54 posts tagged “patients”

PatientsLikeMe and M2Gen Announce Partnership and Plans for Landmark Cancer Experience Study

Posted March 8th, 2016 by

 

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. & TAMPA, Fla., March 8, 2016—Patient network PatientsLikeMe® and informatics solutions provider M2Gen® are collaborating to give patients and researchers a more complete picture of patients’ experiences with cancer treatments and to shed new light on the factors that may affect outcomes and quality of life.

The partnership aims to advance cancer research by combining real-world, patient-reported outcomes shared by members of PatientsLikeMe with the molecular and clinical data shared by patients enrolled in the Total Cancer Care® program at Moffitt Cancer Center and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center –

Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James). The combined dataset will give researchers a broader, longitudinal view of the many factors that affect patient outcomes.

The collaboration’s initial study is expected to kick off within the next several months and to focus on lung cancer. Researchers will analyze and explore the typically distinct forms of data to generate new insights into the patient experience and value of treatment plans for those undergoing care. The study is funded by PatientsLikeMe partners AstraZeneca and Genentech, a member of the Roche Group.

“As we continue to expand our real-world measurement system, we want to ensure we’re giving patients access to all of the information needed to help guide their care decisions,“ said PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter. “By integrating data from multiple sources, we’ll be able to get, and give, a more comprehensive picture of disease and patients’ experience managing it.”

Moffitt Cancer Center and OSUCCC – James are founding members in the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN), a unique research partnership among the country’s top cancer centers. M2Gen guides ORIEN’s operations and strategy. Dr. William (Bill) S. Dalton, Founder and CEO of M2Gen, said the collaboration will help guide how cancer care evolves.

“This partnership brings together everything we need to better understand the patient, identify unmet needs, and use that insight to develop better technology, treatments and care protocols,” said Dalton. “We ultimately hope it provides the tools and information patients and their doctors will use to make treatment decisions that are tuned to patients’ life goals and treatment preferences.”

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services, and care. With more than 400,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 70 research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

About M2Gen
M2Gen is Moffitt Cancer Center’s wholly owned, for-profit, informatics solution subsidiary advancing personalized medicine by using high quality tissue, clinical data and molecular technology to accelerate the discovery and delivery of personalized medicine. Using a rapid learning approach, the goal of M2Gen is to accelerate the science of precision medicine by creating evidence and knowledge-based solutions that identify a patient’s susceptibility to disease, predict how the patient will respond to a particular drug, and match patients to the best therapies for an optimal treatment outcome. M2Gen, along with Moffitt and partnering community hospitals, has created a large, cancer-focused biorepository linked to clinical and molecular data. For more information visit www.m2gen.com

About the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN)
The Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN) is a unique research partnership among North America’s top cancer centers that recognize collaboration and access to data are the keys to cancer discovery. Through ORIEN, founders Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute in Columbus leverage multiple data sources and match patients to targeted treatments. More information is at http://www.oriencancer.org/.

About the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute
The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only four centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs. As the cancer program’s 306-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, visit www.cancer.osu.edu.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


Your data doing good: The Lithium study

Posted December 18th, 2015 by

During #24DaysofGiving this December, we’re highlighting all the good your health data donations are doing. And this time, we’re starting at the beginning. 

As you probably know already, PatientsLikeMe launched its first community in 2006 for people living with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Two years later, we had an amazingly engaged and research-focused community who were willing to share data to change what the world knows about ALS. This neurodegenerative condition is fatal and takes away people’s ability to walk, speak, use their arms, and eventually breathe. This is exactly what happened to our founders’ brother, Stephen.

So, in 2008, when the results of an Italian clinical trial were published in a highly respected scientific journal saying that the use of lithium carbonate could slow the progression of ALS, we had a member community that was hungry to learn more. Spearheaded by two very involved members – a Brazilian ALS patient named Humberto and a caregiver in the US named Karen – we set out on a journey to collect and analyze thousands of patients’ real-world data to understand how lithium carbonate was working beyond the clinical trial setting. The result was unexpected and unmatched in the world of medicine.

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Your data doing good: A collaboration with Walgreens

Posted December 13th, 2015 by

During #24DaysofGiving this December, we’re highlighting all the good your health data is doing within – and well beyond – the PatientsLikeMe website. Here’s another great example. Did you know the side effect data you report on your PatientsLikeMe treatment evaluations is helping pharmacy customers understand how the medications they take may affect them, too?

