6 posts tagged “posttraumatic”

Finding others with PTSD

Posted December 5th, 2014 by

Sometimes it’s nice not having to explain yourself to people who don’t really understand what it’s like for you, and to surround yourself with people who just get it. As the PatientsLikeMe post traumatic stress disorder community grows, we’ve heard from our members who are veterans about how important it is for them to connect to other vets.

Here’s a conversation with our Product Manager and former Marine, Sean Horgan and community member, David Jurado (Jrock121). They shared about their struggles returning home after war, and how they missed their rooftop cigar time with the boys.

David shared some personal details about his journey living with PTSD: after self medicating with Jack Daniels and oxycontin, David found help and peace of mind, connecting with other Veterans, communing with mother nature, and stepping up as a role model for others. He now teaches people you can “replace bad memories with good memories” by working through your bucket list.

The beginning of his transformation started with this cute pup, Willett. Named after a service buddy who died in combat, Willett helped David get out of the house and re-engage with society. David is now Executive Director of Companions for Heroes, a company that places shelter dogs with vets living with PTSD.

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Raising awareness on Veteran’s Day

Posted November 11th, 2014 by

Right now, there are almost 22 million American veterans living in the United States, and every one of them has a story to tell. So today, we’re honoring their service by raising awareness for life after the military.

Like many others who are living with chronic conditions, the injuries our military men and women sustain are not always visible. Thousands of veterans are affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 30,000 have been diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) since 2000 and many others are living with depression. Sometimes their symptoms don’t even manifest until many years after their service.

These eye-opening statistics are why we’ve recently announced a new multi-year collaboration with One Mind to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress traumatic brain injury, or both. We’ll work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research.

If you’re looking to learn more about US veterans, head to your nearest book store and grab a copy of “For Love of Country,” Howard Schultz’s and Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s new book (just released on November 4). Check out the video synopsis below:

 

There’s also the Concert for Valor today – it’s a free live event that is being organized on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for veteran’s awareness. If you can’t make it in person, tune in on iHeartRADIO.

If you’re a veteran living with PTS or TBI, you can find others and connect to people who understand what you’re going through on PatientsLikeMe. There are more than 4,000 of members in the Veterans Forum, and every day, veterans are learning more about their health and the best ways to cope. Share a bond, and live better, together.

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“This is a very serious issue” – PatientsLikeMe member Jess shares about her PTSD

Posted August 18th, 2014 by

Talking about past trauma isn’t easy – so we want to say thank you to Jess right off the bat. She’s a PatientsLikeMe member who suffered a TBI, and she recently talked with us about her experiences. Jess walked us through her accident and her diagnosis and went on to explain that even though you may not see visible symptoms, a person can still be suffering on the inside.

Will you tell us about your story and what happened?

On January 11, 2012, when my husband Tim, my daughter Amanda and I left home around 5:45 PM to pick up my friend’s children for church, we had no idea how much our lives would forever be changed. Statistics show most accidents are within 2 miles of your home, but I wonder what statistics are for accidents caused by your neighbor’s teenage daughter.

I was driving and waiting to turn into the development where my friend lives, and as I looked in my rearview mirror, I noticed headlights coming closer and getting brighter. I started yelling to my husband that the car behind us isn’t slowing down. I tried to hit the gas, BANG…I remember seeing the Ford emblem on my steering wheel, then next thing I knew…I was screaming for my daughter and husband. Then my husband jumped out of the car screaming at the other driver. All the while I’m stuck in the car and nobody realized how bad my injuries really were. My husband comes back to our car saying Jessie, it’s our neighbors daughter. My heart sank.

The EMTs called for the “Jaws of Life,” but I apparently wouldn’t have that with our daughter there, so they somehow relieved pressure and got me out.

I was taken to the nearest hospital, where I was diagnosed with a concussion, neck and back injuries and sent home that same evening. Yes, same evening. The doctor instructed me to follow up with my primary within two weeks if I felt no improvements. So here’s where it’s gets interesting: went to primary within in couple days because I wasn’t improving, and I was referred to neurologist and physical therapy.

