3 posts tagged “photos”

“I just kind of went on with life.” – PatientsLikeMe member Fred shares his experiences with MS

Posted November 19th, 2014 by

We’ve interviewed a lot of members on the blog over the years, and each has a different perspective on life with MS. Fred1118 has taken sharing about his life with MS to a whole new level, documenting his life in a personal photoblog and posting the pictures with the world online. Fred shared all about his experiences in a recent interview, everything from his handicap-accessible house to how physical therapy helps him stay mobile. Read his story below.

What went through your mind when you were diagnosed with RRMS back in 1994?

I didn’t really know too much about MS at the time. I’m not sure if I had even heard of it, so didn’t know what to think. The diagnosing neurologist said, “you have a mild case of MS.” I was young and carefree at the time and didn’t really worry about it too much. I kind of just went on with life.

It looks like you’ve done a lot of work on your house to make it handicap accessible. What are some tips and tricks you can share with the community?

I would say that everyone’s needs are different. It’s a good idea to have an occupational therapist that is experienced in doing home safety and accessibility evaluations come work with you in your home to see what your abilities and limitations are so he or she can make proper recommendations. I advise that people not wait until modifications are absolutely necessary before making them. I’ve been guilty of that in many regards, including waiting too long to get a power wheelchair. I should have gotten one sooner. It would have expanded my ability to go places and do things.

We saw some pictures on your photoblog of you in physical therapy – is that a daily routine? How does it help you manage your symptoms?

I was getting in home PT 3 days a week for a few months after suffering a seizure that prevented me from driving for several months. The PT is of course not a cure for MS, but it does provide exercises and strength training options that can help you maintain some abilities. When you’re sitting in a wheelchair all day, I think you can lose some function not just from the MS, but also from being sedentary, so it’s important to exercise.

Can you tell us about your daily meal set-up? 

I have a pretty simple daily meal routine. I often eat the same things day after day. For breakfast I eat some yogurt, a multigrain type bar and a banana. That rarely changes. Lunch is almost always a sandwich (some kind of meat and cheese along with some mayo) and a piece of fruit, maybe an apple, pear or peach. Dinner varies a little. A friend who lives here with me often makes a pretty bountiful garden salad that includes lettuce, spinach, beets, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower and more. Sounds good huh! In addition I’ll eat something else like canned soup, a bowl of cereal, maybe a pre-made Indian dinner that I like. Almost all meals are eaten on my wheelchair tray.

Your photoblog takes viewers through a day in your life – what inspired you to give back to others and raise awareness for MS?

I’ve been a long time volunteer with both the National MS Society and the Myelin Repair Foundation. I had never really done much volunteer work prior to my MS diagnosis. After I stopped working full time I didn’t really do much of anything productive with my time. It was actually a girlfriend who suggested contacting the MS Society to see if they had volunteer work I could do. They did, and I caught the volunteerism bug. I would recommend it to anyone. I often say that doing volunteer work is as beneficial and rewarding to the volunteer as it hopefully is to the people you’re volunteering to help.

Not everyone is as open about their personal experiences living with MS as you. What was it like working with the photographer and putting yourself out there?

I guess I’m kind of an open guy. After meeting Ted (the photographer) I felt comfortable with him and trusted him. I decided pretty much right away that I was going to be all in on this project. I figured if you’re going to do something, do it right. We hoped to have an impact with the photo essay, and only being half in so to speak wouldn’t do the job. I didn’t really do anything other than let someone take pictures of me doing things I normally do. I know Ted was amazed at how open I was. I didn’t really feel like I was doing anything all that amazing.

Photos courtesy of TGoldmanPhotography.com

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PatientsLikeMe at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

Posted November 28th, 2012 by

On Friday, November 2nd, several PatientsLikeMe team members donned their finest to attend the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, a charity gala benefiting the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI).  Founded by PatientsLikeMe Co-Founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood in 1999, ALS TDI is the world’s most advanced research laboratory dedicated to ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The PatientsLikeMe Team Along with ALS Patient Steve Saling (Front) at the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair for ALS TDI

This gala fundraiser was held in conjunction with ALS TDI’s 8th Annual Leadership Summit, which included in-depth scientific presentations by top ALS researchers, a discussion panel with industry leaders and an awards ceremony honoring individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to ALS research and advocacy.  (View the summit webcast here.)  PatientsLikeMe was a proud sponsor of this annual gathering of the most influential minds in the ALS community.  In particular, we were honored to witness the posthumous awarding of the Stephen Heywood Patients Today Award – given annually to an individual who exemplifies what it means to be an educator, role model and advocate – to beloved PatientsLikeMe member Persevering (Rob Tison).

Keeping with the Laboratory Theme, The Name Cards Were Inspired by the Periodic Table of Elements

Held at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston the next night, A White Coat Affair was an opportunity for summit attendees to unwind and socialize via cocktails, a dinner program, live music and dancing.  In honor of the theme, servers wore white lab coats, name cards were labeled like the periodic table and vases were filled with brightly colored liquid to resemble lab tubes.  A special highlight of the dinner program this year was the Young Perspectives on ALS segment, which featured the stories of two young people living with ALS (Corey Reich and Pete Frates) as well as four young people who are the children of ALS patients (Katie Shambo, Sam Ketchum, Jenn Sutherland and Alex Heywood).

As you might have guessed, Alex Heywood is the son of Stephen Heywood and nephew of PatientsLikeMe Co-Founders Jamie Heywood and Ben Heywood.  Both ALS TDI and PatientsLikeMe were inspired by Stephen’s seven-year battle with ALS, a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with an average life expectancy of two to five years following diagnosis.

Young ALS Patients and the Sons and Daughters of ALS Patients Were the Focus of This Year's Dinner Program

Approximately 350 guests attended A White Coat Affair, helping to raise $450,000 towards ALS TDI’s efforts to discover and develop effective treatments for ALS. After a decade of progress, the institute is entering a time of great promise, with several therapies in clinical trials and their own work on Gilenya (a drug currently approved for treating multiple sclerosis) and other potential therapeutics moving into the clinical realm.  Learn more about ALS TDI’s current research projects here.

To see more photos from the 2nd Annual White Coat Affair, visit the event’s Facebook page.