2 posts tagged “heat intolerance”

Parkinson’s disease and hyperhidrosis: Sweat struggles + solutions

Posted July 11th, 2018 by

PatientsLikeMe members with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have talked a lot about excessive sweating (aka hyperhidrosis) and heat intolerance with Parkinson’s disease. It can be a “stinker,” as one blogger who has PD recently shared in Parkinson’s News Today.

Can you relate? Read on for more information and some possible adjustments or life hacks that others have tried.

One study found that over 60% of patients with PD experience sweating disturbances like hyperhidrosis (over-secretion of sweat) or hypohydrosis (under-secretion of sweat, which is less common).

The Parkinson’s Foundation and Parkinson’s Victoria cover these issues in their guides to skin, scalp and sweat changes related to PD. In addition to hyperhidrosis, many people with PD experience an extra-oily scalp (or other parts of the body), drenching night sweats and general difficulty with temperature control.

Some of these problems may stem from PD itself, which affects some of the body’s automatic functions, such as blood pressure and temperature regulation.

Research has shown that hyperhidrosis also seems to occur along with “off” times in levodopa treatment and with dyskinesia (jerky movements without tremors).

Possible solutions and hacks

Maria De Leon, M.D., a neurologist with young onset PD, writes on her blog that she understands firsthand the impact that sweating (and related body odor) issues can have on people’s lives. A few things you can try? Dr. De Leon suggests:

  • Talking with your doctor about possible levodopa treatment adjustments and even other treatments that may help, such as propranolol (see what PatientsLikeMe members with PD report about propranolol)
  • Taking lukewarm showers or baths
  • Wearing lightweight cotton clothes
  • Drinking extra fluids, especially water
  • Using antibacterial soap to help prevent body odor, and thorough towel drying before getting dressed
  • Trying clinical or “industrial” strength antiperspirant/deodorants. Dr. De Leon says these “work best if you apply at night before bed time not after showering or will wash off; it takes 6 to 8 hours for antiperspirants to enter sweat ducts and properly clog pores plus the body is cooler at night. But do reapply at least once during the day.”

Elsewhere online, people with hyperhidrosis recommend wearing solid dark colors or clothes with prints to help camouflage sweat marks, using underarm sweat pads, wearing leather shoes to help stave off odor, and bringing a small towel and a spare shirt just in case. A New York Magazine writer with hyperhidrosis (but not PD) rounded up his favorite products for over-perspiration.

Talk with your doctor about any skin- or sweat-related issues you’re experiencing. Dr. De Leon says that anxiety, thyroid problems or other health conditions can also cause or add to excessive sweating.

Join PatientsLikeMe to see what the community says about excessive sweating and heat intolerance with PD, or add a comment below based on your own experiences.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


What Do You Know About Thyroid Disease?

Posted January 11th, 2012 by

Let’s start with the basics:  do you even know where your thyroid is?

A small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck (just below the Adam’s apple), the thyroid influences the function of the heart, brain, liver, kidneys and skin.  That’s why it’s so important to know if you have a thyroid problem – especially if you’re a woman.  Women are five times more likely than men to suffer from hypothyroidism, which occurs when the gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone for the body to function properly.  Hypothyroidism can cause weight gain, miscarriages, forgetfulness, irregular menstrual periods and numerous other symptoms.

"I Am the Face of Thyroid Disease" Is the Theme of a Campaign Launched to Support Thyroid Awareness Month (Click Through to See Patient Videos and Stories)

January is Thyroid Awareness Month, which means it’s a good time to “check your neck.”  As many as 30 million Americans may have thyroid problems, but more than half of them remain undiagnosed.  To help combat this lack of awareness, two thyroid disease patient advocates – Mary Shomon and Katie Schwartz – have created a new campaign called “I Am the Face of Thyroid Disease.”  It features video messages and photos from around the world to “shine a spotlight on the diversity of thyroid patients and their practitioners, and help overcome the stigma and silence surrounding thyroid disease.”

This diversity can also be seen in PatientsLikeMe’s hypothyroidism community, where more than 2,200 patients (8% of whom are male) report the disease.  Some of the most commonly reported symptoms in our community include cold intolerance, dry skin and lethargy, while one of the top reported treatments is Levothyroxine (branded as Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid and more), a synthetic form of the human hormone thyroxine.  190 patients with hypothyroidism have shared in-depth treatment evaluations of Levothyroxine, detailing their experiences with effectiveness, side effects, cost and more.  These evaluations also contain a wealth of tips and advice.

Some of the Commonly Reported Treatments for Hypothyroidism at PatientsLikeMe

Here’s what one long-time Levothyroxine user writes on her evaluation:

“I have taken this for 31 years now. If you do need to take this, please pay attention how you feel. If you have symptoms such as dry skin and feeling tired all the time, it might be that you’re not getting enough of it. You might need to up the dosage.  If you have heart racing and you’re losing lots of weight, etc., it might be you’re getting too much. Don’t forget to get a yearly blood test to make sure your dosage level is correct.”

We also have a little over 100 patients (12% of whom are male) reporting hyperthyroidism, a less common form of thyroid disease that occurs when the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone.   Some of the most commonly reported symptoms include heat intolerance, excessive sweating and palpitations.  Along with those who have other forms of thyroid disease – including Hashimoto Thyroiditis – more than 8,000 members belong to the Endocrine, Metabolism and Nutrition Forum, where they can discuss their thyroid experiences with others like them.

Think you might have a thyroid problem?  Perform your own “neck check” at home (to detect any bulges or enlargement in your thyroid gland) and/or see your doctor for a thyroid evaluation today.  A simple blood test called the TSH test can tell you whether your thyroid gland is functioning normally.  If you’ve already been diagnosed, gain wisdom from connecting with thousands of others like you at PatientsLikeMe.