13 posts tagged “2”

Food for thought: August (diet) edition

Posted August 12th, 2015 by

Many mothers have told their children “you are what you eat,” but some PatientsLikeMe members have taken that idea one step further and are using their diets to try and manage the symptoms of their conditions. People have been sharing about everything from gluten-free to vegan diets – check out what some people said in the conversations below:

“I truly believe, after 50+ years of fibromyalgia symptoms ranging from pain and depression to migraines, irritable bowel, and low thyroid, that the biggest help of all is to watch my diet, get in lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit sugar and alcohol. I supplement my fruits and veg intake with a whole food based supplement. This has allowed me to reduce medication to thyroid supplementation and a very occasional sumatriptan.”
-Fibromyalgia member on her “detox” diet

“My diet is greens, beans, nuts and seeds. Favorites are kale, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, sweet potatoes, black, pinto and kidney beans, lentils, black-eyed peas, cashews, almonds, peanuts and pistachios, flax and pumpkin seeds. I also have occasional sweet potatoes, apples, oranges and watermelon. Grains are consumed about once a week and are usually Farro or Quinoa.”
-Diabetes II member on his vegan diet

“With all my meds and other things I take for depression and the DBS, I can’t say that a gluten-free diet has been particularly whiz-bang helpful. However, I think it may have slowed my symptoms or made me feel better than I should.”

“I am also trying to stay as gluten-free and sugar-free as possible. It is a daunting exercise each day, but may be worth it long-term. I believe that diet plays a huge role in all disease states. All we can do each day, realistically, is take one day at a time and note any positive changes in our PD symptoms to gauge how we are benefitting.”
-Parkinson’s members on their gluten-free diets

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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Food for Thought: July (chocolate) edition, take 2

Posted July 7th, 2015 by

Last year, July’s Food for Thought revolved around MS members sharing their experiences with chocolate. This year, we thought we’d continue the tradition – check out what a few members had to say about their relationships with the delicious sweet:

“I have been trying a dairy free diet for a couple of months due to me having a problem with milk protein which is an antigen to the lungs and acts like any other substance that can affect our breathing. I have a treat of dark chocolate now and again and have been grateful for a plentiful supply of dairy free products.”
-IPF member

“For me, I don’t deny myself a little sweet treat.  What I do deny myself is massive amounts of sweet treats. I buy a few high quality dark chocolates and allow myself one per day. Or I buy the sugar free mousse packs in the refrigerator section or the sugar free Jell-O puddings. They seem to work. I also make my own brownies and cookies using high fiber ingredients and sugar substitutes. I have been using Xylitol with good success too.”
-Diabetes member

“I will take a teaspoon or two of coconut oil (organic, extra virgin) and add to it a bit of cocoa powder and a drop or two of Stevia to sweeten.  It tastes like real chocolate. The coconut oil is firm and melts in your mouth just like real chocolate…I can hardly tell the difference.”
-Diabetes member

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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“Focus on making small but meaningful changes” – an interview with Amy Campbell

Posted March 25th, 2015 by

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Good Measures, a company that combines the expertise of dietitians with state-of-the-art technology to help people improve their eating and exercise habits. Before joining Good Measures, Amy worked for almost 20 years at Joslin Diabetes Center, an internationally recognized diabetes treatment, research and education institution.

Amy, you have an impressive background – former nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet, just for starters. As a certified diabetes educator, you’re aware of the media buzz around the new cholesterol guidelines. What does this mean for people with type 2 diabetes – and those at risk for it?

Cholesterol guidelines have always been somewhat confusing. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert panel that provides recommendations to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, has done their homework and really examined the evidence around dietary cholesterol. The good news is that, for the first time, the committee is really downplaying the role of dietary cholesterol. In other words, for most of the population, eating foods that contain cholesterol has little if any effect on blood cholesterol levels. This is great news!

Whether or not eating eggs affects our cholesterol levels is awfully fuzzy for many people. As both a dietitian and a health professional advisor for the Egg Nutrition Center, this probably comes up a lot. What’s the latest wisdom?