It started back in February this year when we kicked off a new collaboration with Walgreens, the nation’s largest drugstore chain. The idea was simple; by joining forces, we could help bring your experiences to many more people making treatment decisions. Now anyone researching a medication or filling a prescription on Walgreens.com can see a snapshot of how PatientsLikeMe members have been impacted by that medication, including side effects and their severity. There are currently about 6,000 medications at Walgreens pharmacies where others can learn from your experiences, and the data (de-identified!) is updated daily based on what you report on PatientsLikeMe.

This partnership marks the first time a company has displayed your real-world data on their website. Why did they do it? Because your data and experiences can help patients, wherever they are, understand more about the treatments they’re taking, and make more informed health decisions. Our partners understand and recognize that.

Here’s another reason (one you can probably relate to). To find side effect information for a treatment, you normally have to scour the Internet or read that sheet of paper that gets stapled to your prescription bag. (Does anyone really read that?) But information like that only represents a tiny fraction of the population, usually just a few hundred or at most a few thousand who took part in the clinical trial for the treatment. The thing is, you might be taking the treatment off-label. In fact, more than one in five outpatient prescriptions written in the U.S. are for off-label uses, and 75 percent of these uses have little or no scientific support[1]. This means the treatment may affect people a little bit differently. So having real-world experiences like yours gives a broader picture for people trying, or deciding to try, that treatment.

The next time you record a treatment evaluation, know that you’re doing much more than you think. By sharing information about side effects, you’re making it easier for someone else to make a better decision for them. We’re truly better, together.

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[1] Radley DC, Finkelstein SN, Stafford RS. Off-label prescribing among office-based physicians. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(9):1021-1026. doi: 10.1001/archinte.166.9.1021.


RWJF Awards Grant to PatientsLikeMe to Develop New Measures for Healthcare Performance

Posted December 8th, 2015 by

Patient Network to Work with the National Quality Forum to Ensure Patients Drive Healthcare Value  

CAMBRIDGE, MA., December 8, 2015PatientsLikeMe has been awarded a $900,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to help jumpstart changes that will amplify the patient voice in the measurement of healthcare performance.

A portion of the grant funds a collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and the National Quality Forum (NQF) to develop, test and facilitate the broader use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to assess patient-reported health status. While PROMs have been used in clinical research, they are rarely used in routine clinical care to assess provider performance. In such settings, performance is primarily assessed by what was done to the patient (using process measures) and what happened to the patient (using clinical outcome measures), but not always by what may be most important to the patient.

The grant comes as value-based purchasing is gaining ground in both the public and private sectors, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) setting aggressive targets for linking performance related to quality, value and patient-centered care to payment. “Measuring what is relevant, useful and actionable for patients has never been more important,” said PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and President Ben Heywood. “This initiative will help quantify the patient experience at the clinical level, so that real patient outcomes can start to prompt changes in behavior, help tailor care, and improve reimbursement. With it, we’ll start to move the whole system toward more patient-centered care.”

NQF is a not-for-profit, nonpartisan, multi-stakeholder, membership-based organization that works to help advance improvements in healthcare. It evaluates, endorses, and selects measures of quality, safety and cost for accountability. The collaboration with PatientsLikeMe is one of several that are part of NQF’s new Measure Incubator, an innovative effort that holds the potential to facilitate measure development and testing more efficiently through collaboration and partnership.

NQF’s Chief Scientific Officer, Helen Burstin, MD, MPH, sees the collaboration with PatientsLikeMe as the answer to an urgent need for new measures that can improve health and healthcare outcomes.

We have an abundance of clinical measures, but we need to better incorporate the voice of the patient into performance measurement,” said Dr. Burstin. “We must be able to accurately measure and understand the patient’s day-to-day experience living with pain and fatigue as well as how they are functioning with routine activities to get the full picture. PatientsLikeMe’s inherent focus on patients will move us closer to having the patient voice be the driver and definer of health care value.”

Creating measures that matter to patients became easier in 2013 when RWJF gave PatientsLikeMe a grant to create the Open Research Exchange (ORE), an open-participation platform that allows researchers to connect with PatientsLikeMe’s 380,000 members to create, test and validate new measures. The collaboration with NQF will initially use the ORE platform to ask patients to prioritize measures, then PatientsLikeMe will develop and test them. This process will ensure that when implemented in clinical care settings, the measures broadly show a patient population’s progress and reflect health outcomes that are important to patients that can then be used to assess an organization’s performance and ultimately to determine reimbursement.

