17 posts tagged “day”

“Focus on making small but meaningful changes” – an interview with Amy Campbell

Posted March 25th, 2015 by

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Good Measures, a company that combines the expertise of dietitians with state-of-the-art technology to help people improve their eating and exercise habits. Before joining Good Measures, Amy worked for almost 20 years at Joslin Diabetes Center, an internationally recognized diabetes treatment, research and education institution.

Amy, you have an impressive background – former nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet, just for starters. As a certified diabetes educator, you’re aware of the media buzz around the new cholesterol guidelines. What does this mean for people with type 2 diabetes – and those at risk for it?

Cholesterol guidelines have always been somewhat confusing. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert panel that provides recommendations to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, has done their homework and really examined the evidence around dietary cholesterol. The good news is that, for the first time, the committee is really downplaying the role of dietary cholesterol. In other words, for most of the population, eating foods that contain cholesterol has little if any effect on blood cholesterol levels. This is great news!

Whether or not eating eggs affects our cholesterol levels is awfully fuzzy for many people. As both a dietitian and a health professional advisor for the Egg Nutrition Center, this probably comes up a lot. What’s the latest wisdom?

For many years, health professionals, including doctors and dietitians, advised their patients to limit or even avoid eggs due to their cholesterol content. But a number of important studies have shown that dietary cholesterol (cholesterol found in food) has little effect on blood cholesterol levels. In fact, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee have dropped their recommendation that Americans limit their intake of cholesterol from foods, such as eggs and shrimp.

The data is a little less clear in terms of how dietary cholesterol might affect people who have type 2. But again, there’s no need to cut eggs out of a diabetes eating plan. In fact, if anything, eggs are a great addition because they are carbohydrate-free, rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Eggs provide many other important nutrients, as well, such as iron and vitamin D. Plus, they’re budget-friendly nutrients, as well.

Any specific suggestions for foods to eat or avoid if you want to reduce the level of “bad” (or lousy or LDL) cholesterol?

Although there’s some controversy surrounding saturated fat and how “evil” it really is, studies do show that this type of fat, found in red meat, cheese, whole milk and butter, for example, can raise LDL cholesterol levels. However, there are foods that can lower LDL cholesterol. These include foods high in soluble fiber, such as oatmeal, oat bran, beans, apples and pears. And foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts and flax seed can lower LDL levels as well.

Type 2 diabetes seems to be one of those conditions that’s closely related to lifestyle. Along with tips on nutrition, what else do your readers want in helping to manage their diabetes?

I’ve found that people who have type 2 diabetes want simple but straightforward suggestions on what they can do to live a healthy life with diabetes. Making changes to one’s eating plan can be difficult (we form our eating habits early on!), so practical pointers around food shopping, making nutritious meals and controlling portions are always helpful.

In addition, because getting and staying physically active is so important for people with diabetes, guidelines on how to fit activity into one’s daily life (like walking on your lunch break, for example, or using a resistance band while watching TV) are invaluable. Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can be stressful. Finding ways to reduce stress and to take time to relax is important. Finally, information is power. I encourage people who have diabetes to check their blood sugar levels – if not every day, at least a few times per week – to get a better understanding of how their food, activity and medications affect their diabetes control.

What about sleep? Have patients indicated that the condition seems to be associated with insomnia or sleep apnea?

Sleep is a big issue when it comes to diabetes. First, poorly controlled diabetes can keep a person from getting a good night’s sleep, especially if they’re getting up frequently to use the bathroom or get something to drink. Second, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk for sleep apnea, a serious condition whereby a person stops breathing for short periods of time while sleeping. And third, complications from diabetes, such as neuropathy, can also prevent a person from getting restful sleep.

Restless leg syndrome is another condition that interferes with sleep, and this condition is more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. A lack of sleep can increase the risk of heart disease, obesity and even type 2 diabetes. Sleep deprivation can also do a number on your immune system, meaning that you’re more likely to get sick. Sleep experts recommend aiming for about 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night.