For many years, health professionals, including doctors and dietitians, advised their patients to limit or even avoid eggs due to their cholesterol content. But a number of important studies have shown that dietary cholesterol (cholesterol found in food) has little effect on blood cholesterol levels. In fact, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee have dropped their recommendation that Americans limit their intake of cholesterol from foods, such as eggs and shrimp.

The data is a little less clear in terms of how dietary cholesterol might affect people who have type 2. But again, there’s no need to cut eggs out of a diabetes eating plan. In fact, if anything, eggs are a great addition because they are carbohydrate-free, rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Eggs provide many other important nutrients, as well, such as iron and vitamin D. Plus, they’re budget-friendly nutrients, as well.

Any specific suggestions for foods to eat or avoid if you want to reduce the level of “bad” (or lousy or LDL) cholesterol?

Although there’s some controversy surrounding saturated fat and how “evil” it really is, studies do show that this type of fat, found in red meat, cheese, whole milk and butter, for example, can raise LDL cholesterol levels. However, there are foods that can lower LDL cholesterol. These include foods high in soluble fiber, such as oatmeal, oat bran, beans, apples and pears. And foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts and flax seed can lower LDL levels as well.

Type 2 diabetes seems to be one of those conditions that’s closely related to lifestyle. Along with tips on nutrition, what else do your readers want in helping to manage their diabetes?

I’ve found that people who have type 2 diabetes want simple but straightforward suggestions on what they can do to live a healthy life with diabetes. Making changes to one’s eating plan can be difficult (we form our eating habits early on!), so practical pointers around food shopping, making nutritious meals and controlling portions are always helpful.

In addition, because getting and staying physically active is so important for people with diabetes, guidelines on how to fit activity into one’s daily life (like walking on your lunch break, for example, or using a resistance band while watching TV) are invaluable. Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can be stressful. Finding ways to reduce stress and to take time to relax is important. Finally, information is power. I encourage people who have diabetes to check their blood sugar levels – if not every day, at least a few times per week – to get a better understanding of how their food, activity and medications affect their diabetes control.

What about sleep? Have patients indicated that the condition seems to be associated with insomnia or sleep apnea?

Sleep is a big issue when it comes to diabetes. First, poorly controlled diabetes can keep a person from getting a good night’s sleep, especially if they’re getting up frequently to use the bathroom or get something to drink. Second, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk for sleep apnea, a serious condition whereby a person stops breathing for short periods of time while sleeping. And third, complications from diabetes, such as neuropathy, can also prevent a person from getting restful sleep.

Restless leg syndrome is another condition that interferes with sleep, and this condition is more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. A lack of sleep can increase the risk of heart disease, obesity and even type 2 diabetes. Sleep deprivation can also do a number on your immune system, meaning that you’re more likely to get sick. Sleep experts recommend aiming for about 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night.

So, if you could come up with three top bits of advice for people who live with – or want to avoid – type 2 diabetes, what would they be?

Here’s my advice: First, focus on making small but meaningful changes to your eating plan (if you need to!). You don’t need to cut out carbs or go on some stringent diet. But aim to eat plenty of “whole” foods, including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and lean protein foods. Limit processed and fast food as much as possible.

Second, be active. If going to the gym isn’t for you, no worries. Go walking. Climb stairs. March in place when you watch television or talk on the phone. Physical activity is so important to help with blood sugar control. And third, take care of yourself. This means getting enough (but not too much) sleep, managing stress and making sure you have support from family, friends, co-workers or even an online community.

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Are you at risk for diabetes? Take the test

Posted March 24th, 2015 by

Listen up: if you’re living in the United States, there’s about a 1 in 3 chance you’ll develop diabetes over the course of your lifetime. But there are many ways you can lower your risk, which is why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recognized March 24 as Diabetes ALERT! Day. Today is about raising awareness for not only those living with diabetes, but those who can still make lifestyle changes to avoid developing it.

Diabetes is one of the most common health conditions in the United States – in 2012, over 29 million Americans (almost 10 percent of the U.S. population) had some form of diabetes (learn about types of diabetes here).1 It’s also estimated that in 2010, 86 million citizens aged 20 or older had prediabetes, which if left untreated, is likely to develop into type 2 diabetes in less than 10 years. Check out the infographic below for a quick snapshot of diabetes in the U.S., courtesy of the ADA and CDC.

