10 posts from June, 2014

Keeping up awareness for PTSD

Posted June 27th, 2014 by

 

Back in the beginning of June, we posted about PTSD Awareness Month, and now, we’re keeping the awareness going strong for PTSD Awareness Day. To help put a face on PTSD, we shared a bunch of videos from AboutFace, a website produced by the National Center for PTSD that’s all about telling real stories of veterans living with the condition. To get a different perspective, we also thought we’d share a few of their video interviews with clinicians. Here are some to check out…

 

Stephanie Dove
Social worker

My advice to you- “I meet a lot of veterans who don’t want to come to the VA for treatment … because they’re afraid of the stigma. PTSD is a normal, understandable reaction to the experiences that many veterans have been through…”

Dr. Ron Acierno
Clinical Psychologist

How to know you’re ready for help- “Well, if you wait, you’re never going to be ready. Getting ready for treatment is like ‘how do I know I’m ready to get in better shape?’ If you’re feeling pain, you’re ready for treatment.”

Dr. Sonya Norman
Clinical Psychologist

What treatment can do for you- “Feeling better can mean so many different things to different people. For some people enjoying their marriage again, enjoying their family …. it could ‘I’m just enjoying life again.’”

And just this month, One Mind and PatientsLikeMe announced a new multi-year collaboration to help the millions of people worldwide who are experiencing post-traumatic stress (PTS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both. The two organizations will work together to expand and enhance the PatientsLikeMe online registry experience for people with these conditions, to provide better resources for day-to-day living, and to capture more patient-reported data for research. Check out full the collaboration announcement.

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for PTSD Awareness Day.

 


Awareness, prevention, education, and family – the four goals of Men’s Health Month

Posted June 26th, 2014 by

 

This June marks the 20th anniversary of Men’s Health Month, first created by the U.S. Congress and a few other organizations in 1994. Men’s Health Month is all about heightening awareness of preventable health problems and encouraging early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.1 This year, the campaign has four goals: awareness, prevention, education, and family.

 

 

 

Awareness: Men are at a greater risk for certain health conditions than women, besides the conditions that affect male-specific organs. This includes hypertension, high cholesterol and cancers of the skin, lungs and colon.2 But awareness isn’t just about these different conditions, it’s also about the fake treatments out there, and the Men’s Health Network has put together a great infographic that talks about counterfeit medications.

Prevention: Besides being male, many risk factors contribute to the development of these health conditions. Some of these can be managed with proper diet, exercise and other tactics, but regular screening is the best way to find a problem early. Make sure you discuss screening options with your doctor and know when and where you should go.

Education: It’s not just about raising awareness in June or even the rest of the year – it’s about teaching everyone about men’s health each and every day. As a result, the Men’s Health Network has shared a Key Health Indicators document full of information on heart disease prevalence, obesity rates and more – check it out here.

Family: If you’re a partner, brother, sister, child, cousin or even just a friend, we’re all here to support the men in our lives when they are diagnosed with a health condition.

If you’re looking to connect with others about men’s health issues, check out the forum on PatientsLikeMe – here, the men (and women) of the community chat about all things related to men’s health, and members are always happy to answer any questions you might have.

Share this post on twitter and help spread the word for men’s health.


1 http://www.menshealthmonth.org/

2 http://www.menshealthnetwork.org/library/causesofdeath.pdf