6 posts tagged “1”

Food for thought: August (diet) edition

Posted August 12th, 2015 by

Many mothers have told their children “you are what you eat,” but some PatientsLikeMe members have taken that idea one step further and are using their diets to try and manage the symptoms of their conditions. People have been sharing about everything from gluten-free to vegan diets – check out what some people said in the conversations below:

“I truly believe, after 50+ years of fibromyalgia symptoms ranging from pain and depression to migraines, irritable bowel, and low thyroid, that the biggest help of all is to watch my diet, get in lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit sugar and alcohol. I supplement my fruits and veg intake with a whole food based supplement. This has allowed me to reduce medication to thyroid supplementation and a very occasional sumatriptan.”
-Fibromyalgia member on her “detox” diet

“My diet is greens, beans, nuts and seeds. Favorites are kale, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, carrots, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, sweet potatoes, black, pinto and kidney beans, lentils, black-eyed peas, cashews, almonds, peanuts and pistachios, flax and pumpkin seeds. I also have occasional sweet potatoes, apples, oranges and watermelon. Grains are consumed about once a week and are usually Farro or Quinoa.”
-Diabetes II member on his vegan diet

“With all my meds and other things I take for depression and the DBS, I can’t say that a gluten-free diet has been particularly whiz-bang helpful. However, I think it may have slowed my symptoms or made me feel better than I should.”

“I am also trying to stay as gluten-free and sugar-free as possible. It is a daunting exercise each day, but may be worth it long-term. I believe that diet plays a huge role in all disease states. All we can do each day, realistically, is take one day at a time and note any positive changes in our PD symptoms to gauge how we are benefitting.”
-Parkinson’s members on their gluten-free diets

If you missed our other Food for Thought posts, read the previous editions here.

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“Focus on making small but meaningful changes” – an interview with Amy Campbell

Posted March 25th, 2015 by

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Good Measures, a company that combines the expertise of dietitians with state-of-the-art technology to help people improve their eating and exercise habits. Before joining Good Measures, Amy worked for almost 20 years at Joslin Diabetes Center, an internationally recognized diabetes treatment, research and education institution.

Amy, you have an impressive background – former nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet, just for starters. As a certified diabetes educator, you’re aware of the media buzz around the new cholesterol guidelines. What does this mean for people with type 2 diabetes – and those at risk for it?

Cholesterol guidelines have always been somewhat confusing. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert panel that provides recommendations to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, has done their homework and really examined the evidence around dietary cholesterol. The good news is that, for the first time, the committee is really downplaying the role of dietary cholesterol. In other words, for most of the population, eating foods that contain cholesterol has little if any effect on blood cholesterol levels. This is great news!

Whether or not eating eggs affects our cholesterol levels is awfully fuzzy for many people. As both a dietitian and a health professional advisor for the Egg Nutrition Center, this probably comes up a lot. What’s the latest wisdom?

For many years, health professionals, including doctors and dietitians, advised their patients to limit or even avoid eggs due to their cholesterol content. But a number of important studies have shown that dietary cholesterol (cholesterol found in food) has little effect on blood cholesterol levels. In fact, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee have dropped their recommendation that Americans limit their intake of cholesterol from foods, such as eggs and shrimp.

The data is a little less clear in terms of how dietary cholesterol might affect people who have type 2. But again, there’s no need to cut eggs out of a diabetes eating plan. In fact, if anything, eggs are a great addition because they are carbohydrate-free, rich in protein and low in saturated fat. Eggs provide many other important nutrients, as well, such as iron and vitamin D. Plus, they’re budget-friendly nutrients, as well.

Any specific suggestions for foods to eat or avoid if you want to reduce the level of “bad” (or lousy or LDL) cholesterol?

Although there’s some controversy surrounding saturated fat and how “evil” it really is, studies do show that this type of fat, found in red meat, cheese, whole milk and butter, for example, can raise LDL cholesterol levels. However, there are foods that can lower LDL cholesterol. These include foods high in soluble fiber, such as oatmeal, oat bran, beans, apples and pears. And foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts and flax seed can lower LDL levels as well.