Today, take the ADA’s type 2 diabetes risk test and share it with your friends, family and colleagues. It only takes a few minutes to answer the multiple-choice questions – you never know what you or someone else might discover from the results. And don’t forget to highlight your participation on social media through the #DiabetesAlert hashtag.

Many PatientsLikeMe members are living with diabetes – in fact, over 16,000 with type 2 and over 2,000 with type 1. If you’ve been diagnosed, join and share your experiences with the community.

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1 http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/


Food for thought: Diabetes awareness edition

Posted November 26th, 2014 by

It’s American Diabetes Awareness Month, and the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) theme for November is “America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes.” And in that spirit, we’re highlighting the diabetes community on PatientsLikeMe. Members have been sharing about pasta, low-carb diets and ideas for daily menus. Plus, one member graciously shared her personal recipes for some of her favorite dishes – read them in the infographics below.

What’s the diabetes community sharing about?

Usually a meal of pasta and meat sauce in moderation a couple of times a month sopped up with toasted sourdough garlic bread (1 good slice) is usually enough to satisfy one’s pasta cravings. Provided you tow the line on everything else you eat you should recover from a pasta meal within 3 hours of eating it!
-Diabetic neuropathy member

I eat no starches. That is, no bread, no chips, no rice, no pizza, no potatoes, no tortillas. I severely restrict the amount of root vegetables I eat. Occasionally, I’ll have a little bit of beans. I eat very little fruit, maybe a slice or two of tomato on a burger or an occasional strawberry.
-Diabetes type 2 member

Instead of scrambled eggs, I make tofu scramble with veggies almost every weekend. Instead of store-bought cookies, I make my own gluten-free vegan version that not a single picky eater has been able to tell the difference. Instead of regular, white, flour scones, I make vegan teff-based scones with mixed berries.
Diabetes type 1 member

 

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And don’t forget to check out our other Food for Thought posts if you missed them.


It’s time to recognize mental illness in October

Posted October 6th, 2014 by

Think about this for a second; according to the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) 1 in 4 people, or 25% of American adults, will be diagnosed with a mental illness this year. On top of that, 20 percent of American children (1 in 5) will also be diagnosed. And so for 7 days, October 5th to 11th, we’ll be spreading the word for Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW).

What exactly is a mental illness? According to NAMI, A mental illness is a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. [They] are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life.”

There are many types of mental illnesses. The list includes conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar II, depression, schizophrenia and more. MIAW is about recognizing the effects of every condition and learning what it’s like to live day-to-day with a mental illness.

This week, you can get involved by reading and sharing NAMI’s fact sheet on mental illness and using NAMI’s social media badges and images on Facebook, Twitter and other sites. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #MIAW14 if you are sharing your story online. And if you’re living with a mental illness, reach out to the mental health community on PatientsLikeMe – there, you’ll find others who know exactly what you’re going through.

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Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Dana

Posted October 3rd, 2014 by

Just last month, we announced the coming together of our first-ever, patient-only Team of Advisors – a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members that will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process.

So where did we find our 2014 team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions. Over the coming months, we’d like to introduce you to each and every one of them in a new blog series: Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors. First up, Dana.

About Dana (aka roulette67)

Dana is a poet and screenplay writer living in New Jersey. She is very active in the Mental Health and Behavior forum. She is open to discussing the ups and downs of living with bipolar II and helping others through their journey. She has been through weight loss surgery three times and is very interested in the connectivity of diet to mental health—she believes that psychiatrist’s need to be aware of the whole person, and have an understanding about diet, physical health and mental health, not just focus on medication.

Dana is passionate about fighting the stigma of mental illness, which causes people to self-medicate. She believes there needs to be more positive examples on television. Here’s a fun fact about Dana: she won the people’s choice (top voted by peers) award in the PatientsLikeMe video contest for her video, I am not alone.