About Patient-Reported Outcomes Tools & Performance Measures

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are defined as any report of the status of a patient’s (or person’s) health condition, health behavior, or experience with healthcare that comes directly from the patient, without interpretation of the patient’s response by a clinician or anyone else. Various tools such as questionnaires, scales, or single-item measures that enable researchers, administrators, clinicians and others to assess patient-reported health status for physical, mental, and social well-being are referred to as PRO measures (PROMs). PROMs have been commonly used in clinical research because they are based on patient input, and can help ensure that the treatments developed actually help people feel better and improve symptoms or function. Their application in the clinical care setting is limited, but growing interest among various stakeholders is moving PROMs into more routine use for performance measurement. An example of this is the widely used Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) that screens and monitors the severity of depression. In a clinical setting, PROMs can help monitor patient progress over time at the individual and population level and support shared decision making. A PRO performance measure (PRO-PM) is based on aggregated patient-reported data and is used to assess quality of care for accountable entities, such as hospitals, physician practices or accountable care organizations (ACOs). NQF endorses PRO-PMs for purposes of performance improvement and accountability.

Contact
PatientsLikeMe
Katherine Bragg
kbragg@patientslikeme.com
617.548.1375


Getting “Patients Included” right Part II: Planning a patient-centric event

Posted November 18th, 2015 by

You may remember Part I of this blog that focused on the experiences of two PatientsLikeMe members who attended the Kidney Health Initiative’s (KHI) workshop, “Understanding patients’ preferences: Stimulating medical device development in kidney disease,” back in August. KHI is a partnership between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). We recently spoke with patient Celeste Lee and Frank Hurst, MD, Medical Officer, Renal Devices Branch with the FDA, about the planning and consideration it took to make this event “Patients Included.”

While this was the first patient-centric event KHI has held, they’ve worked to include the patient voice in all aspects of the initiative. Kidney patients and kidney patient organizations are represented on the KHI Board of Directors, and this past year the KHI Board of Directors formed a KHI Patient and Family Partnership Council (PFPC) made up of only patients and their caregivers. The PFPC helps provide strategic guidance on how to engage and include patients, their families and care partners in KHI activities.

Celeste has had kidney failure from an autoimmune disease since she was 17. She’s been an advocate for decades and is now focused on patient-centered care. Celeste is also a board member on the inaugural PFPC and helps review potential projects from a patient and family member viewpoint.

“The way KHI works is that it brings everyone to the table – researchers, industry professionals, patients – and we ask what is it that we can do to improve research and clinical trials and ultimately, patient lives. We do this through specific projects like this workshop,” she says.

Involving patients from the get-go

As part of this particular workshop, KHI wanted to hear patients’ ideas and preferences on new devices to manage kidney disease. Before anything, though, they had to create an event that would provide the greatest value to patients that attended in person.

When we asked Frank and Celeste what goes into planning an event like this  they shared how they think it can be centered around the patient:

“Involving patients early helped us to realize the need to broaden efforts to educate patients on the topics of interest prior to having the workshop. This proved to be a critical step in the planning process,” says Frank.

“We realized it would save time to educate prospective attendees about the new devices via webinars before the workshop,” explains Celeste. “We ended up taking a three-step approach that started with a quick engagement video talking about what we wanted to do. We distributed this throughout the whole kidney community. At the end of the video, there was an invitation to sign up for the webinars. After the webinar we said – now we are going to have a day and a half workshop and we will provide travel grants. Over 50 travel grants were given, funded by KHI so patients could come from all over the country.”

Frank notes, “Although patients are medical device consumers, they rarely have an opportunity to influence products that come to market. The success of a new medical device is based on many factors, including the usability by patients. KHI provided a forum, which allowed stakeholders to hear about ideas and potential solutions directly from patients.”

Looking at it from all angles

While the main consideration was making sure KHI had set clear expectations to patients who attended from the onset, there were additional logistics to consider for the workshop to be as patient-centric as possible. The workshop agenda was arranged around patient treatment schedules and incorporated dietary considerations when planning the menu. Because some attendees are on dialysis or live with transplants, they needed volunteers on hand. KHI planners also made sure to ask for patient feedback throughout the entire event and had scribes in position to record it. This feedback was ready to be shared at the workshop’s closing and will be sent out in an executive summary as well.

“Patients especially enjoyed the small group sessions,” Frank says. “These were multi-stakeholder breakout discussions which tackled important questions such as unmet needs, device areas that need improvement, making clinical trials more patient-friendly, and assessing ways for patients, industry, and regulators to communicate and share feedback.  These sessions included many lively discussions where patients felt empowered to share ideas and come together to propose solutions.”