So, if you could come up with three top bits of advice for people who live with – or want to avoid – type 2 diabetes, what would they be?

Here’s my advice: First, focus on making small but meaningful changes to your eating plan (if you need to!). You don’t need to cut out carbs or go on some stringent diet. But aim to eat plenty of “whole” foods, including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and lean protein foods. Limit processed and fast food as much as possible.

Second, be active. If going to the gym isn’t for you, no worries. Go walking. Climb stairs. March in place when you watch television or talk on the phone. Physical activity is so important to help with blood sugar control. And third, take care of yourself. This means getting enough (but not too much) sleep, managing stress and making sure you have support from family, friends, co-workers or even an online community.

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Are you at risk for diabetes? Take the test

Posted March 24th, 2015 by

Listen up: if you’re living in the United States, there’s about a 1 in 3 chance you’ll develop diabetes over the course of your lifetime. But there are many ways you can lower your risk, which is why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recognized March 24 as Diabetes ALERT! Day. Today is about raising awareness for not only those living with diabetes, but those who can still make lifestyle changes to avoid developing it.

Diabetes is one of the most common health conditions in the United States – in 2012, over 29 million Americans (almost 10 percent of the U.S. population) had some form of diabetes (learn about types of diabetes here).1 It’s also estimated that in 2010, 86 million citizens aged 20 or older had prediabetes, which if left untreated, is likely to develop into type 2 diabetes in less than 10 years. Check out the infographic below for a quick snapshot of diabetes in the U.S., courtesy of the ADA and CDC.

Today, take the ADA’s type 2 diabetes risk test and share it with your friends, family and colleagues. It only takes a few minutes to answer the multiple-choice questions – you never know what you or someone else might discover from the results. And don’t forget to highlight your participation on social media through the #DiabetesAlert hashtag.

Many PatientsLikeMe members are living with diabetes – in fact, over 16,000 with type 2 and over 2,000 with type 1. If you’ve been diagnosed, join and share your experiences with the community.

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1 http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/


A day in the life of Software Engineer Jacinda Zhong

Posted March 6th, 2015 by

In the last “A day in the life” post, Jonathan shared his story about his son Nolan’s hand injury. In case you aren’t familiar with the series, here’s the scoop. At PatientsLikeMe, we believe in the power of openness, and members frequently share about their health journeys and experiences with different conditions. And since they go above and beyond, the staff at PatientsLikeMe likes to share their own stories to help everyone get to know us, too.

In this edition, Jacinda, a software engineer on the PatientsLikeMe team, introduced herself and spoke about her role, her thoughts on health tech and her passions outside of work. Read her interview below, and don’t forget to check out other posts in the “A day in the life” series.

When did you first hear about PatientsLikeMe? What drew you to join the organization?

I heard about PatientsLikeMe through the Vice President of Engineering, Marcia Nizzari. She is a board member at the arts nonprofit Cantata Singers, which is where I used to work. After I heard about PatientsLikeMe and did some research, I was really drawn to the idea of an application that helps people, instead of technology for technology’s sake. I was also very moved by the founders’ story, and believe that if the leadership has a strong personal connection to the mission, the company becomes more mission-driven, versus financially-driven, which is unfortunately the case with so many technology companies.

Tell us a little about your role as a software engineer. What are some things you’re working on?

I have been working on many different parts of the website, such as quick start and the condition reports. I’ve really enjoyed being able to work in all levels of the stack – from database queries to JavaScript on the client side. I think that is something really great about the PatientsLikeMe engineering team, where the majority of the engineers work on the front and back end. This allows engineers to develop a wide skill set and to contribute to all parts of the site.

You’re one of PatientsLikeMe’s newest employees – in your first few months, what has really stood out to you about PatientsLikeMe?