Dana on being part of the Team of Advisors 

It’s really quite an honor, considering the amount of people on the site. I’ve discovered what a wonderful group the advisor’s are and have had some meaningful conversations with a few of them online. I appreciate the opportunity in helping others in anyway I can to understand what we go thru on a daily basis. By getting a glimpse into the life of someone with an illness, I feel that I am educating them and helping them understand a person they might love or know or have dealings with in their own lives. And hopefully open their eyes a bit. 

Dana’s view on patient centeredness

Like those commercials for the Cancer Institute, where there are more than one doctor or professional to treat the whole patient instead of just the symptoms of one illness. Many times when you are mentally ill, it seems your body also suffers in physical ways, your diet also becomes poor. Patient-centered to me means that the doctor should look at your diet, your physical and your mental health. Just asking if you are taking your meds is not enough. Psychiatrist seem like pill dispensers and then dismiss you from their office and therapists talk, but really have no interest in the meds. More of a team effort is needed.

Dana’s contribution to researchers at the University of Maryland

PatientsLikeMe recently invited the University of Maryland (UMD) to our Cambridge office for a three day consortium that kicked off a partnership funded by their PATIENTS program, which aims to collect patient input and feedback on all phases of research, from ideas to published results. As one of the working sessions we invited Dana to join us remotely, to discuss her journey with bipolar II and share her perspective and expertise as a patient. Here’s what she experienced:

I was a little nervous at first, hoping I was able to answer their questions and provide them with what they needed to know. The questions were pretty specific at times and I found that to be interesting. Because it showed me that they really wanted to know and understand my views. I enjoyed the experience and hope that my interview helped them in some way.

I was very honest. Explained what it is like to suddenly become bipolar when you had no reference point in your life to prepare you for the physical and mental storm it brings. I stressed how it’s a 24/7 – 365 a day battle, even when the meds are working. At least in my experience it has been. I feel this was an important point to make and that they should consider this when dealing with participants in their research.

I would tell researchers moving forward to always remember the patient is more than a test subject. That what you are researching addresses them on a daily basis and some days, the best they can do is just get out of bed. That some type of break should be considered and might even work to their advantage.

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Results! PatientsLikeMe diabetes members share about challenges and concerns

Posted August 25th, 2014 by

Earlier this year, more than 450 PatientsLikeMe members from the type 1 and type 2 diabetes communities took part in a new survey from our partners at Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s Institute of Health Research. (Thank you all for adding your voices!) Members shared about everything from the day-to-day challenges of living with diabetes to the difficulties of communicating with their doctors.

 

This is real-world, patient reported health data doing good; helping others living with diabetes learn more from people just like them and showing researchers where to focus their efforts in the future. Click here to view the results.

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“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Eleanor writes about her journey with bipolar II: Part 2

Posted June 14th, 2014 by

Back in May, Eleanor (redblack) wrote about her some of her experiences with bipolar II to help spread the word for Mental Health Awareness Month. She’s continuing this month by sharing about the personal support system she’s developed through a wonderful relationship with her husband Jim, her special bond with a particular mood community member and how she’s learned about the value of sharing the “whys” of her bipolar II.

If you’ve been following along, keep an eye out! We’re going to post the third and final part of her interview in July. Miss the first part? Read that here.

The benefits of spousal support

My husband of thirty-seven years, Jim, is my strongest and most dependable support. We met forty-two years ago teaching high school in New York State. I was the single mother of two boys, four and five, who are Native American and Black on their biological father’s side. Jim was a Catholic priest. The boys soon adopted him as a father figure. We married five years later and moved to Maui. Jim adopted Mike and Mark, and later, we had James and Kalea. Before our marriage, he had already helped me through one suicide attempt.

Over the years, we have always felt we were destined to be together. I can honestly say that in forty-two years, he has never even raised his voice to me. Because of abuse in childhood and my first, brief marriage, I could not have borne it. During our marriage, he has seen me through three other suicide attempts and multiple ECT treatments.

He knows my moods and when they change. During depression, he is my cheerleader, safe harbor and my memory, celebrating the loving, talented person he believes me to be, and reminding me of all my accomplishments. When I am in the pit, he makes certain I know he is with me, but never tries to force an affection frozen within me.

