3 posts tagged “engineering”

A day in the life of User Experience Designer Flavia Gnecco

Posted October 21st, 2015 by

By now, you’re probably familiar with our “Day in the life” series. But in case you haven’t had a chance to check it out, here’s a quick overview: members of the PatientsLikeMe community share a lot about their health journey and experiences on the site. In turn, we like to share stories from the PatientsLikeMe team every now and then to help everyone get to know us, what we do and why we’re happy to be a part of PatientsLikeMe.

Today, we’d like to introduce you to Flavia Gnecco, a User Experience Designer on our UX and design team. Flavia, a world traveler, joined us last October (happy 1 year anniversary, Flavia!). Read her interview below, and don’t forget to take a look at the other posts in the “Day in the life” series if you haven’t already.

1. How did you first hear about PatientsLikeMe? What brought you to the organization?

I first heard about PatientsLikeMe while I was working at NIBR (Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research) back in 2012. The name came up while brainstorming around how researchers could find out about actual patient experiences. Fast forward a two years later and I came across a job posting for user experience designer at PatientsLikeMe. The name had stuck in my mind. When I learned how PatientsLikeMe was founded, I was sold – it is so authentic and the mission is one that I knew I could stand behind. I got into design specifically so I could work on projects that were having a positive impact on the daily lives of others. I studied Industrial Design in grad school and never thought I’d end up working for a website but when I realized that the process was the same and the outcome was exactly what I was hoping to achieve, it made a lot of sense.

2. Tell us a little about your role as a user experience designer. What kind of projects are you working on right now?

Right now I’m working on a few things. My biggest project so far has been to figure out the first steps towards improving how members can record their experiences, with different conditions. It’ll make things more engaging and the result will be more meaningful to our users. For now that means I’m doing a lot of sketching for how different interactions might work on the site (i.e. if you click a button, what should happen next?).

I collaborate a lot with the engineers who make sure things actually work on the site, and the UX team also works very closely with the health data integrity (HDI) team to design questions and make sure they are accurate but also sound like a human wrote it. Admittedly, it’s a work in progress! While I was in design school I specifically remember saying, “You can apply the design process to anything – you can even design how you ask a question!” Who knew I was predicting my own future? 😉

I’m also working on an ethnography project and get to talk directly to people who are figuring out how to live with a chronic condition. This is really inspiring and I know will influence how I think about the rest of my work – and my life!

3. What’s your favorite part about working at PatientsLikeMe?

Just one?! The people – definitely. There is always an interesting conversation happening and I’m constantly learning something new. I’ve been here a year now but I have yet to be bored. I take that as a good thing. I also really like the fact that PatientsLikeMe is an organization that’s trying to do right in the world. I’ve learned from experience that it’s very important to me. Oh – and bonus – I get to be mentored directly by Kim Goodwin and Robert Reinman.

4. You’ve traveled all over the world and are fluent in 4 languages. What’s your favorite destination outside of the U.S. and why?

Tough question! I’m lucky that I have multiple places that I can call home that are also incredible destinations (Florence, Italy; Lima, Peru; and in the US, Boston; New York; San Francisco) I get to go to those places almost every year.  My two-year-old son has already been to all those locations except NYC…but that’s already in the works.  I don’t know what I’d do if I couldn’t travel!  But honestly, my favorite destinations are all those places I still haven’t been to. I’m definitely a fan of the journey and discovering new places but I’m a quiet adventurer – more on the foods, museums, dramatic landscapes and hikes. High on my list of things to do soon is to buy a round-the-world ticket.

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A day in the life of Software Engineer Jacinda Zhong

Posted March 6th, 2015 by

In the last “A day in the life” post, Jonathan shared his story about his son Nolan’s hand injury. In case you aren’t familiar with the series, here’s the scoop. At PatientsLikeMe, we believe in the power of openness, and members frequently share about their health journeys and experiences with different conditions. And since they go above and beyond, the staff at PatientsLikeMe likes to share their own stories to help everyone get to know us, too.

In this edition, Jacinda, a software engineer on the PatientsLikeMe team, introduced herself and spoke about her role, her thoughts on health tech and her passions outside of work. Read her interview below, and don’t forget to check out other posts in the “A day in the life” series.

When did you first hear about PatientsLikeMe? What drew you to join the organization?