Similar to what I said above, I really like that PatientsLikeMe is so mission-driven, and wants to change medicine. We are empowering the masses to communicate to each other, and come to conclusions that would not otherwise be reached in the traditional healthcare system. Technology has enabled us to create a platform to facilitate discussion and data-sharing that provides value where the market/patients do not realize they wanted it. It’s almost like we are Apple in some ways, where we are providing a service that the market didn’t know it needed, and only after we show the market what we have to offer, does it realize that it is desired.

We hear you speak French – c’est génial! What else do you do for fun outside of the office?

I am mostly coding in the evenings, but I also salsa dance, and do spin in the winter, and run in the summer. I did competitive ballroom dancing in college, which opened up my world to partner dancing. I started learning salsa in senior year of college, and continued after graduation. Next up is learning some more swing/lindy hop and west coast swing (though as you might have guessed, California is better for west coast swing than in New England).

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Recognizing National Donor Day

Posted February 14th, 2015 by

It’s Valentine’s Day, and besides flowers and candy, there’s a special way you can show somebody love today – by registering as an organ donor to give the most precious Valentine of all: the promise of life.

February 14th is also National Donor Day, and it’s all about recognizing those who have donated in the past and celebrating the lives of people who have thrived after receiving a transplant. To help, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has organized an awareness campaign including educational videos, stories of survivors and ways to participate today. If you haven’t already, search your state for an organ and tissue registry and learn how to become a donor. And don’t forget to share on social media using the #NationalDonorDay hashtag.

If you’ve received an organ donation – or are waiting for one – you can reach out to the transplant community at PatientsLikeMe and connect with members who have received heartkidneyliverlung or pancreas transplants, among many other types. You can also check out the extensive PatientVoice report on what life is like after a transplant and read about how PatientsLikeMe member Lori survived her lung condition through a lung transplant.

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“Not beyond us” – Recognizing World Cancer Day

Posted February 4th, 2015 by

The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) has organized today, February 4th, as World Cancer Day. This year’s theme: “Not beyond us.” It’s about highlighting that solutions to cancer are within our reach. Awareness is not beyond us. Prevention is not beyond us. And a cure is not beyond us. The UICC is encouraging everyone to take a positive and proactive approach in the fight against cancer by working towards these four goals:

  • Choosing healthy lives
  • Delivering early detection
  • Achieving treatment for all
  • Maximizing quality of life

You can become part of the World Cancer Day effort and raise awareness about what needs to be done. Whether it’s at an individual, community, governmental or global level, you can help in the fight. Visit the World Cancer Day website to learn how to get involved.

What are PatientsLikeMe members sharing about their journeys with cancer?

PatientsLikeMe member Glow4life was diagnosed with lung cancer (adenocarcinoma) this past June, and her story is a testament to never losing hope. She recently shared her experiences in an interview, and she spared no details in describing her challenges. Despite her terminal diagnosis, four rounds of chemotherapy and the sudden loss of her husband, Glow4life has remained positive, and she’s learned to take every day as it comes and live in the moment. Learn about her journey and how she shares love and hope whenever she can.

“Hope won’t make it happen” is Phil’s (PhillyH) personal motto in life. She’s a PatientsLikeMe member who hails from Northampton in the United Kingdom and was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2012. Ever since then, she’s been learning to live with the ups and downs of her condition. She recently shared her experiences in an interview with us, everything from the reaction she had after her blunt diagnosis to her treatment decisions and son’s new tattoo. Phil also shared her thoughts on what every person who has just been diagnosed with lung cancer should know. As she says, “If you don’t know, you can’t do” – read about her lung cancer journey.

Meet Vickie, a PatientsLikeMe member who has survived cancer not once, but twice. She’s sharing her story, from diagnosis to survivorship, during Lung Cancer Awareness Month. She spoke about her reaction to getting diagnosed, the anxiety filled months leading up to surgery and what recovery was like post-operation. Learn about her journey.