As I worked the last six months to survive without my retiring psychiatrist of thirty-seven years, I have become more aware that Jim is the center of my support and always has been – not my doctor. As this realization grew, our relationship deepened. I thought I knew what a loving marriage was. However, our current relationship is stronger and more beautiful than ever. He is the one person I know who, while having no real experience of being bipolar, knows what to say, how to provide safety and strength, and how to let go when I am able to enter life again.

Support from the members of PatientsLikeMe

After ignoring the other members of PatientsLikeMe for the first few years of membership, I felt compelled to respond when several people commented on my InstantMe daily entries. I had mentioned the difficulty of finding a therapist to replace my retiring psychiatrist, and one member in particular wanted to help me. She lives in a major city and suggested I go to the nearest hospital associated with a medical school where there would be residents available for counseling. I explained here on Maui, we raise pineapples and sugar cane, and most jobs are related to the tourist industry. Hawaii is expensive and lacks mainland amenities such as many doctors from which to choose, support groups for mental health, and large shopping malls (which seem to be a priority for would-be residents).

So Kitty became my sounding board, my comrade-in-arms in the challenging world of bipolar II, and most of all, my friend! I discovered I was often more open to what she had to say than when my doctor said the same thing. Being put together very much like me, she had a perception of a situation I might find perplexing. She cut to the heart of the matter. Once, she suggested a different take on the puzzling behavior of a family member, and after following her advice, the relationship was mended.

She is funny and optimistic despite many problems, and with pretty much daily communication, we manage to keep track of each other’s ups and downs. It raises my damaged self-esteem to be able to encourage Kitty and others. I have learned that friends and family, although well-meaning, are often clueless as to the nature and future of being bipolar. Seeing from PatientsLikeMe members that this is pretty much a constant, I’ve been more at peace and even forgiving toward comments such as, “I’ve tried to help you, but you don’t make any effort,” or “Hasn’t that doctor found the right pill yet?”

Members of PatientsLikeMe also assured me by the tone of some of their entries that I am entitled to lose hope and to want to – and actually do – give up occasionally, and even be quite irritable! None of us are saints. We often feel like the last soldier standing in a curious and never-ending war – and that’s OK!

I could have used their wisdom and comfort years ago, but I’m so grateful I have access to them now. Thank you, staff of PatientsLikeMe, for making that possible.

Using patient charts and InstantMe tools

As for the charts and InstantMe tools, I am making more use of them as time passes. The charts are very helpful – and surprising – since my memory has been seriously impaired by depression. I find myself wondering, “How was it last summer?” and then can go to the charts and see immediately how I felt. Remembering the events of those months, I am often glad to see I handled things well, or sometimes, that I struggled terribly and this struggle accounted for the relationship that fell apart at that time. Seeing and using the daily InstantMe e-mail is a reminder and little push to work again.

Now that I have connections with other people on PatientsLikeMe, I find myself always filling in the comment section on InstantMe, something I originally never did. This is because I now realize the value in sharing the “whys” of my InstantMe selection. I get feedback from others and formulating a reason for my choice helps clarify it in my mind.

Reading past comments of my InstantMe, I’ve been able to spot triggers that appear again and again. I learn what feeling and experiences should be red flags for me. Often having questions or doubts about a medication, it’s so helpful to be able to find out what others have experienced with it. After all, my doctor isn’t taking it. Other members of PatientsLikeMe are!

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Food for thought: April edition

Posted April 15th, 2014 by

Everyone’s got a favorite dish (pizza is one of ours), and many PatientsLikeMe members share a bunch of their recipe ideas and foods in the forum. So, we’re going to start highlighting some of the hottest – or maybe the coolest, if you like gazpacho – conversations on the blog as part of a new “Food for thought” series. We’ll be featuring what people are saying in different condition communities.

So, what are people talking about this month?

Fibromyalgia forum thread: What did you make for dinner tonight?

“Leftover sage and rosemary soup, added mushrooms and scrambled egg batter. Stirred until cooked, added sea salt and pepper. Yummy!”

“Crock pot lamb shanks and salad.”

“A protein bar and yogurt – not hungry.”