I met with neurologist, and this would be the first time I would hear the term that would haunt me forever: Post-Concussion Syndrome. I was officially diagnosed, and I feel it’s been a downward spiral since. I started PT shortly after, all the while I had perforated my colon during the collision and was never checked. It leaked for 4 weeks until it finally ruptured and I went into septic shock at home. The surgeon said if my husband wasn’t home my daughter may have come home from school to find me lifeless in the bathtub. So the PT and head injury took a backseat to the rupture. That took many months of recovery, and my husband even put a temporary bedroom in our dining room because I wasn’t able to go upstairs to bed. That was the worse pain I ever experienced in my life.

I know I’m getting a bit winded here but there’s just so much to my story, all because of a 17 year old driving while on a device…

Once I recovered from the rupture, the neurologist and therapists discovered how severe my other injuries truly were/and still are today. I’ve been diagnosed with Post-Concussion Syndrome, PTSD, vision issues, dizziness, short-term memory issues (which my last evaluation showed was severely impaired), and tremors, which we are hoping isn’t Parkinson’s. These are just a short list because I can’t remember all of them at the moment.

How has that changed you and your family’s lives?

This has changed everything! I was supposed to be going to school to be a dentist at this point. It’s sad how somebody else can control your destiny for you and completely mess you up forever. I have God awful mood swings! I’m not the person I used to be, someone who my husband could count on that he could tell me a list of things to get done in a day’s time and I’d remember to do them. He doesn’t like me to cook when I’m home alone because I forget things are cooking and walk away from them on the stove. I’m only 41 years young and trapped in the mind of a 90 year-old sometimes. This injury has put a lot of pressure on my husband to not only provide for us but to worry about me and my health. He knows my health is never going to get better, and there’s always the fear of the long-term issues with head injuries. The unknown. All because of a 17-year kid, I’m sorry to keep saying it, but sometimes I can’t believe it myself.

What are some ways you cope with your conditions?

I cope with my conditions by leaning on my husband, he makes me laugh a lot! I cry a lot. I would like to speak out more about not driving while on a device but I’m working on it. I’ve done therapy but I didn’t feel as though the therapist “got it,” if you know what I mean. I’m learning every day to cope with my condition and so are my family members. It’s harder for them since this is a harder injury to see.

What is a good day for you, what’s a bad day?

I wake up every day hoping is this the day I will be “normal” again? A good day is when I can fully function without snapping or flipping out on my loved ones, when I can actually complete a full grocery shopping trip in one trip, when I have the energy to do laundry and make beds, and when my vision issues don’t act up to the point where I can’t see.

My bad day, I feel I could dig my own grave and lay in it forever, when the ringing in my ears is so terrible (like this very minute) I have to drown it out with white noise just to sleep, when I have to take medication to sleep every night so I get brain rest otherwise, I only get 2 hours of sleep, the worst day is when I’m falling a lot and so dizzy it’s like the drunk spins but without the party.

What do you want others to understand about living with PTSD and TBI?

The one thing I would like people to understand about PTSD is it’s not something to brag about having, it’s not glamorous, this is a very serious issue. I have panic attacks, nightmares and terrible anxiety sometimes so bad I won’t leave my house because I want to avoid getting back into the car again.

I want people to understand about TBI. Think of it this way: go home, turn on every television in your home full-blast, radio same thing, have your kids play around you really loud, and have flashing lights – now get on the phone and try to pay attention. You can’t. That’s what’s it’s like to have a TBI for me. I can’t filter things out, it’s really hard to. Sometimes I just need a quiet break.

To sum it up for both, please don’t judge a book by its cover, it may be masking a bigger issue. I hide my symptoms a lot more often than I should. Just because you can’t see the injuries doesn’t mean I’m not screaming on the inside.