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Raising awareness on Veteran’s Day

Posted November 11th, 2014 by

Right now, there are almost 22 million American veterans living in the United States, and every one of them has a story to tell. So today, we’re honoring their service by raising awareness for life after the military.

Like many others who are living with chronic conditions, the injuries our military men and women sustain are not always visible. Thousands of veterans are affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 30,000 have been diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) since 2000 and many others are living with depression. Sometimes their symptoms don’t even manifest until many years after their service.

These eye-opening statistics are why we’ve recently announced a new multi-year collaboration with One Mind to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress traumatic brain injury, or both. We’ll work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research.

If you’re looking to learn more about US veterans, head to your nearest book store and grab a copy of “For Love of Country,” Howard Schultz’s and Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s new book (just released on November 4). Check out the video synopsis below:

 

There’s also the Concert for Valor today – it’s a free live event that is being organized on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for veteran’s awareness. If you can’t make it in person, tune in on iHeartRADIO.

If you’re a veteran living with PTS or TBI, you can find others and connect to people who understand what you’re going through on PatientsLikeMe. There are more than 4,000 of members in the Veterans Forum, and every day, veterans are learning more about their health and the best ways to cope. Share a bond, and live better, together.

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A decade of psoriasis awareness

Posted October 28th, 2014 by

Today marks the ten-year anniversary of World Psoriasis Day, a day with four goals: raise awareness for the condition, improve access to treatment, increase understanding of known information and build unity among the global psoriasis community.

And after ten years of raising awareness, it’s time to step it up a notch. Tomorrow, the International Federation of Psoriasis Associations (IFPA) is going to create a tidal wave of awareness on social media with their “Thunderclap” campaign. Join in here or click the sidebar on the right. When you join the movement, a World Psoriasis Day message will automatically be posted on your Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr account at 12:00pm Central European Time (7:00am on the east coast). You can share your own message with the #psoriasis and #WPD14 hashtags as well.

Check out some of our past posts on psoriasis, including the results of our “Uncovering Psoriasis” surveys, patient interviews (with Maria, David and Erica) and what doctors Jerry Bagel and Steve Feldman had to say about psoriasis. And if you’re living with psoriasis, don’t forget to connect with the community at PatientsLikeMe – more than 4,800 people are sharing their experiences and stories with each other.

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Let the world know about pulmonary fibrosis

Posted September 7th, 2014 by

On Rare Disease Day back in February 2013, we announced our partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim to help enhance the online idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) community. And by September 7th that same year, the community had grown to just over 1,000 people. Today, on the next edition of Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, the community stands 2,500+ members strong, making it the largest online gathering of IPF patients anywhere in the world. In just a year, the community has almost tripled in size, and everyone is sharing about their experiences so that other patients, doctors and researchers can learn more about life with IPF.

But what exactly is IPF? Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a medical condition that causes lung tissue to thicken, stiffen and scar over a period of time, and “idiopathic” means “no known cause.” According to the Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis, there are over 100,000 Americans living with IPF at any given time, and an estimated 40,000 will die from the condition every year. And besides a complete lung transplant, there is no known cure for IPF.1

Today, the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) is encouraging everyone to educate, share, fundraise and start conversations about IPF. You can learn more about how to get involved through the PFF’s toolkit and guidelines for September.  And if you or someone you know has been diagnosed with IPF, join the community at PatientsLikeMe – let’s change who knows about this condition and promote a better understanding of IPF all year round.

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1 http://www.coalitionforpf.org/facts-about-idiopathic-pulmonary-fibrosis/


Taking action for lupus awareness in May

Posted May 16th, 2014 by


If you think you look good in purple, you’re in luck – today is Put on Purple Day, sponsored by the Lupus Foundation of America. As part of the greater Lupus Awareness (Action!) Month in May, today is your chance to make lupus visible and learn about the effects of this chronic inflammatory condition.