Type 2 diabetes forum thread: High early morning blood glucose readings

Try having a low carb high protein snack at bedtime. This usually helps me have a lower reading in the morning. I have a really grainy piece of toast with peanut butter or cheese and it works wonders.”

“I eat my dinner at 4:30 or 5 p.m.  I also watch my carbs.  That helps me get the sugar down in the morning.

“At night for a snack and hour or so before bed I might have a piece of celery with peanut butter.

Multiple sclerosis forum thread: Different diets and reactions

“I have to say, the flavor of grass-fed beef is far superior to that of the ‘conventionally raised’ beef.”

“I have gone with the Mediterranean diet and it seems to have helped me physically. Not so much neurologically, though

Does any of that sound familiar? If you are living with fibromyalgia, diabetes type 2 or multiple sclerosis, join PatientsLikeMe and jump into a conversation in the forum, or start a new thread of your own. Sharing experiences has never tasted so good!


“I would just like to understand the ‘why’” – a conversation with PD community member dropsies

Posted April 14th, 2014 by

Right at the start of April, you might have seen us post on the blog that it’s Parkinson’s (PD) Awareness Month. And to keep Parkinson’s awareness going strong all month long, we’re sharing a recent interview with PatientsLikeMe member Betty – aka dropsies to those in the community. She was diagnosed with Parkinson’s back in 2009, but was experiencing symptoms since way back in 2005. And just at the start of 2014, she was also diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Check out her interview below where she shares about her frustrating Parkinson’s diagnosis experience, how diabetes might impact her future eating habits and what she means by a family of ‘co-takers.’

Tell us about your initial diagnosis experience with Parkinson’s – on your PatientsLikeMe profile, you mention your symptoms aren’t “textbook” – what are they like?

My diagnostic tale has been long, complicated, and oftentimes frustrating, like many PWP experiences, and has yet to come to a medically-agreed upon final conclusion. I don’t care what it’s called. I would just like to understand “why” before I’m actually confined to life in a wheelchair.

After two years of thorough investigation, working with my PCP and including cardiac and rheumatology examinations, my neurologist eliminated many possibilities, with testing for lyme disease and lupus being repeated. The only confirmed diagnoses to be made were narcolepsy without cataplexy, a condition my history showed I’d had since childhood, but  escalated with menopause and restless leg syndrome (RLS).

Three years later, after aggressive treatment to control the narcolepsy and RLS, the unexplained issues continued to worsen. The increasing difficulties were with balance, loss of dexterity, freezing at step-ups, dystonia, shuffling gait, physical restlessness, exertion tremors with pronounced shortness of breath, full body muscle pain and stiffness, arms clinging to the body, and index or middle finger fidgeting the thumb, most presenting intermittently with no definitive pattern. I was referred to an MDS in May of 2009 who reviewed the battery of tests, labs, and imagery from the previous 5 years, conducted a clinical examination, waited 4 months and repeated the examination to conclude “an undefined movement disorder, prominent on the left, not rapidly progressing (therefore not of immediate concern) but probably early Parkinson’s Disease”. I was put back under the care of my primary neurologist with additional dosages of Mirapex, already being taken for RLS, and life continued on.

Within the year occasional episodes of Choreoathetosis greatly disturbed co-workers and friends, and as my lack of alertness became alarmingly severe despite an increase in Provigil, the Mirapex was reduced back to bedtime only. It was clear that treating my Parkinson’s symptoms was not going to be easy with narcolepsy. Under a new supervisor, my job duties were reviewed and adjustments made, but it was still a position that required a great deal of personal interaction, and eventually it was determined that I could no longer meet expectations. I was losing the ability to comprehend, think, and speak “in real time.” I moved back “home” and began the task of making a new and very different life.

My current PCP, who cautiously agrees it’s Parkinson’s, is very supportive and wants very much to improve my quality of life. I have been referred to two neurologists within the last 5 months, neither an MDS, but both, within the first 5 minutes of a single office visit and without my medical records, have dismissed the 2009 diagnosis with no further investigation planned, or even offered. One, who felt cog-wheel rigidity in my left wrist, said “it’s complicated,” but why no genetic testing, no PET or SPECT, and why wasn’t a trial of Sinemet given? The other said I don’t have resting tremor, he found no cog-wheel rigidity, and I show facial expression, so it can’t be Parkinson’s, so there’s no reason to try Sinemet.

