6 posts tagged “patient community”

Fundraising for a health-related charity walk/run? Get sponsored by PatientsLikeMe!

Posted September 21st, 2018 by

Looking for ideas for raising more money for an upcoming cancer walk, MS bike ride, or other health-related charity event where you’ll be hitting the streets? Learn more about PatientsLikeMeInMotion! It’s a program that sponsors you and your team as you walk, run, cycle (etc.) with a nonprofit organization to raise funds and awareness for your disease or health condition (psst—PatientsLikeMe gear included). Read on!

PatientsLikeMeInMotion has grown a lot since we launched it back in 2009! Members have raised funds for cancer, multiple sclerosis, ALS, epilepsy, kidney disease, psoriasis, mental health and more (just take a peek at our Pinterest board).

In 2017, 89 members and their teams (with a total of nearly 2,000 participants) raised awareness and over $14,000 for their diseases.

In the first half of 2018, 73 members from 24 states and their teams have already participated and raised more than $18,000.

Interested in sponsorship by PatientsLikeMe? Here’s how to apply:

  1. Join PatientsLikeMe (membership is free)!
  2. Make sure your profile is up-to-date.
  3. Submit a request with your team and event details, including your preference of spiffy T-shirts or PatientsLikeMe hats (like the one above). We’ll confirm the details and you’ll be on your way. (See the full guidelines here to learn more.)

Past participants, inspire others. If you’ve been a part of PatientsLikeMeInMotion, feel free to post a picture in the forum (and on social media along with the tag #MembersInMotion)!

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.


What’s in your “chemo bag”? Gearing up for lung cancer treatment

Posted May 18th, 2018 by

Chemotherapy is one of the most common treatments for lung cancer, so the community on PatientsLikeMe is chatting about what’s helpful to pack in a bag for chemo appointments (join PatientsLikeMe to take part in this lung cancer forum discussion).

Everyone’s experiences, side effects and preferences are different, but here are some items that people who’ve had chemotherapy say they’ve brought with them:

  • Sweatshirt and other comfy layers, in case it’s cold in the clinic (tip: a v-neck shirt and a hoodie with a zipper can offer easier access, if you have a central line or port
  • Fuzzy socks and/or close-toed shoes
  • A favorite blanket and pillow from home — although the clinic probably has these on hand, it can be nice to have your own
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste, in case you get a bad taste in your mouth (sometimes called “metal mouth”)
  • Anti-nausea aids, like ginger candy or “pregnancy lollipops”
  • Bottled water or whatever you like to drink (some people say iced green tea settles their stomach) — to help you stay hydrated and prevent dry mouth
  • Hard candy to suck on (fruity, minty or whatever you like)
  • Snacks to graze on (some clinics provide snacks, while others just provide water and coffee)… food is fine, as long as your care team hasn’t told you to fast for some reason, such as a CT scan
  • Lip balm to prevent chapped lips and mouth sores
  • Laptop, tablet or other mobile device, complete with earbuds and some entertainment (shows, movies, music, apps, or podcasts) downloaded in advance, just in case there’s not a good Wi-Fi connection available
  • A book or magazine (some people don’t feel well while looking at screens, so it’s nice to have printed copies on hand)
  • Adult coloring books and colored pencils for relaxation/entertainment
  • A journal, to help you write out some of your feelings (bonus tip: Michigan Medicine offers free guided-imagery/meditation MP3s to help people manage the emotions that come with cancer treatment)
  • A close friend or family member — someone you feel very comfortable with (and who can drive you when you’re tired after your treatments)

Learn more from these resources:

Have any ideas to add? Or just getting started with treatment? Become a member to connect with 9,000+ people with lung cancer and talk about topics like this.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word.