Patient advice for a patient-centric event

Celeste has simple advice for other organizations that want to have this level of patient inclusion in their events. “I think you start off with a really good planning team that includes patients so that they’re there to help figure out the challenges of bringing that population together. Most importantly – you need to prepare people to be a part of it. You’re not going to get anything of value if people come in cold. It’s about the patient being able to draw on their experiences to help move research forward so if they understand what’s expected of them going in, then the outcomes will be more valuable.”

Frank adds, “It is also important to consider the spectrum of the disease, and ideally include patient representatives from across the spectrum as they could have very different needs.”

“Then,” Celeste says, “the next step is getting them to share the developments within the greater community. Once patients are educated and engaged, they become empowered.”

For a look at the KHI’s 3-step plan, check out this presentation they shared with us! And of course, don’t forget to visit the site and connect with the more than 1,000 other PatientsLikeMe members living with chronic kidney disease.

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Getting “Patients Included” right Part I: Two members attend a Kidney Health Initiative workshop

Posted November 4th, 2015 by

Back in August, the Kidney Health Initiative (KHI), a partnership between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), held a workshop called “Understanding patients’ preferences: Stimulating medical device development in kidney disease.” But this was more than a workshop – it was an event centered around the idea of “Patients Included” – a movement started back in May to involve more patients on the planning committees, stages, and in the audiences of medical conferences.

Sally Okun, our Vice President of Advocacy, Policy and Patient Safety spoke at the event and notes how patient-focused the entire workshop was in that “nearly 100 people among the approximately 150 who gathered for the event were patients living with and managing kidney disease every day, many joined by their caregivers.”

“The patients were very open in the discussions and direct in their questions. Many talked about their experiences with hemodialysis and how difficult it is to live a normal life when one has to be at the dialysis center three days a week for many hours,” she says. “In contrast to the conventional treatment approach, the newer developments for hemodialysis at home were very interesting, and in general, patients felt more in control.”

She concludes, “The KHI did a remarkable job focusing this meeting on patients and their caregivers, and providing resources to cover travel expenses. They should be commended and looked to by others as an example of getting ‘Patients Included’ right.”

PatientsLikeMe members Samantha-Anne (internettie) and Laura (Cherishedone) both received stipends to attend the workshop. We asked them about their experiences and here’s what they said:

Why was it important for you to attend this workshop event?

S: It is important to me as a patient to have a voice in my care and treatment. It was particularly important to me to attend this workshop because I wanted to be a voice for the patient who has not yet arrived at the need for dialysis or transplant and to ask what we can do to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) from progressing if possible. I know that not all cases can be prevented, but there are some that can. In my situation, my CKD was caused by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). If the consequences of using these drugs for such a long period of time had been made clear to me and if I had been offered some alternative treatments I may have made different treatment choices.

L: I have always been strongly committed to advocating for myself and others, and being given the opportunity to participate and then bring back the information to others whose lives are impacted by CKD and/or end stage renal disease (ESRD) equips us with insight to better advocate for ourselves.

Is this the first event like this that you’ve attended?

S: Yes, this is the first time that I was offered the opportunity to have a voice in patient care. It certainly will not be the last.

L: I have attended National Kidney Foundation (NKF) meetings with other patients and also participated on NKF committees (Patient and Family Executive Committee).

How did you feel about the focus on patient-centricity at this event?

S: I was thrilled to know that someone cared about what patients have to say about their own care. I think that with the advent of the Internet and patients having more access to information that they are more involved in their own care. Patients know more and want to know more about what illnesses are affecting their bodies and they also want to know what they can do to prevent some of these conditions from happening in the first place.

L: The patient-centricity was one of the most valuable components of the meeting. I am one to be very involved in giving back, but I would guess that for many, their disease leaves them feeling isolated. For this population to meet others who are not only surviving but thriving is very important. My hope is that many participants were encouraged to not let their CKD/ESRD define them, but rather to use it as a vehicle for being empowered and encouraged to live each day to the fullest extent, not be left feeling like a victim to the disease.

Did you feel like they supported you and listened to you while you were there?

S: I absolutely felt like I was listened to at this workshop. I had an opportunity to talk to so many people on all different levels of health care. I had wonderful conversations with Paul Conway (AAKP), Mark Ohen (Gore), Denny Treu (NxStage), Sally Okun (PatientsLikeMe), Prabir Roy-Chaudhury, MD, (ASN) Frank Hurst, MD (FDA), Francesca Tentori, ME (ARCH), and F.P. Wieringa, PhD (DKF). We all had the shared topic of kidney disease to discuss but I was amazed at how many people I had other areas in common with. Paul Conway knew my new hometown of Waterville, Maine, and Denny Treu was familiar with my former home in Colorado Springs, Colorado. I feel like my love of research and my desire to learn new things and to share my experiences made this conference a catalyst for me to not only offer my view but to be asked to participate in conversations that I would not be privy to otherwise. I felt like I was engaged in the process and made to feel that my opinion was valued.