It takes approximately 18 hours of continuous observation in a simulated home environment using standardized methodology to gather the data necessary to diagnose narcolepsy, so how can movement disorders, with such a wide array of possibilities and variations, be properly diagnosed in randomly performed clinical examinations generally lasting less than 45 minutes in total?

Your oldest son is now your caretaker, and you mentioned the difficulty of the role reversal, can you tell us about that?

It’s become more of a shared role between both my sons, although the youngest doesn’t live nearby.

It has taken time for all of us to adjust to the changes, and although it will be a continuing adjustment, what I thought I had lost as a mother is not lost after all. I came to realize that I still needed to hold on to being Momma. I had to see that I still have the opportunity to teach my children by example. And they had to realize they still needed me to lean on from time to time and to offer thoughts for their consideration when making decisions. Sure, some things have changed a little, but then the small stuff has always been a moving target.

Twenty-five years ago I’d stay in the car while my oldest went into the neighborhood store alone to make a purchase. Now I sit in the car while he goes into a store to make a purchase for me. So I sit in the car . . . nothing new, just different reasons. Fifteen years ago I’d tell my youngest it was a FYOS night because I had too much work to finish. Now I may tell him to help himself with whatever he can find, but I’m not feeling up to eating anything for a while. So he fixes his own supper . . . nothing new, just different reasons.

What I had to realize is that we are still what we’ve always been. We are family, co-caretakers of each other. We are learning to work together again, just as we did when they were still living at home. Only the reasons have changed.

You’re super active when it comes to filling out your health profile on PatientsLikeMe — how do the tools help you track your health, and what have you learned?

One thing that I have definitely learned is that once a symptom becomes a daily standard, I don’t necessarily notice or remember it unless it was severe or continuous that day. I may have a single incidence of freezing early in the day and if I don’t fall from it, or have a great deal of difficulty breaking loose from it, I completely forget about it by the time I do my symptom update.

I’m certainly learning there’s no predictability! I keep thinking that I’ll see some kind of pattern, but nothing has appeared as yet. I can have symptoms causing me great difficulty for weeks at a time and suddenly disappear for months before being noticed in the slightest again. And others are always with me, but other than the obvious, such as loss of coordination and falls, and stress effects, there’s no pattern or connection, even in the level of severity.

You’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. How has another diagnosis impacted your Parkinson’s and day-to-day life? 

So far it’s been a blessing. I put on a great deal of weight since I began this journey, and with little pleasures left to be enjoyed and apathy holding my focus to the simple pleasure of food, I needed a wake-up call! If I’m ever prescribed Sinemet or any Levodopa, I know I’ll have to reevaluate my eating plan to compensate for the protein conflict, but for now I’m trying to stay focused on controlling my diabetes and losing as much weight as I safely can.

It’s probably a first, but I was disappointed that I did not experience the most common side effect of my diabetic medication, Metformin. Both the doctor and the pharmacist gave stern warning that it causes severe diarrhea in the first few weeks. With the constant battle of constipation PWP endure, I was looking forward to it, but it never happened! No change in that situation at all.

Finally, April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. You mentioned fitting into a world that ‘doesn’t know’ what it’s like. What would you like to teach people about Parkinson’s?

The most important thing from my perspective would be that Parkinson’s is not fully visible! Besides the mental and emotional changes caused by the altered state of brain neurotransmitters, there are other non-motor symptoms caused by Parkinson’s. Even tremors are not always “visible.”

One of my earliest and continuing issues is Akathisia, better known as internal tremor and restlessness. There are times that if what I feel could be seen, it would look as if I was holding a live electrical wire. I’ve day-dreamed of a torture rack and how wonderful it would feel to be stretched until it stopped. Thankfully, this level of severity is rare for me. It’s more subtle most of the time. It’s a feeling that doesn’t allow me to sit or stand still. Regardless of the fatigue and pain that builds, sitting to rest is worse. The only thing that brings any relief is to keep moving. If I stop in one place I rock. If I must sit I fidget until I can’t take it anymore and I get up and start pacing, stretching, moving! If it’s confined to just the arms, wrapping in a massaging chair pad can ease it in time, but usually it’s full body and the only solution is to keep moving until it settles, often taking hours!