Lupus is classified as an immunological disorder by the National Institute of Health, which means that it can affect anything from your joints, skin and kidneys to your heart, lungs and brain.1 Systemic lupus erythematosus is the most common type of lupus, but there are a few other kinds that are much more rare. The cause of lupus is unknown, and anyone can be diagnosed, although it mostly affects women. Some common symptoms of lupus include:

  • Pain or swelling in joints and muscle pain
  • Fever with no known cause
  • Red rashes, most often on the face
  • Chest pain when taking a deep breath
  • Hair loss
  • Pale or purple fingers or toes
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Swelling in legs or around eyes
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Swollen glands

Since these symptoms are frequently caused by many other health conditions, you can see why getting diagnosed with lupus can be a difficult process. Many people who are living with lupus don’t even know it yet! 2 3

To help raise awareness for lupus, snap a photo of yourself in purple and submit it to the Lupus Foundation’s Tumblr page. And if you’d like some more ideas for awareness in May, visit the official Lupus Awareness Month page for info on donations, toolkits, quick facts and more.

The PatientsLikeMe team all decked out for Put on Purple Day!

The PatientsLikeMe lupus community is growing, so if you’ve been diagnosed, reach out to the more than 4,000 members who know all about living with the condition. They’re donating health data on treatments and symptoms, and don’t hesitate to ask a question in the forum, either – the community is always up for sharing what they know.

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for Lupus Awareness Month.


1 http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Lupus/lupus_ff.asp

2 http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Lupus/lupus_ff.asp

3 https://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/lupus.html


Turning blue for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Awareness

Posted May 12th, 2014 by

Did you know that today is International Awareness Day for Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases (CINDs)? CINDs include fibromyalgia, Gulf War Syndrome, Multiple Chemical Sensitivities, Lyme disease and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (also know as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or ME/CFS).

ME/CFS is tough to diagnose because there are no tests for it, and other conditions can cause very similar symptoms. Plus, no one knows exactly what causes ME/CFS, and although it is most common in women in their 40s and 50s, it can occur in both genders at any age.1

So why blue? May12.org is encouraging all advocates to turn a part of their body blue for ME/CFS awareness – you can dye your hair (or wear a wig), paint your nails and even Photoshop yourself. Or, just wear a blue t-shirt 🙂 Check out their Facebook page and their website for more information on ME/CFS awareness, and don’t forget to submit your blue photos!

If you’re looking for more resources on ME/CFS, PatientsLikeMe member Jen has been working on a film called “Canary in a Coal Mine,” that we shared about on the blog back in October. The film is currently in production after a successful Kickstarter campaign, but you can still check out the official website and the video below to learn how you can help change the face of ME/CFS.

 

On PatientsLikeMe, more than 10,000 people are living with ME/CFS, and they’re sharing their health data by tracking symptoms and evaluating treatments. If you’ve been experiencing ME/CFS, connect with others like you in the fibromyalgia and ME/CFS forum and speak with the people who know what you’re going through firsthand.

 Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for ME/CFS Awareness Day.


1 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/chronicfatiguesyndrome.html


A day in the life of Software Engineer Jonathan Slate

Posted April 25th, 2014 by

Our members share a lot about their unique health journeys and experiences here on the blog. Just recently, Kim spoke about her shock with MS, Betty talked about her frustration finding the right diagnosis, and Lori’s been sharing about life on the lung transplant list. And as part of our ongoing “A day in the life” series, PatientsLikeMe Software Engineer Jonathan Slate shared about his own recent journey after his son Nolan’s hand injury. He walked through the whole experience, from Nolan’s initial accident to how a simple CD with some x-rays on it sparked an ‘ah ha!’ moment for him.

 

You started working at PatientsLikeMe about 6 months ago – tell us a little bit about what you do.

