sclerosis

Myths vs. facts about multiple sclerosis

Stop! What do you know about multiple sclerosis (MS)? That’s the question we’re asking during MS Awareness Month. We’ve heard from many community members that people don’t always get what it’s like to live with MS, and that there’s wrong information out there. So as part of ongoing awareness efforts, we created shareable photos that will hopefully dispel some of the myths surrounding the neurological condition. There are 13 shareable infographics in total – click here to view the gallery.  Don’t forget to use the #MSawareness hashtag when you post on your Facebook or Twitter. Let’s kick things into high gear and start dispelling myths about MS this month so that everyone is armed with better information all year round. What’s the community saying? “The stigma associated with MS far outweighs any benefits that come from awareness, from my personal experience. To be very honest, no one cares unless it happens to them, and people perceive being sick as a weakness” -MS forum thread “I have only been offended two times in 20 years by strangers. Family, now that’s a different story – stigma runs rampant there when it comes to MS.” -MS forum thread “A society that attaches a …

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Hacking our way to new and better treatments with integrated biology

When it comes to discovery and healthcare advancements, too many of us are more focused on the processes we use today rather than at a first principals level looking and what’s possible. We are a sector desperately in need of disruption to accelerate the generation of knowledge and lower the costs of developing new treatments for patients today. We need to ask what are the best ways to generate actionable evidence that can benefit patients, clinicians, payers and regulators. We need to take an integrated approach to biology and treatment discovery. Large-scale approaches like genetics, the biome, metabolomics, and proteomics are coming down in price faster than the famous Moors law that has driven computer improvements. These tools are beginning to allow us to understand the biological variation that makes up each of us. This is the technology I used at ALS TDI; the organization I founded, to help learn about the early changes in ALS. This emerging technology needs to be met with well-measured human outcomes. PatientsLikeMe is working to build that network. Our goal is to be a virtual global registry with millions of individuals sharing health information, translated into every language and normalized to local traditions fully …

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March is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide, and in the United States alone, about 200 new people are diagnosed each week. Those are just a couple of the many reasons why the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America (MSAA) recognizes March as Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month. What more do we know about MS? Doctors are unsure of the root cause of the condition, but women are twice as likely as men to develop MS. Additionally, the farther away from the equator you live, the greater likelihood you’ll experience MS – overall, your lifetime chance of developing MS is about 1 in 1,000.1 Did you know that there are four different types of MS? Each one affects people a little differently. Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) affects the large majority (85 percent) of MS patients, and this type features clearly defined periods when symptoms get worse and activity decreases. Primary-progressive MS (PPMS) causes a clear progression of symptoms and equally affects men and women. Secondary-progressive (SPMS) is a form of PPMS which is initially diagnosed in only about 10 percent of patients. Progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS) is found in only 5 percent of MS patients, but these people have both clear relapses …

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Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – brain fog

Australian Jessica Anderson has been living with multiple sclerosis since she was 12 years old, and she says brain fog is the scariest symptom she experiences, especially not being able to gather and make sense of her own thoughts. During her worst moments, she can barely focus on a thought for more than 30 seconds. Listen to Jessica speak about her symptoms below.   You are now seeing brain fog Photographed by Sara Orme Inspired by Jessica Anderson’s invisible symptoms Jessica and New Zealand photographer Sara Orme worked together to visualize Jessica’s brain fog, and her video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

PatientsLikeMe Attends 4th Annual ALS TDI White Coat Affair

Back in November, a whole group from the PatientsLikeMe team came together for a great cause and attended the 4th annual A White Coat Affair gala benefiting the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI). ALS TDI, founded by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood in 1999, is the number one nonprofit biotechnology organization dedicated to developing effective treatments for ALS. All proceeds from the event directly fund the research being conducted at ALS TDI. The charity gala was held right after ALS TDI’s 10th Annual Leadership Summit, which featured in-depth scientific presentations from researchers and “thought leaders” on scientific developments, the PALS’ perspective and advice from pharma and biotech leaders within the ALS community. For the past 10 years, the Leadership Summit has brought together members of the ALS community for an intimate gathering to connect on the state of ALS research and progress being made toward a treatment. The PatientsLikeMe team and other attendees traveled to the Westin Copley Place Hotel in Boston for A White Coat Affair and a special evening complete with a cocktail hour, dinner and live music. While there were some lighthearted moments (such as a cocktail called the Mad Scientist) there were also some …

