4 posts tagged “music”

Could the Rolling Stones be part of Parkinson’s disease management? (Check out Pamela Quinn’s blog)

Posted April 26th, 2017 by

It’s Parkinson’s Awareness Month, and we’re continuing to find meaningful stories in the world of PD. Did you tune into our recent podcast featuring Pamela Quinn – a professional dancer who’s living with Parkinson’s? She teaches dance classes in New York City for people with PD. Now, she’s taking her dance and movement tips to a broader audience online in a cool new blog (psst – Rolling Stones fans, read on…)!

Pamela Quinn Parkinson's

Some members have noted in the PatientsLikeMe PD forum that they’ve attended and benefited from dance classes for people with PD (even ones that reference Pam’s teachings!). But what if you have PD and live where classes like this aren’t available – or if dance classes just aren’t up your alley? Check out Pam’s blog, PD Movement Lab.

Songs to step to

Pam uses visuals, like photos and videos, in a series of mini-lessons for moving and walking with PD. In one of her first posts, she shows how walking to music can improve Parkinson‘s gait, and offers a playlist of her favorite songs to walk to at varying tempos, including:

  • “Fever,” Peggy Lee (68 beats per minute)
  • “Clarinet Concerto in A Major,” Mozart (94 bpm)
  • “Moon Rocks,” Talking Heads (124 bpm)
  • “Brown Sugar,” Rolling Stones (129 bpm)

(Hint: You can find out the tempo of your own favorite songs using this neat BPM calculator, and then create your own playlist.)

“We can put it back together”

Pam’s blog is all about empowering people with PD to keep moving, although she knows first-hand that it’s not easy (she has lived with PD for more than 20 years).

Dancing for Parkinson's

“Why are we breaking a walk down into all these bits and pieces?” she says in her latest blog post (about arm swing – featuring Judy Garland). “It’s because with Parkinson’s, we lose the ability to move unconsciously. But if we understand how things work, we can put it back together. It may require a conscious effort but at least we have the opportunity to move with coordination, fluidity, skill and awareness.”

Do you have any tips for moving or walking with PD, or favorite songs that keep you moving? Make a comment below!

On PatientsLikeMe, dozens of patients have reported trying various forms of dance to help manage their condition. Take a look.

A note from Pam: The content of this post is intended to provide experiential advice from a fellow patient about ways of moving to help manage your PD. It is in no way intended as a substitute for medical consultation. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider before engaging in any new exercise program. Pamela Quinn or PD Movement Lab will not be responsible for any injury or harm you sustain in performing any exercises or following any advice presented here in. 

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“I feel it needs to be told”: Member Cathy shares a memory

Posted February 21st, 2017 by

Last year, we spoke with Cathy (Catrin) about her experience transitioning into a caregiver role for her husband, Fred, who was living with bulbar onset ALS. Shortly after that, Fred passed away, and to mark the year of his passing, Cathy recently shared the following memory.

Here’s what she had to say…


“I have been saving this story for a while. Don’t know why but I feel it needs to be told. It is just a little story. No twists. No turns. No big reveals. But still. A story to be told.

Around this time last year, I ran the very quickest of errands. Fred was at a time of his illness we seldom left him alone. The kids and I we were a team in hanging with him. But we have lovely neighbors close and a prescription was needed, so just for the littlest of time, he was hanging alone. But that isn’t the story.

It was when I returned that the story began. As I’ve noted many times before, Fred went to too many concerts in the sixties. He always said that. Yet, on returning from my errand, I walked in to find Woodstock live in my home. It was 1969 again.

Jimi Hendrix was playing. So was Janis Joplin. Jefferson Airplane. Canned Heat. Still not sure why John Sebastian was there. Guess we will never know.

Those who knew Fred knew he never danced. Cotillion had ruined him. But there he was, dancing as best he could dance. Stomping his foot to Hendrix, occasionally playing air guitar. I dropped the prescription and immediately joined in.

For just a little time, the joy was back. 

Thank you Santana.

I still have Woodstock on the DVR. Haven’t played it since. But I tell this story because it is a testament to ALS. It is a story of hope, of perseverance, of determination. I was always so very proud of Fred, he was my very best friend. Yet it was in that moment I saw his deep abiding strength. I saw in that moment that though ALS had robbed him of his body, it would never steal his spirit or take away his soul. In the year that he has been gone, I write these little stories to keep his memory, my memories strong. I continue to walk the ALS walks. I continue to be loud.

ALS is a beast. We WILL defeat.”

#kickoutthejams #hopeisstrong

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