L: Most definitely!

What stood out to you as an attendee?

S: What stood out to me the most was that these doctors and vendors really wanted to hear what the patients had to say. I never felt like someone was asking for my opinion just to be nice or listening just to be polite. They seemed fully involved in what we, the patients, were saying. Being heard, as a patient, is honestly such a rare thing that to have people in places that can make life-changing decisions about our care hear what we have to say, is amazing.

L: Hearing about research that is ongoing as well as new technologies was very empowering, and left me feeling very encouraged about options available to those of us who have reached ESRD.

What was the most interesting takeaway for you?

S: As a patient the most interesting takeaway was that what I think and what I say really does count. As a person who loves research and used to do surveys and metrics for a living, the most interesting takeaway was that taking the time to craft a meaningful survey for patients is important. Turning data (survey results) into action (making a difference for the patient) is key.

L: Hearing about research that is ongoing for new technologies and ways to treat ESRD was most exciting.

What was it like to be able to interact with other patients who were attending?

S: It always helps to know that you are not alone. Even though we all have our own individual paths and we all fall on different places on the CKD continuum, we all have so much in common in how we feel and how we need to be heard. We can laugh at things that other people just would not understand. Kidney disease is not funny, but there is always some humor to be found in any difficult situation and being with like-minded people is good for the soul. Every single patient in that room is a hero. We all have a lot on our plate but we mustered up the strength to get ourselves to that conference to not only help ourselves but to help all those who come along after us. I know I was completely energized by being around everyone and at the same time could feel the drain of the illness that I deal with every day. It was worth every bit of energy it took to be there in Baltimore and I feel incredibly grateful that I was offered the opportunity to attend the conference. I made sure to thank everyone who played a role in getting me there and also to thank the other patients for sharing their stories and their thoughts and ideas.

I have been in my new community, Waterville, Maine, for about 2 1/2 months now. Going to the KHI conference in Baltimore made me realize that I need to be involved in my new town. I found a group walk in the downtown area (Waterville Walks! hosted by Waterville Maine Street), I attended a public health meeting as a member of the community (Healthy Northern Kennebec), and I participated in a workshop down in Hallowell, Maine at the Harlow Gallery (Healing Through Art: Confronting Your Inner Critic). My goal is to find out as much as I can about the resources that are available in this area. I understand that input from members of the community really is important and that the people asking for the input want to hear what people have to say. I am not surprised that so few people attend these community events thinking that they will be boring or useless, but I am doing my part to let everyone I cross paths with know that there is a lot to do out there, that there are unlimited ways to get involved, and that if you keep looking and put in some effort the resources can be found. I am grateful that the KHI conference has opened so many doors for me.

L: I love the interaction with other patients, and the opportunity to both learn and encourage others. I think it was important for many patients to feel they both have a voice and that our collective voices were not only being heard, but welcomed.

Stay tuned for Part II of this blog when we chat about what kind of planning it took to make this event as patient-centric as possible with those who ran it. And don’t forget to visit the site to connect with Samantha-Anne, Laura, and the nearly 1,000 other PatientsLikeMe members living with chronic kidney disease.

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PatientsLikeMe Names 2015-2016 Team of Advisors, Sets Focus on Redefining Patient Partnerships

Posted October 19th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, October 19, 2015—PatientsLikeMe has named 14 members to its patient-only 20152016 Team of Advisors and challenged them to work through an issue that’s central to everyone in the healthcare system: how to redefine patient partnerships. The team will be focused on rethinking what it means for patients to be partners, and on establishing new ways for the healthcare industry to connect with patients to deliver better care.

PatientsLikeMe CEO Martin Coulter said that in an era when patients must be front and center in healthcare discovery and development, the group’s mission is vital to every patient, pharmaceutical company, regulator, payor and provider. “This advisory team includes some of the strongest patient advocates we have ever met. Their experience can empower other patients, and help those serving patients understand what it means to be a good partner. The team’s work will help create a stronger foundation for a more equal and participatory system of care.