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Keeping up awareness for PTSD

Posted June 27th, 2014 by

 

Back in the beginning of June, we posted about PTSD Awareness Month, and now, we’re keeping the awareness going strong for PTSD Awareness Day. To help put a face on PTSD, we shared a bunch of videos from AboutFace, a website produced by the National Center for PTSD that’s all about telling real stories of veterans living with the condition. To get a different perspective, we also thought we’d share a few of their video interviews with clinicians. Here are some to check out…

 

Stephanie Dove
Social worker

My advice to you- “I meet a lot of veterans who don’t want to come to the VA for treatment … because they’re afraid of the stigma. PTSD is a normal, understandable reaction to the experiences that many veterans have been through…”

Dr. Ron Acierno
Clinical Psychologist

How to know you’re ready for help- “Well, if you wait, you’re never going to be ready. Getting ready for treatment is like ‘how do I know I’m ready to get in better shape?’ If you’re feeling pain, you’re ready for treatment.”

Dr. Sonya Norman
Clinical Psychologist

What treatment can do for you- “Feeling better can mean so many different things to different people. For some people enjoying their marriage again, enjoying their family …. it could ‘I’m just enjoying life again.’”

And just this month, One Mind and PatientsLikeMe announced a new multi-year collaboration to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress (PTS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both. The two organizations will work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research. Check out full the collaboration announcement.

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for PTSD Awareness Day.

 


“I know that it will pass eventually” – PatientsLikeMe member Jennifer shares about her PTSD

Posted June 6th, 2014 by

June is National Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month, and recently, Jennifer (aka sortaborderline) spoke about her personal experiences with the neurological condition. She talked all about learning to roll with her triggers, leaning on her family and PatientsLikeMe members for support, and recognizing the relationship between her fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) and PTSD. Check out her full interview below.

 

What went through your mind when you were first diagnosed with PTSD?

I already thought that PTSD was the problem, but it was such a relief to know that I wasn’t “losing my mind.” I have a legitimate disorder, not something that I can wish away or just “try harder” to ignore or push through. I actually felt empowered. Now I knew for sure what was going on, so I could work on treating it. Putting a name to the disorder really helped take a lot of the fear out of it for me. When I am triggered, I know why and I know that it will pass eventually. Just that little bit of information gives me so much more power over it as opposed to before when I didn’t know what was happening.

What have you learned about living with PTSD in the years following your diagnosis?

For the most part, I have learned to roll with it. Not that it is easy or that learning that hasn’t been difficult. I have learned that it is okay to share with my support system when I am triggered and ask for help getting myself back to center. I have learned that it is okay to share how I am feeling with my husband. That was a big step for me. Not because he hasn’t always been supportive of me, he has. Because of my particular issues, it is difficult for me to trust people with my unfiltered self. I’ve learned that I can with him, and it has helped strengthen my marriage immeasurably. People on the Mental Health board at PatientsLikeMe have been incredibly helpful and supportive of me and I know that no matter how bad it gets, I can pour it out on the page in my journal and be supported. For one thing, it can be cathartic to get it all out on the page. For another, it helps me to get feedback. Sometimes all it takes is someone reminding you of the coping skills I have to help me get my bearings.

In addition to PTSD, you’re also living with fibromyalgia and ME/CFS – do you notice a relationship between your conditions? How does one impact the other?

My diagnoses are essentially intertwined. One can trigger the other. If someone is having a long or particularly painful ME/CFS flare, that can make a neuro-typical person anxious. For a person with an anxiety disorder, that is amplified. The pain from the ME/CFS is exhausting. All of those pain signals bombard your brain for days on end, and your brain gets tired. It makes it difficult to think, resulting in the bane of the CFS/ME sufferers’ existence, the dreaded fibro-fog. It is very difficult and emotionally draining, not to mention the effect it has on your sleep. It is difficult to use learned coping skills when you’re exhausted.

On the flip side, anyone with an anxiety disorder can tell you that there are physical symptoms when you’re triggered. With ME/CFS, that is amplified as well and can trigger a flare. Which can amplify the anxiety trigger. It can be viciously cyclical. Sometimes, I just have to rest. There is nothing else to be done. Rest, a good diet, and hydration are the best thing to break it sometimes. If anything, I have learned to pay attention to subtle changes in my body or mood so that I can try to mitigate flares and triggers whenever I can.

