15 posts tagged “patient reported outcomes”

PatientsLikeMe invites patients to lead research projects on Open Research Exchange

Posted March 29th, 2014 by

New $2.4 Million Grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Supports Two Patient-Led Projects in 2014 to Develop, Test and Validate Patient-Reported Outcomes

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—March 27, 2014—Expanding on its mission to put patients at the center of clinical research, PatientsLikeMe today announced that patients can now apply to lead the development of new health outcome measurements using the company’s Open Research Exchange™ (ORE) platform. This call for participation is a way for people living with disease to become the researcher, and to use their own and others’ experiences to create new health measures that are more meaningful, helpful, and relevant.

ORE was launched in 2013 as an online hub for the development of patient-reported outcomes (PROs)—measures used by clinicians to gauge health, disease severity, and quality of life. Since then, thousands of PatientsLikeMe members have given researchers feedback on measures relating to hypertension, treatment burden, diabetes and appetite, and primary palliative care. There were six pilot studies fielded on ORE last year and, while response goals varied from study to study, on average researchers using ORE collected 100 percent of their required responses in less than a week’s time. PatientsLikeMe’s Vice President of Innovation Paul Wicks said that’s far faster than the average 6-12 months it can take to gather similar data via in-person meetings or telephone and web-based questionnaires.

“We’re only beginning to see how ORE can simplify and speed up the research process, and how our members’ experience with more than 2,000 conditions can help researchers more clearly hear the patient voice,” Wicks said. “Now, we’ll be able to work alongside patients as they shape the next generation of research tools and lead future advancements in the research process.”

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), whose 2013 grant of $1.9 million funded the platform’s start, will accelerate ORE’s innovative approach to developing measures with an additional $2.4 million grant.

“We are eager to invest in innovation that explores how to put patients more firmly in the driver’s seat of their care and of discovery in medicine,” said RWJF Senior Program Officer Paul Tarini. “We’re excited to see the potential impact that patients can have in clinical care and research with ORE’s new phase.”

Patients who want to ensure research goes in a direction that addresses their needs and concerns and who have an idea for a new measure are invited to apply at https://www.openresearchexchange.com/patients.

About PatientsLikeMe

PatientsLikeMe® (www.patientslikeme.com) is a patient network that improves lives and a real-time research platform that advances medicine. Through the network, patients connect with others who have the same disease or condition and track and share their own experiences. In the process, they generate data about the real-world nature of disease that help researchers, pharmaceutical companies, regulators, providers, and nonprofits develop more effective products, services and care. With more than 250,000 members, PatientsLikeMe is a trusted source for real-world disease information and a clinically robust resource that has published more than 40 peer-reviewed research studies. Visit us at www.patientslikeme.com or follow us via our blog, Twitter or Facebook. 

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve the health and health care of all Americans. We are striving to build a national culture of health that will enable all Americans to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at www.rwjf.org/facebook.


Subjects no more: what happens when trial participants realize they hold the power in clinical trials?

Posted February 18th, 2014 by

When I first became involved with online communities back in 2002, I moderated a small forum for patients with ALS/MND in the UK at King’s College Hospital to connect with one another, share tips and support, and to help our care center to serve them better. One area that remains controversial even to this day is clinical trials. ALS is a rapidly fatal and incurable illness, and as a young researcher I was often trying to field questions that patients had about the trials process:

“Why aren’t there more trials taking place?”

“Why do we have to have a placebo?”

“If researchers think commonly available treatments like dietary supplements or antibiotics might slow my disease, why can’t I just take them anyway rather than being enrolled in a trial?”

Given the severity of their situation and the slow pace of clinical trials (it’s estimated that it takes over 10 years for a new discovery to go from the lab to the clinic), I certainly sympathized with their frustrations and did my best to get the answers they needed, asking my medical colleagues where I could and translating the technical jargon. A few patients decided to go a step further than challenging the status quo, however, and took actions into their own hands. One patient taking part in a trial sent her medication off to a private lab to test whether or not she was on placebo, and several others took off-label experimental ALS treatments like creatine or minocycline. Some of them even went abroad to China for highly controversial stem cell treatments. In the end, none of these interventions were shown to slow the disease, but it certainly showed what was possible when a smart, dedicated, and adventurous group of patients could organize online.

Fast-forward more than ten years and we see a very different world, where patients have a growing voice in treatment approval, the design of patient reported outcome measures, and increasingly share their trial experiences through social media. That’s what inspired us to write our latest article just published in the British Medical Journal which details our experiences with how members of our community have replicated a clinical trial, have started sharing their data with leading researchers to debunk alternative “cures” for their disease, and have even started taking trials into their own hands. We feel these are symptoms of a greater underlying problem that has been with the design of clinical trials from the start – trials are all take and no give.

Patients take all the risk with their health, their time, their bodies, and in return they are supposed to temporarily suspend their instinctual curiosity to know more about their health status through self-monitoring or to interact with other patients who might be in a trial, all for the good of science and other patients. Modern technology up-ends that power dynamic though, and now it’s almost as easy for a patient to measure their health status with patient-reported outcomes, wearable devices, or even lab tests as it is for their doctor. In that case, can we really say patients are truly blinded anymore? The double-blind placebo-controlled randomized controlled trial is a “gold standard” in medicine, but unless it adapts to the changing realities of the patient empowerment landscape, it will be inherently unsustainable.

That’s why our team is embarking on research this year to gain a new understanding of what patients want from trials and a new understanding of the social contract as patients want it written. Our hope is that we can bring them together with the scientific needs of researchers to conduct robust science. It won’t be easy, and it might not be popular with everyone, but it’s the best path we can see towards faster cures that respects the rights of patients to be partners, not just subjects.

PatientsLikeMe member PaulWicks