More than 1,400 PatientsLikeMe members submitted applications for this year’s Team of Advisors. Those selected represent a range of medical and professional backgrounds and ages. The nearly equal mix of men and women are living with a cross-section of conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), bipolar II, cancer, Type 1 diabetes, fibromyalgia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lupus, major depressive disorder (MDD), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and post traumatic stress (PTS). Members named to the team include: Christel Aprigliano, Craig Braquet, Jeff Demers, Cyrena Gawuga, David Gewirtz, Phyllis Marchand, John Michael, Gus Prieto, Laura Roix, Patti Sanner, Allison Silensky, Angela Stogner, Doug Thornburg and Peggy Zuckerman.

Christel Aprigliano is living with Type 1 diabetes and believes that the key to a good partnership is a focused, data-driven discussion on what matters most to patients. “Patient reported outcomes are crucial to the healthcare conversation. The more information we can share about what life is like for patients every day, the more questions we can ask each other, and the better we can help patients live well with the disease they have.”

The 2015-2016 Team of Advisors recently kicked off their 12-month collaboration with PatientsLikeMe in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and will convene several times in the coming months. This is the second Team of Advisors the company has formed. Last year, the inaugural group provided feedback to the research team and published a best practices guide that outlines new standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage patients throughout the research process.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


ORE Researcher Series: McMaster University

Posted July 20th, 2015 by

Last month, you met ORE researcher Tamara Kear, PhD., R.N., CNS, CNN, and you listened to her talk about her research on hypertension, one of the factors that can lead to a person developing kidney disease. Today, we’re introducing McMaster University Professor Gordon Guyatt and students Melody Ren and Reza Mirzaie. The question they are asking is “how are patients currently receiving bad news from a medical professional, and are the guidelines doctors have on delivering bad news actually correct?” Below, listen to the three researchers talk about their work and how the ORE platform and PatientsLikeMe made their research possible.

What exactly is the ORE? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

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Results From PatientsLikeMe Survey Highlight Patient Beliefs About Medical Marijuana

Posted July 14th, 2015 by

Cambridge, MA, July 14, 2015—A new survey of 219 PatientsLikeMe members has found that patients with certain conditions who use medical marijuana believe it is the best available treatment for them, with fewer side effects than other options and few risks. The survey, conducted in June 2015, is among the first to gauge patient perceptions about the benefits and risks of medical marijuana and their level of willingness to recommend its use.

PatientsLikeMe’s Vice President for Advocacy, Policy, and Patient Safety, Sally Okun, RN said that while the number of respondents and conditions represented is limited, the survey and its results come at an important time. “As more people consider using medical marijuana, and more states legalize it, patients need to know what others are experiencing. This survey starts to gather real world data about marijuana as medicine—information that may be useful for patients and their physicians as they explore options and make treatment decisions.”

Half of the survey respondents started using medical marijuana in the last five years, while 25% started to do so in the last two years. Smoking (71%), edibles (55%), and vaporizing (49%) were the most commonly used methods for taking the treatment. The top three conditions represented were multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia and depression. Key findings are as follows:

Usage and Perceived Side Effects

  • About three quarters (74%) of survey respondents agree that medical marijuana is the best treatment available for their health issue. Another 20% are unsure if there is another option available.
  • 76% report that they use medical marijuana because other treatments weren’t working and/or caused too many side effects. About 21% use it to avoid the side effects of other treatments.
  • When asked about the severity of side effects from using marijuana, 86% of PatientsLikeMe members who report using marijuana indicate the side effects are either “none” or “mild.” The same group says those side effects include dry mouth, increased appetite, and sleepiness.

Perceived Benefits and Risks

  • Survey respondents use medical marijuana for more than one reason, including to treat pain (75%), muscle stiffness or spasms (69%), insomnia (67%) and anxiety (55%). The majority (63%) considered marijuana as a treatment option because they think it is more natural.
  • Most (93%) say that they would recommend medical marijuana to another patient.
  • About 61% say their healthcare provider is supportive of their medical marijuana use, and 60% have a letter of recommendation or prescription.
  • Most patients report a low level of concern (“Not at all” or “A little”) with long-term health risks, such as developing lung cancer (89%), long-term lung damage (86%), or becoming addicted/dependent (96%).
  • One in four patients (26%) report being “Somewhat” or “Very” concerned with legal problems.

Infographics on these and other survey results and the complete list of questions and responses are available at http://news.patientslikeme.com.

David Casarett, M.D., a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and the author of the newly-released book STONED: A Doctor’s Case For Medical Marijuana, worked with PatientsLikeMe on the survey. “This is an important first step in crowdsourced science about medical marijuana. Until we have a lot more large, high-quality clinical trials, patients will need to rely on each other to learn about whether and how medical marijuana might help them.”

