2 posts tagged “poor circulation”

Circulation issues & ALS

Posted July 3rd, 2018 by

Do you have circulation issues like swelling (also called edema) or a burning (or cold) sensation in your legs and feet? How do you cope? From compression stockings to therapeutic massage and limiting salt intake, pALS are managing their circulation issues in some creative ways.

Why do some people with ALS experience poor circulation?

For many people living with ALS walking becomes difficult as their condition progresses. Lack of physical activity can make it difficult for the blood to reach the legs, feet, arms and hands, leading to poor circulation and swelling (some PatientsLikeMe members report swelling in their feet and hands). Swelling is also caused by dehydration, inflammation or consuming too much salt.

Some symptoms include:

  • Swelling or puffiness in legs, arms, hands or feet
  • Stretched and/or shiny skin
  • Skin that stays depressed after being pressed
How pALS manage:

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms above, talk to your doctor. He or she may prescribe a diuretic (or water pills, to help rid your body of excess salt and water) but diuretics should be used with caution since many pALS are already dehydrated. Here are a few things some pALS are trying:

  • Electric blankets or hand warmers like the ones used for hunting
  • Ted Hose or compression socks (if you’re still walking) to prevent blood clots
  • Leg massage devices like this one or this one to get the blood flowing
  • Kathy Peters, Muscular Dystrophy Associations’s ALS Health Care Services Coordinator, warns that an ordinary reclining armchair can actually lead to more swelling. Instead, she recommends raising your feet (with a tilt-in-space wheelchair and hospital bed) so they’re on the same level or higher than your heart.
  • For more tips, check out this blog post about managing swollen feet.

How do you manage circulation issues? Any questions, thoughts or tips you’d like to share with the community? Join PatientsLikeMe and add your voice to the conversation.

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What Does It Mean When You Have Cold Legs?

Posted February 27th, 2011 by

Do you wonder if your cold legs could be a sign of something?  Sensations of coldness in the extremities – such as the feet and toes – may be the result of poor circulation, neurological disorders or temperature dysregulation.

At PatientsLikeMe, where more than 120,000 patients are sharing their experiences with conditions, symptoms, treatments and more, approximately 137 patients report cold legs below the knee.  The majority rate this symptom as either “moderate” (42%) or “severe” (31%).   Interestingly, many of these patients list their primary condition as ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) or multiple sclerosis (MS), showing that this disconcerting symptom is common in these two neurological diseases (both of which can impair mobility).

Two treatments that our patients report for cold legs are a powered wheelchair and a handicap/disabled parking permit.  What have you tried?  If you’ve experienced cold legs yourself, we encourage you to share your experiences to help other patients.  PatientsLikeMe’s unique data-sharing platform allows you to share detailed data about all types of treatments, interventions and lifestyle modifications that have helped you or simply had no effect.

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Got something you’d like to tell others who are experiencing cold legsJoin PatientsLikeMe and add your experiences to our growing body of knowledge.  Then, stay to exchange support and advice, research common treatments and learn from other patients like you.

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