2 posts tagged “SLE”

Lupus and period problems, explained

Posted 11 months ago by

Are you living with lupus (SLE) and experiencing problems with your monthly period? (Like, not getting it. Or having a really heavy, long period.) And have you ever wondered how lupus might play a role in this? Read on.

What does the research show?

Small studies have found that people with SLE are at greater risk of menstrual irregularities compared to the general/healthy population. The greatest type of irregularity appears to be sustained amenorrhoea (long-term absence of a period). Some people with SLE experience premature menopause.

These factors may increase the risk of period irregularities:

Young people (17 and under) with juvenile SLE also experience period irregularity and hormone abnormalities, research has shown.

If you’re not getting your period (at any age), tell your doctor and ask how your lupus, treatments and other factors (such as menopause or any other health conditions you may have, like polycystic ovary syndrome) could be affecting “Aunt Flo.”

If you are getting a heavy or prolonged period, it’s also important to talk with your doctor and get checked for anemia, which is already a common problem in people with lupus.

Some women find it helpful to track their period (or lack thereof) on paper or in an app (like one of these) so you can keep close tabs on your cycle.

Period talk on PatientsLikeMe

In our community forums, no issue is taboo. Join PatientsLikeMe or log in to access the following links. Some members have asked about lupus and periods in the forums, including whether some medications may cause irregular or stopped periods and how to manage heavy periods and flares during menstruation.

“I realized that menstruation can cause your body to really go bananas with your lupus,” one member says.

Members have also discussed the related topics of lupus and pregnancypelvic pain and menopause.

Any period issues (or helpful hints) you’d like to discuss? Sign in to connect with the lupus community (36K+ members) and talk about this topic or any other aspect of life with SLE.


Join the Band: Raising Our Voices for Lupus Awareness

Posted May 10th, 2011 by
“I was diagnosed with lupus (SLE) at age 20 and had already lost about 60% of my kidney function. I had chemotherapy for nine months along with intense steroid therapy. I thankfully went into remission and have been since four months after my diagnosis. I still struggle with fatigue and kidney problems although I was transplanted in 2004. I will need another transplant most likely within the next year or two.”

Lupus patient, age 30

Lupus Foundation of America

May is Lupus Awareness Month, and today, May 10, is World Lupus Day.

Since PatientsLikeMe began welcoming all patients last month, we have quickly become home to more than 100 members with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the most common form of this chronic autoimmune disorder that can affect any organ system in the body, including the heart, kidneys, lungs, joints and skin.

Here are some quick facts about SLE gleaned from our new members.

What is the gender breakdown?

What are the top treatments?

What are the major symptoms?

What can you do to increase awareness about lupus?   One very visible sign of support is wearing a wristband.  At the Lupus Foundation of America, the theme for this year’s awareness month is “Band Together for Lupus,” complete with accompanying purple wristbands.  You can also send an awareness e-card and download a flyer and logo for World Lupus Day, which you can then post on Facebook or other social media sites.

Finally, you can click here to sign the World Lupus Day pledge and watch a video featuring spokesperson Julian Lennon, the son of John Lennon.  He explains how the Beatles’ famous song “Lucy in the Sky” was written about his childhood friend Lucy, who passed away from lupus.

PatientsLikeMe member emorgan