Medical marijuana refers to the use of the cannabis plant as well as synthetic THC and cannabinoids as medicine. It is legal in Canada, Belgium, Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Spain, and in some U.S. states.

Survey Methodology
Between May 26 and June 10, 2015, PatientsLikeMe invited 1,288 members who added medical marijuana to their profile to respond to the survey; 219 completed it. The mean age of the respondents was 49 years (SD: 12.2); the age range was 19 – 84 years. Most respondents (81%) reported their location as the United States, while 13% are from Canada and the rest are from Australia, Europe, South Africa or Israel. Four respondents did not report their location.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 350,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
PatientsLikeMe
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com
781.492.1039


ORE Researcher Series: Tamara Kear is listening to kidney patients

Posted June 25th, 2015 by

Over the next few months, you’ll meet a few Open Research Exchange (ORE) researchers, and first up is Tamara Kear, PhD., R.N., CNS, CNN. She has over 20 years’ practice as a nurse caring for patients with kidney disease. Her research is focused on hypertension, one of the factors that can lead to a person developing kidney disease.

Tamara has developed a scale for healthcare providers that helps them learn how well a patient is doing at home and identify barriers they are experiencing in managing their hypertension. Her goal is to develop a better tool. In her video, she explains her ORE research and her philosophy that patients should be “not just informers for researchers, but actually the researchers themselves.”

What exactly is the ORE? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

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PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ 2015: Celebrating 7 years of PatientsLikeMe members giving back to their communities and raising awareness

Posted May 11th, 2015 by

For those of you who don’t know, our PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ program has been running since 2009—how time flies! Join us in celebrating our 7th year with a recap of 2014, our biggest year so far!

Last year, we had the honor of supporting 2192 members across 32 states that participated in a range of events and had a lot of fun along the way! Some of the events included a motorcycle ride, a golf tournament, a MuckFest, a Halloween Run and Relay, and a Cake Sale to boot!

If you’re unfamiliar with how it works, check out our guidelines – we sponsor 3-star members (super health data donors) who form teams and fundraise with their local nonprofits. And these advocates receive a donation, free team t-shirts and more! Here’s what some members had to say:

“Advocacy is huge, because without voices out there speaking on our behalf, we would never get any funding or support.”

“It is thanks to these fundraisers that there are now therapeutic options for patients like us. When I was first diagnosed, there was NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTHING. While there is still no cure, we have evidence that research is making strides and there is greater reason to hope. I have always been so grateful for the generosity of the PLM program. I feel so fortunate every time my family and I can contribute, to the financing of research for the cure.”

Quick facts:

More than 2,100 members from 113 different teams raised close to $24,000 through the PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ program in 2014.

Events took place in 32 states:

And represented 28 disease communities:

Thanks to everyone who participated in 2014! If you’d like to join the program in 2015, here’s all you need to do:

  1. Join PatientsLikeMe (it’s free!)
  2. Get 3 stars (your profile is up-to-date)
  3. Submit your team details (within 3-4 weeks notice of the event, please!)

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Making sure conferences are “Patients Included”

Posted May 1st, 2015 by

Picture this: you’re a medical professional and are about to open the doors to a conference you’ve spent years pulling together. You’ve booked your venue, have your sponsors lined up, got top headliners to give keynotes, picked your Twitter hashtag and have invited every industry pro to be a part of the event.

In walk the physicians; check. Allied health professionals; check. Pharmacists; check. Industry leaders, life science CEO’s and top researchers; check, check, check.

Notice anyone that’s missing? If medical conferences exist to create a network, to stimulate new collaborations, overturn redundant thinking, and to help attendees return to work reinvigorated, the conference that excludes patients misses hearing the most important voices in medicine.

But luckily for you, patients living with a variety of conditions aren’t just sitting on the sidelines anymore. They’re proactively participating in these conferences any way they can, even if that means going through the virtual window. They watch the hashtag, pose questions, say they wish the conference were live-streamed, and ask attendees to smuggle out knowledge they could use to improve their care or offer them hope. If they’re ignored or marginalized they take to the Twittersphere and let their displeasure be known.

“The slow boring of hard boards”
Over a decade ago the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) began inviting patients to its meetings, initially as observers, later as participants and then finally as true co-producers. It was a long journey, and as patient research partner Maarten de Wit has described, not always easy for its patient members. However the team has documented the benefits of patient inclusion such as: “widening the research agenda; including patient relevant outcomes in core sets; enhancing patient reported instruments; changing the culture of OMERACT… identifying previously neglected outcome domains such as fatigue, sleep disturbances and flares which prompted collaborative working on new programmes of research.”

