4 posts tagged “patient evaluations”

CyberKnife, VATS + other surgical and less invasive treatments for lung cancer

Posted 5 months ago by

Surgery is among the most common treatments for people with lung cancer. Let’s take a closer look at various types of surgery for lung cancer, as well as emerging non-surgical and minimally invasive treatments, like CyberKnife or “SBRT,” cryosurgery and “VATS.” Huh? Read on… we’ll explain.

Common types of lung cancer surgery

Before we explore some of the newer and less invasive treatments, let’s review the most common surgical treatments for lung cancer these days. These are the most frequently reported treatments on PatientsLikeMe (to access the links below, join the community or login):

  • Lung lobectomy – In this procedure, a surgeon removes the entire lobe of the lung that contains a tumor. The right lung has 3 lobes, and the left lung has 2 lobes. See members’ evaluations of this treatment here.
  • Lung wedge resection – This procedure involves removing a small, wedge-shaped portion of the lung (containing cancer), along with a certain amount of healthy tissue that surrounds the area. See treatment evaluations here.
  • Pneumonectomy – Also called “radical pneumonectomy,” this means surgically removing an entire lung. Read treatment reports here.
  • Lung segment resection – This procedure usually removes more than a wedge resection would but not the entire lobe of the lung. See treatment reports here.

Check out additional treatment evaluations for other specific treatments such as bronchial sleeve lobectomy and lobectomies by location in the body (see the “See also”section for details on upper, middle, lower, left and right lung lobectomies). Also, see forum discussions about lung cancer surgery and tips for recovering from surgery.

VATS, CyberKnife and cryosurgery

Now, let’s explore some of the newer and lesser-known or less invasive treatments. Keep in mind, not everyone is a candidate for these procedures (Cleveland Clinic outlines some reasons why — such as extensive spreading of cancer or prior chemotherapy treatment), so talk with your physician(s) and consider seeking a second opinion to find the treatments that will work best for you.

  • VATS – This stands for “video-assisted thorascopic surgery,” and some forms of it may also be “robotic-assisted.” Most lung cancer surgeries involve a thoracotomy (usually a 10-inch surgical incision). But VATS is like a laparoscopy for the lungs — a minimally invasive procedure where the surgeon uses tiny instruments and a fiber-optic video camera threaded through multiple half-inch incisions, rather than one large incision. Surgeons are increasingly using VATS whenever possible, but rarely for pneumonectomy or some types of resections that require a larger incision, Everyday Health reports.
  • Cryosurgery – This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope through the trachea and into the lungs, and then using a probe to freeze tumor tissue and remove it. Patients with very advanced disease or poor lung function may be a candidate for this, if doctors determine they’re not a good fit for surgery.
  • CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery, or “SBRT” – Contrary to the sounds of something with “knife” and “surgery” in the name, CyberKnife treatment is not actually surgery. This is a type of radiation therapy that may be an alternative to surgery. The general name for this procedure is stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), and CyberKnife is a brand name of the technology that may be used (see this video for some more info).
  • During SBRT or CyberKnife treatment, highly focused beams to deliver radiation to a pinpointed area, with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. A few PatientsLikeMe members have evaluated this treatment and discussed it in the forum. Some researchers say that SBRT is “a well-established treatment option for early stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors < 5 cm.”

One member with adenocarcinoma says she had five treatment sessions with SBRT. “The five treatments were given on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and on Monday, Wednesday of the following week. I had absolutely no problems with the radiation. The only minor problem was laying in a form that was molded to your body with your arms extended above your head for about 45 minutes.”

Have you had any of these procedures or do you have any questions about upcoming treatments? Join PatientsLikeMe to connect with and learn from other patients with lung cancer.

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Cannabidiol (CBD) oil and product FAQs: Fad or effective? Legal or not?

Posted 5 months ago by

Trending: Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, gummies, tinctures and more. Why are cannabis products gaining popularity as medical treatments and in general? As more states have legalized medical marijuana, more people have shifted their views on cannabis treatments (like former Speaker of the House John Boehner’s recent change of heart). And last month, an advisory panel at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) unanimously recommended a medication made from CBD for some forms of epilepsy.

CBD comes from cannabis/marijuana but has some key differences. So, let’s take a closer look at CBD products and some FAQs, like, do they work and are they legal?

What is CBD?

Short answer: Cannabidiol (pronounced canna-bid-EYE-ol) or CBD is a chemical found in cannabis plants that does not produce a “high.”

More info: Cannabis plants can produce more than 100 different types of cannabinoids, a type of chemical that reacts with receptors in the brain. The two most common cannabinoids found in medical marijuana are THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). THC is responsible for producing the mental and physical effects of medical marijuana. CBD has many of the same therapeutic qualities as THC, but without psychoactive effects. (For even more info, read our report called “Weed 101: How and why patients use medical marijuana.”)

Products made purely from CBD (without THC) do not produce the psychoactive high of other medical marijuana or some CBD/THC combination products. But, as a JAMA report and some in the medical cannabis industry have pointed out, many CBD products sold online are not accurately labeled (containing much more or less CBD than the label claims, or even containing some THC when it’s not mentioned on the label).

CBD is not regulated or approved by the FDA — but they have issued warning letters to some CBD producers with misleading labels.

Many doctors (in the U.S. and internationally) are hesitant to recommend smoking cannabis or inhaling any burned plant material but may be more open to CBD products that are not smoked. (Has your doctor or provider weighed in about medical cannabis or CBD products? Make a comment below.BD products can be pretty expensive so search around for things like discounted CBD vape juice. You’ll find some great deals! I often buy my wholesale vape supplies online or in a store near me.

Are CBD products effective?

On PatientsLikeMe, members have reported trying CBD for about 160 different reasons, including specific conditions (ALS, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and fibromyalgia — to name a few) and symptoms (from anxious or depressed mood to stiffness/spasticity). Below is a list of CBD or cannabis products members have reported as treatments on the site — remember to discuss your treatments with your healthcare provider, and keep in mind that treatment responses vary:

Join PatientsLikeMe to see more details through the links above and to connect with other members about their treatment experiences.

Note: CBD industry insiders advise avoiding splashy websites that offer a “free trial” of the product — by filling out a form, you may be signing up for an unwanted subscription.

Is CBD legal?

Short answer: CBD is legal under some state laws but not under federal law — so it’s pretty confusing (even to healthcare providers).

More info: As of May 2018, there are 17 states with laws specifically about legal CBD. Most state laws allowing some CBD use tend to be very specific (for example, limiting a CBD product’s THC content) and are not the same as state medical marijuana laws.

Under federal law, cannabis products (including CBD) are illegal and classified the same as marijuana (and heroin and ecstasy) as a Schedule I controlled substance. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) made headlines in Indiana (where some CBD is legal) a few months back when DEA spokesman Rusty Payne told the local news that CBD is illegal under federal law, but is not the DEA’s main focus. “We are in the middle of an opioid crisis in this country,” Payne said. “That’s our biggest priority right now. People are not dying from CBD. Some would argue lives are being saved by CBD. Are we going to get in the middle of that? Probably not.”

Last year, U.S. Rep. Morgan Griffith introduced a bill called the “Compassionate Access Act” to encourage the federal government to remove marijuana from “Schedule I” classification, exclude CBD from the definition of marijuana in order to allow better medical access, and regulate CBD products to ensure they’re low in THC. So far, the bill has only bounced around to various congressional subcommittees.

Have any questions, comments or feedback on CBD products? Make a comment below or — even better — become a PatientsLikeMe member to discuss this topic in the forum and see more treatment evaluations from people living with your condition.

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