I heard about PatientsLikeMe through the Vice President of Engineering, Marcia Nizzari. She is a board member at the arts nonprofit Cantata Singers, which is where I used to work. After I heard about PatientsLikeMe and did some research, I was really drawn to the idea of an application that helps people, instead of technology for technology’s sake. I was also very moved by the founders’ story, and believe that if the leadership has a strong personal connection to the mission, the company becomes more mission-driven, versus financially-driven, which is unfortunately the case with so many technology companies.

Tell us a little about your role as a software engineer. What are some things you’re working on?

I have been working on many different parts of the website, such as quick start and the condition reports. I’ve really enjoyed being able to work in all levels of the stack – from database queries to JavaScript on the client side. I think that is something really great about the PatientsLikeMe engineering team, where the majority of the engineers work on the front and back end. This allows engineers to develop a wide skill set and to contribute to all parts of the site.

You’re one of PatientsLikeMe’s newest employees – in your first few months, what has really stood out to you about PatientsLikeMe?

Similar to what I said above, I really like that PatientsLikeMe is so mission-driven, and wants to change medicine. We are empowering the masses to communicate to each other, and come to conclusions that would not otherwise be reached in the traditional healthcare system. Technology has enabled us to create a platform to facilitate discussion and data-sharing that provides value where the market/patients do not realize they wanted it. It’s almost like we are Apple in some ways, where we are providing a service that the market didn’t know it needed, and only after we show the market what we have to offer, does it realize that it is desired.

We hear you speak French – c’est génial! What else do you do for fun outside of the office?

I am mostly coding in the evenings, but I also salsa dance, and do spin in the winter, and run in the summer. I did competitive ballroom dancing in college, which opened up my world to partner dancing. I started learning salsa in senior year of college, and continued after graduation. Next up is learning some more swing/lindy hop and west coast swing (though as you might have guessed, California is better for west coast swing than in New England).

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2011 “Wow Week” Highlights

Posted January 27th, 2012 by

Last June, we shared how our award-winning Clinical Trials tool was a product of “Wow Week,” which takes place every sixth week here at PatientsLikeMe.  It’s essentially our version of Google’s “20-percent time,” or a period of unstructured time where our engineers have the freedom to work on their own ideas.  We believe it fosters passion, experimentation and risk-taking.  In fact, we know it has given how many other site improvements were conceived during “Wow Week” in 2011.

The list is quite long (kudos, engineering team!), so we singled out three “Wow Week” projects that seemed to really resonate with our 128,000+ members.

MyCycle

Engineering Team Credits: Amy Newell, Doug Martila, Ben Zack and Scott Listfield

For women, your menstrual cycle can be intricately tied to your health condition(s), as well as how you feel. Now, with MyCycle, you can monitor your cycle length, view it next to your other health information and predict the next start date.  (If you’re a female who has not indicated your gender on your basic information, you’ll need to do so in order to receive access to this feature.)

A Look at the MyCycle Feature at PatientsLikeMe

Fuzzy Dates

Engineering Team Credits: Jeffrey Chupp (no longer with the company) and Michael Berkowitz

Are you often fuzzy about your dates?  So are most people.  In recognition of the fact that photographic memory is a rare trait, you can now specify dates with varying levels of accuracy or “fuzziness” – the year (2008), the year and month (May 2008) or the full date (May 22, 2008).  Whatever you can remember is better than no data at all!

Entering Dates at PatientsLikeMe Got a Lot Easier in 2011

Mobile InstantMe

Engineering Team Credits: Steve Hammond, Thomas Mayfield, Joe Rodriguez, Keenan Brock, James Kebinger and Doug Martila

For InstantMe (our daily log of how you’re feeling) to be more instant, we needed an app, right?  This mobile website/application uses HTML5 to support the tracking of your InstantMe scores on your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone.  Learn more about what it can do here.  (Note that this feature is now open to all members, regardless of their star level.)

Feeling Good in the Grocery Store?  Take the InstantMe Survey on your iPhone!

Are we right?  Did these new tools and features add more “Wow” to your PatientsLikeMe experience?  We’ve love to hear your thoughts in the comments section.  And as always, stay tuned to our Release Notes page for the latest technology updates and innovations.

PatientsLikeMe member wpeterson