Type 2 diabetes seems to be one of those conditions that’s closely related to lifestyle. Along with tips on nutrition, what else do your readers want in helping to manage their diabetes?

I’ve found that people who have type 2 diabetes want simple but straightforward suggestions on what they can do to live a healthy life with diabetes. Making changes to one’s eating plan can be difficult (we form our eating habits early on!), so practical pointers around food shopping, making nutritious meals and controlling portions are always helpful.

In addition, because getting and staying physically active is so important for people with diabetes, guidelines on how to fit activity into one’s daily life (like walking on your lunch break, for example, or using a resistance band while watching TV) are invaluable. Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can be stressful. Finding ways to reduce stress and to take time to relax is important. Finally, information is power. I encourage people who have diabetes to check their blood sugar levels – if not every day, at least a few times per week – to get a better understanding of how their food, activity and medications affect their diabetes control.

What about sleep? Have patients indicated that the condition seems to be associated with insomnia or sleep apnea?

Sleep is a big issue when it comes to diabetes. First, poorly controlled diabetes can keep a person from getting a good night’s sleep, especially if they’re getting up frequently to use the bathroom or get something to drink. Second, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk for sleep apnea, a serious condition whereby a person stops breathing for short periods of time while sleeping. And third, complications from diabetes, such as neuropathy, can also prevent a person from getting restful sleep.

Restless leg syndrome is another condition that interferes with sleep, and this condition is more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t. A lack of sleep can increase the risk of heart disease, obesity and even type 2 diabetes. Sleep deprivation can also do a number on your immune system, meaning that you’re more likely to get sick. Sleep experts recommend aiming for about 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night.

So, if you could come up with three top bits of advice for people who live with – or want to avoid – type 2 diabetes, what would they be?

Here’s my advice: First, focus on making small but meaningful changes to your eating plan (if you need to!). You don’t need to cut out carbs or go on some stringent diet. But aim to eat plenty of “whole” foods, including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and lean protein foods. Limit processed and fast food as much as possible.

Second, be active. If going to the gym isn’t for you, no worries. Go walking. Climb stairs. March in place when you watch television or talk on the phone. Physical activity is so important to help with blood sugar control. And third, take care of yourself. This means getting enough (but not too much) sleep, managing stress and making sure you have support from family, friends, co-workers or even an online community.

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Are you at risk for diabetes? Take the test

Posted March 24th, 2015 by

Listen up: if you’re living in the United States, there’s about a 1 in 3 chance you’ll develop diabetes over the course of your lifetime. But there are many ways you can lower your risk, which is why the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recognized March 24 as Diabetes ALERT! Day. Today is about raising awareness for not only those living with diabetes, but those who can still make lifestyle changes to avoid developing it.

Diabetes is one of the most common health conditions in the United States – in 2012, over 29 million Americans (almost 10 percent of the U.S. population) had some form of diabetes (learn about types of diabetes here).1 It’s also estimated that in 2010, 86 million citizens aged 20 or older had prediabetes, which if left untreated, is likely to develop into type 2 diabetes in less than 10 years. Check out the infographic below for a quick snapshot of diabetes in the U.S., courtesy of the ADA and CDC.

Today, take the ADA’s type 2 diabetes risk test and share it with your friends, family and colleagues. It only takes a few minutes to answer the multiple-choice questions – you never know what you or someone else might discover from the results. And don’t forget to highlight your participation on social media through the #DiabetesAlert hashtag.

Many PatientsLikeMe members are living with diabetes – in fact, over 16,000 with type 2 and over 2,000 with type 1. If you’ve been diagnosed, join and share your experiences with the community.

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1 http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/


Food for thought: Diabetes awareness edition

Posted November 26th, 2014 by

It’s American Diabetes Awareness Month, and the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) theme for November is “America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes.” And in that spirit, we’re highlighting the diabetes community on PatientsLikeMe. Members have been sharing about pasta, low-carb diets and ideas for daily menus. Plus, one member graciously shared her personal recipes for some of her favorite dishes – read them in the infographics below.