I work as a Software Engineer, developing new site features, fixing issues and working with other engineers to come up with creative solutions to the technical challenges of building and maintaining the PatientsLikeMe site. I’ve also done some work on the PatientsLikeMe Open Research Exchange project.

You’ve said you experienced two “eureka” moments at PatientsLikeMe – what happened, exactly?

Well, the first was on the PatientsLikeMe forums, where I found out, first hand, just how comforting it can be to share a difficult story with patients like me who can truly empathize with my own personal struggles. But it is the second eureka moment that I want to tell you about.

When I started working at PatientsLikeMe six months ago, I thought I basically got it. As a software engineer, there were a lot of opportunities available to me, but I chose to work at PatientsLikeMe because I could see they were an innovative company with a positive mission, passionate leaders, and energetic, thoughtful, and enthusiastic employees.

Then, a couple of weeks ago, my 12 year-old son Nolan was playing “crab soccer” in gym class. Crab soccer is like soccer, but played on all fours, with belly buttons pointing towards the caged lights in the gymnasium ceiling. Kids scuttle around trying to kick a giant ball without losing their balance. At some point during the game, Nolan bent his left hand back too far and heard a popping sound (ouch!). He went to the school nurse, and there was some swelling, so she gave him some ice and sent him back to class. Then came the sage advice of his fellow fifth graders, “It will feel better in one hour,” and “If you can move it at all, it’s not broken.” Wrong on both counts, as it turns out.

By the next morning it didn’t feel any better, and Nolan’s hand had swollen considerably. So we took him to the pediatrician. The doctor thought it was probably just sprained, but she ordered an x-ray just in case. When we met up with the pediatrician again, she showed us the images, and even to my untrained eye, there was a clear break. So they wrapped him up in a splint and gave us the contact info for a hand specialist. We left the office carrying a CD with the x-rays to bring to the specialist. Of course, being an engineer, I couldn’t help but think this system was a bit antiquated. Hand delivering a CD, I mean, really!?

But when we got home, my first thought was to pop the CD into the computer and get another look at the x-rays. I thought my wife might like to see them, as well. But when I put the CD into our home computer, there were just a bunch of weird files, no images as far as I could tell. After an hour or so of jumping through a number of technical hoops, I managed to get an application installed that could read the files on the disk. What came up wasn’t just some image files, but a medical record of sorts, with the images and a bunch of metadata. I showed the clearest x-ray to my wife. “Wow, that’s a pretty good break,” she said. “Can you send me that so I can put it on Facebook?” So I emailed it to her and I also printed out a couple of copies for Nolan to take to school and show to his friends.

The eureka moment didn’t come until I was on my way into work the next morning. Nolan and I had left the pediatrician with a CD full of useful medical data related to his condition, but the only reason we had it was so that we could deliver it to the next doctor. There was no expectation that we would actually want to look at the x-rays ourselves, and in fact doing so required technical skills beyond that of the average person. And if it had not been for the “antiquated” system in which CDs are delivered by patients, by hand, we never would have had the data in our possession at all.

How has Nolan’s experience changed your perspective on the relationship between healthcare, technology and data donation?

I know that a broken hand is small potatoes compared to what many PatientsLikeMe users have to deal with every day. But I still think there’s something to learn from this experience. Dealing with a broken hand is a pain. Nolan’s saxophone and drums are on hold. He can’t participate in all the outdoor activities he would like. But having those x-rays helps to make the experience a bit more tolerable. Having these images puts my wife, Nolan and I more in control. We have a better understanding of what is happening, and we can choose to share the information we have – how we see fit. And that is what PatientsLikeMe is all about: putting patients in control of their own health and data.

Finally, how is Nolan doing? Is he back playing drums and soccer yet?

Nolan is doing pretty well. His hand is in a splint, not a cast, which does make some things easier. And he got his friends to sign the velcro straps, so he didn’t miss out on the “fun” part of breaking a bone. But he can’t wait to get it off. Today I had to tell him he couldn’t go out and play baseball with his friends. But he can play soccer, as long as he doesn’t try to do any throw-ins. Drums and sax are still out, but he will be playing xylophone, one handed, in an upcoming school concert!

