14 posts tagged “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”

PTSD Nightmares: Why they’re happening and what you can do

Posted 10 months ago by

More than 1,600 members of the PTSD community on have reported experiencing severe nightmares, and there are dozens of forum threads tagged with topic. So, we took a deeper dive into PTSD nightmares and some of the research-backed approaches you can try to help manage them.

PTSD nightmares

How common are nightmares after trauma?

The quick answer: Very common.

  • According to one study, 71% to 96% of people with PTSD experience nightmares. And the number is even higher for those also living with another mental health condition like panic disorder.
  • At least 50% of people with PTSD suffer from nightmares that incorporate elements or contain exact replications of a traumatic event (these are called replicative nightmares).
  • An additional 20-25% experience post-traumatic nightmares that don’t exactly replay the trauma memory, but are symbolically related to the traumatic event.

Why do PTSD nightmares happen?

Scientists have been studying dreams for years, but they still don’t fully understand how or why we dream.

Matthew Walker, a psychology researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, has one theory. Walker found that during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the chemistry of the brain actually changes. Levels of norepinephrine — a kind of adrenaline — drop out completely. REM sleep is the only time of day when this happens. In people not living with PTSD, REM sleep is kind of like therapy; it’s an adrenaline-free environment where the brain can process its memories while stripping away the emotional edges.

Walker’s theory suggests that in people with PTSD, REM sleep is broken. The adrenaline doesn’t go away like it’s supposed to. The brain can’t process tough memories, so it just cycles through them, again and again. This theory is being put to the test: The VA is currently running several clinical trials on prazosin, a drug that lowers sensitivity to adrenaline. Check out this page to see if there’s a trial in your area.

Treatments for PTSD nightmares

  • Imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT) – This approach helps people change how their nightmare ends by reimagining it while they are awake. The idea is that by changing the storyline of the dream to something not scary, your nightmare becomes less upsetting and occurs less often.
  • Prazosin – Mentioned above, prazosin is currently in clinical trials to evaluate its effectiveness for treating PTSD nightmares. In the few trials that have been conducted, results have been positive. In one 15- week study involving 67 active duty soldiers with PTSD, prazosin was found to improve trauma-related nightmares and sleep quality and reduce PTSD symptoms. See what PatientsLikeMe members have said about taking prazosin for nightmares.

Here are 5 common treatments members of the PatientsLikeMe PTSD community have tried in order to manage insomnia :

Interested in finding out more about what other people living with PTSD are trying in order to manage their condition? Join PatientsLikeMe and become part of a community of others like you.

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Highlighting the many faces of PTSD

Posted June 27th, 2017 by

The many faces of PTSD

 

PTSD doesn’t have just one face, it has millions.  During any given year, there are about eight million adults who have PTSD, which is why for PTSD Awareness Day this year, we’re sharing just some of those many faces and the stories behind them. From grandmothers to soldiers, both women and men, the PatientsLikeMe PTSD community is made up of people from all backgrounds – connecting through their shared experiences. Read their stories and log in to connect with others in the forum.

 

Survivinglife: “I felt like a million pounds had been lifted from my shoulders. The course of my life finally made sense. My lack of being able to trust people, my lack of friendships, the ‘moodiness,’ that are really reactions to triggers that I know, and some that I am continuing to figure out. Why I always felt different, like I didn’t fit in, why I still feel that way today.” Read More

 

 

DSwartz: “Always know that you are NOT ALONE… PTSD comes from trying to be too strong for too long or on your own, with little or no support. Talking about your fears and insecurities with someone who truly listens and does not judge you makes a huge difference. You can learn to accept your fears, work through them and enjoy life again.” Read More

 

 

ChrisBC: “The most challenging aspect of my diagnosis is being in touch with my feelings. I would tend to block out my feelings and hide them deep inside and put on a false persona because I was scared. I still struggle with this today and have so much support helping me to make it through this.” Read More

 

 

SuperChick: “I still experience triggers, but am able to process the emotions using cognitive behavioral therapy skills and journaling. When I am triggered, I make sure I take care of myself through prayer, talking with my husband and therapist, and doing things that help me relax, ground me, and fully engage my mind, like playing my flute and piano.” Read More

 

 

Jeffperry1134: “My PTSD was early onset after returning from Desert Storm… At the time I was a 19-year-old alone in Germany away from my family struggling with this mental illness. My supervisors were able to help me hide my problems well and it was not discovered at that time. I feared being singled out for having these problems.” Read More

 

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