You mention a “normal” mask on your PatientsLikeMe profile – can you share what means for you?

I am a mother of two children, I am a wife, a daughter, an aunt, and a granddaughter. I am trying to build a career and lead a full life. People depend on me. I have to “fake it until I make it” a lot of the time. It is difficult. It is nice to be able to take off that mask and be frank about what I am dealing with in the safety of the PatientsLikeMe Mental Health forum. I truly believe the help and camaraderie that I have found there has helped me to maintain a stability that I didn’t have before I found it. I feel much less alone in my struggle, even when in mid-episode, and as much as my “in person” support system is helpful, sometimes you just need to talk to someone who has been where you are. It is indispensable.

How have the connections you’ve made with others in the PatientsLikeMe community helped you to take that mask off?

I am not afraid of my symptoms anymore. I am not afraid to let my feelings out a bit more. I am not afraid to reach out and ask for help, nor am I afraid to offer help to others. Even a little note of support can help pull someone back on the path they want to be on. People on the forum have done it for me so many times. Having a cheering section helps you get the strength together to keep fighting. I know that, and I offer as much support as I can to other members because it matters. I feel like I matter. Even when my symptoms are at their worst and I feel weak and small, I know that a note of support to someone else matters. Sometimes when you can’t bring yourself to matter to yourself, mattering to others can keep you going until you can.

What advice would you give to someone who has just been diagnosed with PTSD?

Don’t be afraid. Don’t let negative stigma regarding mental illness keep you from getting help. Our disorders are just as valid as physical illnesses. They need treatment in order for us to function and live our lives. Therapy was absolutely essential to getting me stabilized. It truly helped me to manage my disorders and start living again. If you don’t “click” with the first therapist, try another. When you find the right fit and do some hard work, it will make a huge difference for you.

I have found the tracking tools on PatientsLikeMe to be immensely helpful, especially in the beginning, for tracking symptoms to see if there are patterns in my triggers and symptoms, which has helped direct my therapy and coping techniques. The medication tracker has been helpful as I am one of those super fortunate folks who seem to have a proclivity toward weird side effects from medications. That way I can remember what we have tried and how it worked. Visit the forum. Check out my journal if you want, it’s public. There are folks who have just hung out and read the forum for months before joining in, and that is okay. It helps to see that others think like you and understand what you’re dealing with.

Most importantly, don’t give up. It can get better.


Putting a face on PTSD

Posted June 4th, 2014 by

The National Center for PTSD has named June Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month, and over the next few weeks, we’ll all be learning, connecting and sharing about it to better help everyone living with the neurological condition.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 7.7 million adults are living with PTSD in the U.S., and although it affects many military veterans, anyone can experience post-traumatic stress at any age.1 There is no known cure, but it’s usually treated through psychotherapy, medications or sometimes a combination of both.

So, who are some of the millions that are living with PTSD, and what are their stories? Here are just a few from AboutFace, a website produced by the National Center for PTSD that’s all about telling real stories of veterans living with the condition. Click on any of the images to hear what they have to say.

Mary C. “Katie” Weber
US Army (1993 – 1995)
PFC, Transportation Management Coordinator
Germany


When I knew I needed help-I was suffering in silence. I was allowing myself to become more and more depressed … so much so that my family became extremely concerned and suggested that I go to the VA.”

Bill Talbott
US Air Force (1967 – 1971)
Sgt, Morse Code Intercept Operator
Philippines, United States, Vietnam


How I knew I had PTSD– “I was constantly moving … always had bad dreams, hitting walls, putting holes in walls. I just couldn’t control myself.”

Tyler Jones
US Marine Corps (2002 – 2006)
CPL, Military Police
Iraq, United States


Why I didn’t ask for help right away– “I think there’s a stigma attached to it … for me, it’s feeling like I’m not a real marine.”

What can you do to help during PTSD Awareness Month?

And if you’ve been recently diagnosed with PTSD, you’re not alone. Join members like you today and connect with people who know what it’s like.

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1 http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml#part6