Akathisia is a little-studied, sporadic symptom in about 26% of PWP, and is only one symptom of Parkinson’s that is visible, although it leads to very visible attempts to get relief. Some of the other non-motor function symptoms PWP often face are constipation, bladder incontinence, difficulty swallowing, gum and dental deterioration, excessive sweating, intolerance to heat and cold, daytime sleepiness, pain, vision issues, loss of taste and smell, memory loss, difficulty with word recall, and apathy. Parkinson’s Disease does not stop with making slow, stooped, stiff, shaky people…it’s so much more!

Betty Bland

a.k.a. “dropsies”


Patients as Partners: The WHYSTOP Scale questionnaire results

Posted April 4th, 2014 by

We’re really excited to launch a new series here on the blog called Patients as Partners. The series will highlight the results and feedback that PatientsLikeMe members give on questionnaires from our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform.

What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

So to kick the series off, we have results from the WHYSTOP Scale, which measures how diabetes can impact appetite and how people decide when they’re done with a meal. Back in September, we launched this as one of the first-ever questionnaires on ORE with our research partner William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, from the Behavioral Diabetes Institute and University of California, San Diego. More than 700 type 2 diabetes community members added their voices, and all of the answers and feedback shaped and influenced the health measure to make it the best possible. (Shout out and thank you to all those that participated!) Check out the WHYSTOP survey results and keep an eye out for more ORE questionnaire results coming up as we continue our Patients as Partners series.

 

 

 


Uniting for World Diabetes Day and American Diabetes Month

Posted November 14th, 2013 by

unite for diabetesDiabetes is one of the most widespread conditions in the world.1 Globally, more than 370 million people are living with diabetes, including over 25 million in the United States alone.2 And throughout November, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) will raise awareness about everything diabetes, from risk factors and genetics to proper diet and blood sugar testing. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has also named today, November 14th, World Diabetes Day, and now is the time to start sharing your experiences with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes mellitus sometimes gets lumped into a singular condition, but as you probably know, there are actually two very different kinds of diabetes, labeled type 1 and 2 (There is a third type, known as gestational diabetes that can sometimes occur during pregnancy but is not necessarily permanent). Type 2 is by far the most common, and the IDF’s website has a great infographic explaining the basics.

stop diabetes

So what’s going on this month? Both the ADA and the IDF are coordinating a ton of ways to promote diabetes awareness during November, and if you’re unsure where to begin, here are a few ideas to check out:

 

 

What’s going on at PatientsLikeMe for diabetes?

 

Just recently, nearly 600 diabetes members filled out the 17-item Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS), which measures the amount and types of problems diabetes can cause in a person’s life. Check out the complete results here.

The community also just participated in one of our very first Open Research Exchange (ORE) questionnaires. In fact, more that 700 diabetes members added their voice to it. PatientsLikeMe’s pilot research partner Dr. William Polonsky is developing the WHY STOP scale on ORE, which will help us all understand if we’re eating a meal, how do we decide we’re done. Stay tuned for more info and the complete results!

Finally, check out our interview with Dr. Richard A. Jackson, who shared some of his thoughts with us last June. He’s currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and also the former Director of the Hood Center for the Prevention of Childhood Diabetes at The Joslin Diabetes Center. Richard has been studying diabetes for over 30 years – he even led the first National Institutes of Health clinical trial to study diabetes prevention.

There are over 13,000 PatientsLikeMe members currently living with diabetes, and many of them have been sharing their experiences and contributing to real-world research that could benefit their fellow diabetes patients. If you’re living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you can find others just like you on PatientsLikeMe. Track your own experience with a personal health profile, or share your story in the community forums to start living better together, during American Diabetes Month and all year long.


1 http://www.cdc.gov/features/dsdiabetestrends/

2 http://www.idf.org/worlddiabetesday/toolkit/gp/facts-figures