of the patient at and between visits in their own care, integrated care across specialties. In research: collaboration among researchers to advance discoveries as the priority, with financial return secondary; finding a better balance between patient safety and speed to market of new discoveries, improving patient participation in clinical trials.”

Lisa’s contribution to researchers at the University of Maryland 

PatientsLikeMe recently invited the University of Maryland (UMD) to our Cambridge office for a three day consortium that kicked off a partnership funded by their PATIENTS program, which aims to collect patient input and feedback on all phases of research, from ideas to published results. For one of the working sessions we invited Lisa to join us remotely, to discuss her journey with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and share her perspective and expertise as a patient. Here’s what she experienced:

“When I was still working, I learned that Parkinson’s affected my ‘public speaking’ ability. So, starting our discussion with a Q&A format helped me feel that it wasn’t presenting but rather just talking with colleagues. Also, speaking ‘as a patient’ meant I didn’t have to pretend…like if the right word didn’t come to me quickly, it was okay. The PatientsLikeMe team made it easy.

I had to work out my thoughts in advance and at first had considered sharing ‘data’ about PD. As I thought further though I realized that they live with data, they don’t live with PD. Instead I tried to share my experience through storytelling, hoping I could bring them into the life of a PWP on a daily basis.

Two things came as a surprise, both out of the questions I was asked by the UMD team. When we opened up the discussion to questions, there was some good discussion about the hurdles of participating in a clinical trial from the patient’s perspective. But then the researchers asked me questions I didn’t expect – not inappropriate, just surprising to me. One [of] the researchers wanted to know how my condition affected my family.

Another asked me, “what would my experience be like if I didn’t have PatientsLikeMe as a resource?” That one made me think. I hadn’t realized that I’d probably have no idea what I didn’t have. I would not know that other patients often have this onset of anxiety in public that they’d never had before. I would not know that there is a skin condition associated with PD. I would have a list of meds I kept and probably wouldn’t be able to go back and see start and stop dates because I wouldn’t have bothered saving that data…..

Patient participation in research is more than recruitment and trial results. I think a patient should participate in the study design process – before the Institutional Review Board approves. Be more creative in the design:

  • Ensure patients who meet the study criteria KNOW about the study – extend your reach to leverage support groups, forums and patients.
  • Ensure patients have ACCESS to the study – if your study requires multiple visits and has a handful of study sites, you’re limiting yourself to a finite number of potential participants.
  • Ensure patients learn about the study RESULTS – we need to know what we did mattered so we’re inspired to do it again, so we’re inspired to tell others.

For the PD community, a recent study found that only 1 in 10 patients with Parkinson’s disease have participated in a trial. PARTICIPATE! My experience is that YOU have to go find them. Sure, if you see a doctor in an academic setting, you’ll see flyers posted on the bulletin boards about trials (your provider may or may not mention to you). PatientsLikeMe has a clinical trials tab (did you know that?). PD has Fox Trial Finders and I suspect there are other condition specific registries. Or go to http://clinicaltrials.gov/ and search a database of private and public clinical trials. Together we can all help each other and ourselves!”

More about the 2014 Team of Advisors

They’re a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members who will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process.

So where did we find our 2014 Team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The Team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions.

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Depression Awareness Month- What does it feel like?

Posted October 26th, 2014 by

Here at PatientsLikeMe, there are thousands of people sharing their experiences with more than a dozen mental health conditions, including 15,000 patients who report major depressive disorder and 1,700 patients who report postpartum depression. What do they have to say? This word cloud has some of the most commonly used phrases on our mental health forum.

It gives you a feel of the many emotions, concerns and thoughts that surround the topic of mental health. But the best way to increase awareness and knowledge, we believe, is to learn from real patients. To help show what it’s like to live with depression, we thought we’d share some of our members’ candid answers to the question, “What does your depression feel like?”

  • “My last depressive state felt like I was in a well with no way to get out. I would be near the top, but oops….down I go. I truly felt that I would not be able to pull myself out of this one. I felt hopeless, worthless and so damn stupid, because I could not be like other people, or should say what I think are normal people.”
  • “It feels like living in a glass box. You can see the rest of the world going about life, laughing, bustling about, doing things, but they can’t see you or hear you, or touch you, or notice you at all, and you cannot remember how to do the things that they are doing, like laughing, and just being ordinary and satisfied with it. You are totally alone although surrounded by people.”
  • “It feels like walking in a dimly lit hallway (or totally black, depending on the severity) with no exit in sight and no one else around.  You keep walking hoping to come to the end, trying to feel along the walls for some sort of door that will take you out of this tunnel, but to no success. At the beginning you feel like there has to be an end or a door of some sort – something to get you out, but as you keep walking, your hopes damper by each step. You try yelling for help, but no one hears you.”
  • “Depression is very much like feeling as if I have no arms nor legs and (what’s left of) my body is upright in the middle of a road on a cold, dark, foggy morning. I can’t run. I can’t walk or crawl. In fact, I have no options. I have no memory of how I came to be there. I know I’m going to die, I don’t know when or exactly how. There’s nobody around who sees me or understands my situation. If somebody gets close by and I scream, they’ll run away in fear. My family has no idea where I am and I’m alone… except for the headlights down the road.”

Can you relate to any of these descriptions? If you’ve battled depression, we encourage you to join our growing mental health community and connect with patients just like you.

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