photography

The ALS battle forces changes: A guest blog by member Jim Burton, the ALS Warrior

A harsh reality of progressive diseases like ALS is that your body is constantly changing. After my ALS diagnosis in January 2013, I noticed that the progression seemed to happen in stages. After losing some degree of capacity, I’d settle on a new plateau, which became my norm for a while. The plateaus have become shorter, and the declines have become more pronounced. Neurologists call ALS a progressive disease, but to my family and me it’s digressive as my health declines. In turn, the digression forces change as today I can’t do what I did yesterday. The biggest changes happened early on as I lost the ability to walk and began using a motorized wheelchair. As dramatic as the change appeared when I became a de facto paraplegic, the new plateau felt manageable. With a handicap-equipped van and hand controls for driving, I maintained most of my independence. For several years after the diagnosis, I worked as a freelance journalist not only writing stories, which I could do from my home, but also going on location for the photographs. In one week, I traveled alone about 900 miles throughout Georgia and stayed in several hotels. Two years later, I had …

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Worth a thousand words: A day in the life of Larry

As a child, Sarah Howell loved art. She got her first camera at 6 years old and realized, over time, that she had a way of connecting emotionally and expressing herself through photos. Now, she has her own studio. Her passion? Capturing genuine family moments. Sarah often stays overnight in the home of the family so she can spend the entire next day with them, from start to finish. A day in the life of Larry Tyler When Sarah’s friend, Teri, asked her to capture a day in the life of her father, Larry Tyler, she was both shocked and honored. Larry, living with ALS that required 24-hour care, wanted the photos released to raise awareness and funding for ALS. Sarah was there with her camera, from Larry’s wake-up at 10:30am, until he went to bed that evening. What emerged was a series of 24 deeply moving photos that capture a day in the life of Larry and his family. While she was prepared for sad moments with the family, she wasn’t prepared for the level of caregiver exhaustion she witnessed. For Sarah, the realization that ALS is a family disease was the hardest part of her visit.   Despite …

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Visualizing insomnia

Jenna Martin is a photographer living with insomnia, and her sleeplessness is the inspiration behind much of her work. Much like the Seeing [MS] campaign, she tries to visualize her experiences through unique photographs that capture what it feels like to manage bouts of insomnia. Her photographs were recently featured in the Huffington Post, and as she told the organization, “on average, I only get a few hours of sleep every three days or so. During a bad bout, I’ll go close to five days with no sleep. When that happens, reality and the dream world become switched in a way: reality is very hazy and hard to remember, and any sleep I do get has dreams that are incredibly vivid. Everything starts to blend together; I’ll begin seeing things from a third person perspective and it’s hard to tell if I’m awake or if I’m dreaming.” Check out some of her pictures below, and see more of her work on her Facebook page. If you are living with insomnia, you’re not alone – over 2,200 people on PatientsLikeMe know what you’re going through. You can also visit the Sleep Issues forum to ask questions and learn more about sleep …

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“I just kind of went on with life.” – PatientsLikeMe member Fred shares his experiences with MS

We’ve interviewed a lot of members on the blog over the years, and each has a different perspective on life with MS. Fred1118 has taken sharing about his life with MS to a whole new level, documenting his life in a personal photoblog and posting the pictures with the world online. Fred shared all about his experiences in a recent interview, everything from his handicap-accessible house to how physical therapy helps him stay mobile. Read his story below. What went through your mind when you were diagnosed with RRMS back in 1994? I didn’t really know too much about MS at the time. I’m not sure if I had even heard of it, so didn’t know what to think. The diagnosing neurologist said, “you have a mild case of MS.” I was young and carefree at the time and didn’t really worry about it too much. I kind of just went on with life. It looks like you’ve done a lot of work on your house to make it handicap accessible. What are some tips and tricks you can share with the community? I would say that everyone’s needs are different. It’s a good idea to have an occupational therapist that …

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