2 posts tagged “Seroquel”

A Peek at the December Newsletters for Members

Posted December 21st, 2011 by

What kinds of things do we cover in our monthly newsletters for members? Take a look at the excerpt below from our December edition. Also, in case you didn’t know, anyone – whether a PatientsLikeMe member or not – can view our current and past newsletters in our Newsletter Archive. See what we’ve been up to recently, and if you are member who’s not opted in to the newsletter, sign up today.

MONTHLY MUSINGS

Can’t sleep this holiday season?  It’s not just you.  Did you know that…

  • More than 23,000 of you – nearly a fifth of all PatientsLikeMe members – report insomnia?
  • People with insomnia may also experience impaired function, mood issues (e.g. irritabilityanxiety) and daytime drowsiness as a result?
  • There are two forms of insomnia:  secondary (where it’s the symptom or side effect of something else) and primary (where it is its own disorder)?
  • Members with insomnia have shared their experiences via hundreds of treatment evaluations for prescription drugs such as AmbienTrazodoneSeroquel and Lunesta?
  • Members have also evaluated over-the-counter (OTC) sleep aids like diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and Melatonin as well as herbal supplements such as Valerian and Passionflower?
  • There are numerous forum discussions about insomnia, including the six featured below in “Join the Conversation”?

Finally, here’s something else to know.  Logging onto to the PatientsLikeMe forum in the dead of the night can be a great help.  It may not cure your insomnia, but chances are, you’ll find several others who are awake and going through the same thing.

Here’s hoping your holidays are as restful and joyful as possible.

– KateEmmaLizJeanetteSharry

Kate"" Emma"" Jeanette"" Sharry""

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

What’s happening in the forum in the midnight hour?  Check out some of these insightful threads about insomnia below.  Then jump in with your own questions and answers.

Need help with something on the site?  Visit the PatientsLikeMe Site Help Room for answers from veteran members.

THIS MONTH’S SITE IMPROVEMENTS

Thanks for your continued feedback about improving the site.  Here are our top functionality enhancements for December.

UPGRADED LABS AND TESTS
There are new labs and tests you can monitor at PatientsLikeMe. Use the search tool or browse the list to see what’s now available, including Blood Glucose, Ejection Fraction, PSA, Creatinine, AST and more.  Don’t see the lab or test that you’d like to monitor?  Email us at dataintegrity@patientslikeme.com with your request.

CLICKABLE CONDITION NAMES ON PROFILES
You can now click on the condition name in the header of any profile, including your own, to view the new-and-improved condition page.  Checking out someone’s profile and see a disease you don’t recognize? Simply click through to learn more.  Or from your own profile, click through on any of your conditions to see who else has it, the most commonly reported treatments and much more.


Life with Bipolar I Disorder: What We’ve Learned

Posted December 9th, 2011 by

Yesterday, our interview with bipolar blogger Andrea gave you a glimpse into what it’s like to live with bipolar I disorder.  Today we take a deeper look into this mental health condition using the data and experiences shared by our 1,237 bipolar I members.

First off, however, you may have heard of something called bipolar II as well, so let’s talk about how bipolar I and II differ.  Bipolar I is a subdiagnosis of bipolar disorder that conforms to the classic concept of manic-depressive illness.  It is characterized by at least one manic or mixed episode, and there may be episodes of hypomania (marked by elevated mood, hyperactivity and grandiosity) and major depression as well.  In contrast, bipolar II disorder – which is slightly more prevalent at PatientsLikeMe with 1,556 patients reporting it – is marked by depressive episodes that are more frequent and more intense than the manic episodes.

A Snapshot of the Bipolar I Community at PatientsLikeMe

Now, let’s take a look at the wealth of data found at PatientsLikeMe.  To give you a sense of the makeup of our bipolar I patients, 74% are female, more than 78% have an official bipolar I diagnosis, and approximately 40% report experiencing their first symptom prior to the age of 19.  What exactly are the symptoms of this condition?  Some of the most commonly reported include delusions, excitability, flight of ideas, grandiose thinking, hallucinations, irritability and paranoia.  As you can see, most of these speak to the “manic” side of bipolar I disorder, which involves “excitement of psychotic proportions” as well as hyperactive, disorganized behavior.

As Andrea’s interview yesterday revealed, treating bipolar I disorder can mean treating both mania and depression simultaneously.  Further, our patient-reported data shows that the two prescription medications she takes currently – lithium for mania and Lamictal for depression – are among the most commonly prescribed treatments for bipolar I patients, along with individual therapy and Seroquel.  How well do these treatments work?  Click on each treatment name to read our patients’ evaluations of their effectiveness, side effects, cost and more.

Finally, much can also be learned directly from the experiences our patients share on their profiles, treatment evaluations or forum posts.  We leave you with several patient quotes from our Mental Health and Behavior Forum that help to fully illuminate life with bipolar I disorder:

  • “My manias last for about three to four months and are followed by depressions that tend to also last three to four months.  Mine is the classic form of the disease with manias characterized by hallucinations, grandiosity, and impulsivity, and depressions characterized by fatigue, guilt, and somatic concerns.”
  • “The condition is every part of me as anything else. My choice to treat it arises from the consequences of living with bipolar in a non-bipolar world and not because I am broken and in need of repair. Bipolar “disorder”, well, whose order am I in disarray?”
  • “Now I’m a little manic.  I know what you mean about relentless depressions.  I have those too.  At the other end of the spectrum, I become psychotic.  That’s the part that really frightens me and usually lands me in the hospital, or worse.”
  • “A month ago, I truly would have been leveled by all this drama.  I’ve come quite a distance in a short period of time.  You guys give me such strength.  I know that with your help, I can make it through life’s ups and downs while keeping mine under control.”

If you’ve got something to share about bipolar I as well, join the conversation today!