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“The human spirit is more resilient than we think” – PatientsLikeMe member mmsan66 shares her journey with ALS

PatientsLikeMe member mmsan66 was diagnosed with ALS back in 2008, but she’s been fortunate to experience an unusually slow progression, which currently affects only her legs. As a college professor, financial planner and ALS advocate, she raises awareness through her work with the Massachusetts Chapter of the ALS Association. She even finds time to visit places like the Grand Canyon, and she shared all about her life in a PatientsLikeMe interview. Read below to learn about her personal journey.  What was your diagnosis experience like? What were some of your initial symptoms? I was diagnosed in 2008 at the age of 66 but, looking back, had definitely exhibited symptoms in 2007 or earlier. I had retired a few years prior, after a long career in Human Resource Management that included positions in the fields of health care, the Federal government, higher education (Northeastern University), and high technology (the former Digital Equipment Corporation).  But, rather than slow down and enjoy retirement, I started a second career in tax and financial planning. I became an IRS Enrolled Agent (EA), earned a Certificate in Financial Planning, and obtained my securities and insurance licenses.  I started my own business as a tax and financial …

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PatientsLikeMe member Tam builds first-ever ‘by patients, for patients’ health measure on the Open Research Exchange

Back in March last year, we shared on the blog about a new grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that would help support two patient-led projects on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) , a platform that brings patients and researchers together to develop the most effective tools for measuring disease. We were overwhelmed by the response from the community, and we’re excited to share that one of those projects is very close to being completed. Tam is living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and she’s been a PatientsLikeMe member for more than 4 years. After her diagnosis and experiences with her doctors not “getting” what pain means to her, Tam decided to create a new tool for anyone who might be experiencing chronic pain. Her idea is to build a measure that can help doctors better understand and communicate with patients about pain. Watch her video above to learn about her journey and listen to her explain her inspiration behind the new ORE project. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS and chronic pain.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – fatigue

“It’s like I’m deflated. I don’t feel like doing anything.” That’s how Darcy McCann says he feels on most days. He’s a young Australian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis [MS] at the age of 10, and his most debilitating symptom is fatigue, which comes and goes as a result of his nerves being constantly under siege.   You are now seeing fatigue Photographed by Juliet Taylor Inspired by Darcy McCann’s invisible symptoms Darcy worked with award-winning photographer Juliet Taylor to capture how he feels when enduring bouts of fatigue. His video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

The Patient Voice- MS member Jackie shares her story

  When Jackie was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis after a long, exhausting process, she struggled with a fear of the unknown and had no idea what she would be facing. But then she connected with the thousands of MS members on PatientsLikeMe. Jackie shared with the community about how she felt her current medication was making matters worse instead of better, and others responded with how they had the same experience. They told her about a new medication that seemed to be working for some of them. Jackie’s doctor prescribed it after she mentioned what others had shared, and she’s been having good luck with it ever since. Watch the video to see more of her journey.     Share this post on Twitter and help spread #dataforgood. And don’t forget to check out previous #dataforgood member videos.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – dizziness

Lyn Petruccelli is living with multiple sclerosis, and she fights random waves of vertigo and dizziness that can strike her at any moment. Sometimes, the feelings are so strong, she can’t even get out of bed. As Lyn says, “I can’t see it coming, and that makes it hard to fight.”1   You are now seeing dizziness Photographed by Louis Petruccelli Inspired by Lyn Petruccelli’s invisible symptoms Lyn’s husband Louis is an accomplished photographer, and they worked together to visually portray what it’s like to live with the possibility of dizziness every day. Their photograph is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS. 1 http://www.seeingms.com.au/ms-stories

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