A new mechanism for change
On May 1st 2015, a group of volunteers hope to take patient inclusivity to the next level by releasing version 1.0 of a crowdsourced charter called #PatientsIncluded. It contains five clauses based on Lucien Englen’s astute observation that there are too many conferences lacking patients on the planning committee, on stage, and in the audience. Medical conferences that are certain they meet the criteria have the right to use the “Patients Included” logo, and we hope will rapidly come to realize the benefits that can accrue.

The charter is by no means a silver bullet – it is a tool to encourage conference organizers to think past tokenism, be ambitious in their striving to integrate, and to reward those who take the uncomfortable step to try something different. My hope is that a wellspring of advice, best practices, and strategies will emerge from conference organizers as they deal with issues of cost, inclusivity, managing tensions, and reflecting on the changes made. Patients will develop their own resources to help one another plan, influence, participate, and engage in what might well be an uncomfortable and unfamiliar environment themselves.

As a member of the 5-strong patient panel at this month’s International Forum on Safety and Quality, hosted by the BMJ, there was much to admire from the way patients were celebrated and invited to speak and chair sessions. It was also clear that the scientific advisory board is taking seriously the notion that patients are  experts in their own right with much to offer. However it’s clear too that advocating and just being physically present at a medical conference is hard and exhausting work.

I hope actors on both sides of the qualification fence will work to support one another and acknowledge that this is a journey. Mistakes will be made. Iterations will have to occur. The name itself, version 1.0, demands that we constantly realign  and have the confidence to continue forward. The reward for the future will be that of professionals and patient-experts joining forces to advance our collective understanding of illness, formulate new plans of attack, and forge new weapons in the fight against disease.

PatientsLikeMe member PaulWicks

 

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Throwback Thursday: Paul discusses what happens when trial participants realize they hold the power

Posted April 30th, 2015 by

Just about a year ago, PatientsLikeMe’s Paul Wicks, PhD, Vice President of Innovation, wrote a blog post about what happens when trial participants realize they hold the power in clinical trials. He began his early experiences with ALS patients and clinical trials, but then fast-forwarded to how PatientsLikeMe members have replicated a clinical trial, started sharing their data with leading researchers to debunk alternative “cures” for their disease and even started taking trials into their own hands. Read what else Paul had to say here.

And if you’re interested in learning more, click below to watch Paul talk about patients leading the direction of clinical research in an interview with BioMed Central:

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PatientsLikeMe and AstraZeneca announce global research collaboration

Posted April 13th, 2015 by

          

Five-year agreement focused on improving health outcomes for patients across main therapy areas

CAMBRIDGE, MA, April 13, 2015—In a major step forward to make patient-centric evidence a cornerstone of scientific discovery and development, PatientsLikeMe and AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN) have signed a five-year agreement to provide access to PatientsLikeMe’s global network in support of AstraZeneca’s patient-driven research initiatives.

AstraZeneca will use patient-reported data from PatientsLikeMe to shape future medicine development and help improve outcomes across its main therapeutic areas, with an initial focus on respiratory disease, lupus, diabetes and oncology.

“Understanding what patients are experiencing every day and how they define the value of their treatments are fundamental to our ability to push the boundaries of science in developing the next-generation of medicines,” said Briggs Morrison, EVP Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca. “Our partnership with PatientsLikeMe will help us to harness the important perspectives of patients through their advanced technology and real-world, real-time evidence to support our research and development programs.”

The agreement is the latest to embrace PatientsLikeMe’s global network, which delivers a unique depth and breadth of data about the patient. Ed Godber, Executive Vice President of Life Sciences Ventures, said the wide-ranging collaboration with AstraZeneca also marks a significant step in realizing PatientsLikeMe’s mission to make patients true partners in science.

“It’s rare to find a partner so committed to listening to and integrating the patient voice into the heart of its scientific development and operations. We’re excited to work together to transform the discovery and healthcare model and develop products and services tailored to what patients experience and truly need,” Godber said.

About PatientsLikeMe
PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 325,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 60 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook.

About AstraZeneca
AstraZeneca is a global, innovation-driven biopharmaceutical business that focuses on the discovery, development and commercialisation of prescription medicines, primarily for the treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory, inflammation, autoimmune, oncology, infection and neuroscience diseases. AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. For more information please visit: astrazeneca.com.

Contact
Margot Carlson Delogne
(781) 492-1039
mcdelogne@patientslikeme.com