What’s the diabetes community sharing about?

Usually a meal of pasta and meat sauce in moderation a couple of times a month sopped up with toasted sourdough garlic bread (1 good slice) is usually enough to satisfy one’s pasta cravings. Provided you tow the line on everything else you eat you should recover from a pasta meal within 3 hours of eating it!
-Diabetic neuropathy member

I eat no starches. That is, no bread, no chips, no rice, no pizza, no potatoes, no tortillas. I severely restrict the amount of root vegetables I eat. Occasionally, I’ll have a little bit of beans. I eat very little fruit, maybe a slice or two of tomato on a burger or an occasional strawberry.
-Diabetes type 2 member

Instead of scrambled eggs, I make tofu scramble with veggies almost every weekend. Instead of store-bought cookies, I make my own gluten-free vegan version that not a single picky eater has been able to tell the difference. Instead of regular, white, flour scones, I make vegan teff-based scones with mixed berries.
Diabetes type 1 member

 

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And don’t forget to check out our other Food for Thought posts if you missed them.


Results! PatientsLikeMe diabetes members share about challenges and concerns

Posted August 25th, 2014 by

Earlier this year, more than 450 PatientsLikeMe members from the type 1 and type 2 diabetes communities took part in a new survey from our partners at Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s Institute of Health Research. (Thank you all for adding your voices!) Members shared about everything from the day-to-day challenges of living with diabetes to the difficulties of communicating with their doctors.

 

This is real-world, patient reported health data doing good; helping others living with diabetes learn more from people just like them and showing researchers where to focus their efforts in the future. Click here to view the results.

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Uniting for World Diabetes Day and American Diabetes Month

Posted November 14th, 2013 by

unite for diabetesDiabetes is one of the most widespread conditions in the world.1 Globally, more than 370 million people are living with diabetes, including over 25 million in the United States alone.2 And throughout November, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) will raise awareness about everything diabetes, from risk factors and genetics to proper diet and blood sugar testing. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has also named today, November 14th, World Diabetes Day, and now is the time to start sharing your experiences with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes mellitus sometimes gets lumped into a singular condition, but as you probably know, there are actually two very different kinds of diabetes, labeled type 1 and 2 (There is a third type, known as gestational diabetes that can sometimes occur during pregnancy but is not necessarily permanent). Type 2 is by far the most common, and the IDF’s website has a great infographic explaining the basics.

stop diabetes

So what’s going on this month? Both the ADA and the IDF are coordinating a ton of ways to promote diabetes awareness during November, and if you’re unsure where to begin, here are a few ideas to check out:

 

 

What’s going on at PatientsLikeMe for diabetes?

 

Just recently, nearly 600 diabetes members filled out the 17-item Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS), which measures the amount and types of problems diabetes can cause in a person’s life. Check out the complete results here.

The community also just participated in one of our very first Open Research Exchange (ORE) questionnaires. In fact, more that 700 diabetes members added their voice to it. PatientsLikeMe’s pilot research partner Dr. William Polonsky is developing the WHY STOP scale on ORE, which will help us all understand if we’re eating a meal, how do we decide we’re done. Stay tuned for more info and the complete results!

Finally, check out our interview with Dr. Richard A. Jackson, who shared some of his thoughts with us last June. He’s currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and also the former Director of the Hood Center for the Prevention of Childhood Diabetes at The Joslin Diabetes Center. Richard has been studying diabetes for over 30 years – he even led the first National Institutes of Health clinical trial to study diabetes prevention.

There are over 13,000 PatientsLikeMe members currently living with diabetes, and many of them have been sharing their experiences and contributing to real-world research that could benefit their fellow diabetes patients. If you’re living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you can find others just like you on PatientsLikeMe. Track your own experience with a personal health profile, or share your story in the community forums to start living better together, during American Diabetes Month and all year long.


1 http://www.cdc.gov/features/dsdiabetestrends/

2 http://www.idf.org/worlddiabetesday/toolkit/gp/facts-figures