We’ll be continuing with more “Day in the life” portraits featuring PatientsLikeMe employees from different departments, so stay tuned for more! You can also check out some of our previous entries by clicking here.


Interested in joining our engineering team and making a difference in patients’ lives? Check out our Careers page to see our current job openings.


Are you at risk? American Diabetes Association Alert Day

Posted March 25th, 2014 by

 

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), over 25 million people are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States, and 7 million aren’t even aware they have the condition. What’s more, 79 million people have prediabetes, a condition that can include several symptoms of diabetes.1

Do you know if you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes? Today is American Diabetes Association Alert Day, and it’s all about learning and recognizing risk factors. Take the ADA’s online diabetes risk test to learn if you’re at high risk – it’s fast, free and easy. The ADA’s official fact sheet is also full of useful information about diabetes and today’s activities, including Step Out walks and Alert Day Center education events. Visit the ADA’s website to find an event in your area.

Living with type 2 diabetes can involve many lifestyle changes, so if you’ve been diagnosed, are living with prediabetes or are at high risk, visit the PatientsLikeMe type 2 diabetes community to check in with your fellow patients and learn how they manage their condition. You can post questions in the forum and get answers from others living with diabetes, check treatment reports to see what people are taking to manage it, and track your own symptoms to get a better understanding of your own health.


1http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/alert-day/alert-day-2014-fact-sheet.pdf

 


Give the gift of life on National Donor Day

Posted February 14th, 2014 by

Some of us might give our significant others and family members flowers and chocolates on Valentine’s Day, but did you know that February 14th is also National Donor Day? That’s right – in the spirit of love and giving, today is all about celebrating past donors and raising awareness for the five points of life: organs, tissues, marrow, platelets and blood.

There is an urgent need for donors in the world today. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services…1

  • …every 10 minutes, a patient is added to the organ donor waiting list
  • …every day, an average of 18 patients die due to a shortage of available organs
  • …in 2010, there were 2.5 million deaths in the U.S. alone – imagine if all of them were organ donors, because…
  • …right now, there are more than enough people waiting for an organ to fill a large football stadium twice over

So, how can you help?  You can register to become an organ or tissue donor, or you can find a local blood or platelet drive and register for the Be The Match national bone marrow registry.

If you have received an organ donation – or are waiting for one – you can reach out to the transplant community at PatientsLikeMe and connect with members who have received heart, kidney, liver, lung or pancreas transplants, among many other types. You can also check out the extensive PatientVoice report on what life is like after a transplant and share your experience in the PatientsLikeMe transplant forums.


1 http://www.organdonor.gov/about/data.html


Coming together to recognize World Aids Day

Posted December 1st, 2013 by

World AIDS Day. December 1We believe that the best way to live better is by sharing real-world health experiences with each other, and today, PatientsLikeMe and aids.gov are encouraging everyone to share their own stories with HIV and AIDS. The theme of this year’s World Aids Day is “Shared Responsibility: Strengthening Results for an AIDS-Free Generation,” and you can participate by reaching out and speaking with the global HIV/AIDS community.

If you’re wondering about HIV/AIDS, did you know that…

  • Over 30 million people are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide, including over a million people in the United States1
  • Many people with HIV don’t experience any symptoms until they progress toward AIDS, and as a result…1
  • 1 in 5 Americans living with HIV/AIDS are unaware of their condition2

So, how can you do your part to raise awareness today (and beyond) and help people learn more about this condition? You can:

There are over 3,500 PatientsLikeMe members sharing their journey with HIV and AIDS in the community forums. Today, and every day, you can share your own story and help change the lives of others for good.


1 http://aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/global-statistics/

2 http://aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/statistics/