multiple

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – brain fog

Australian Jessica Anderson has been living with multiple sclerosis since she was 12 years old, and she says brain fog is the scariest symptom she experiences, especially not being able to gather and make sense of her own thoughts. During her worst moments, she can barely focus on a thought for more than 30 seconds. Listen to Jessica speak about her symptoms below.   You are now seeing brain fog Photographed by Sara Orme Inspired by Jessica Anderson’s invisible symptoms Jessica and New Zealand photographer Sara Orme worked together to visualize Jessica’s brain fog, and her video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

PatientsLikeMe member Tam builds first-ever ‘by patients, for patients’ health measure on the Open Research Exchange

Back in March last year, we shared on the blog about a new grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that would help support two patient-led projects on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) , a platform that brings patients and researchers together to develop the most effective tools for measuring disease. We were overwhelmed by the response from the community, and we’re excited to share that one of those projects is very close to being completed. Tam is living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and she’s been a PatientsLikeMe member for more than 4 years. After her diagnosis and experiences with her doctors not “getting” what pain means to her, Tam decided to create a new tool for anyone who might be experiencing chronic pain. Her idea is to build a measure that can help doctors better understand and communicate with patients about pain. Watch her video above to learn about her journey and listen to her explain her inspiration behind the new ORE project. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS and chronic pain.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – fatigue

“It’s like I’m deflated. I don’t feel like doing anything.” That’s how Darcy McCann says he feels on most days. He’s a young Australian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis [MS] at the age of 10, and his most debilitating symptom is fatigue, which comes and goes as a result of his nerves being constantly under siege.   You are now seeing fatigue Photographed by Juliet Taylor Inspired by Darcy McCann’s invisible symptoms Darcy worked with award-winning photographer Juliet Taylor to capture how he feels when enduring bouts of fatigue. His video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

The Patient Voice- MS member Jackie shares her story

  When Jackie was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis after a long, exhausting process, she struggled with a fear of the unknown and had no idea what she would be facing. But then she connected with the thousands of MS members on PatientsLikeMe. Jackie shared with the community about how she felt her current medication was making matters worse instead of better, and others responded with how they had the same experience. They told her about a new medication that seemed to be working for some of them. Jackie’s doctor prescribed it after she mentioned what others had shared, and she’s been having good luck with it ever since. Watch the video to see more of her journey.     Share this post on Twitter and help spread #dataforgood. And don’t forget to check out previous #dataforgood member videos.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – dizziness

Lyn Petruccelli is living with multiple sclerosis, and she fights random waves of vertigo and dizziness that can strike her at any moment. Sometimes, the feelings are so strong, she can’t even get out of bed. As Lyn says, “I can’t see it coming, and that makes it hard to fight.”1   You are now seeing dizziness Photographed by Louis Petruccelli Inspired by Lyn Petruccelli’s invisible symptoms Lyn’s husband Louis is an accomplished photographer, and they worked together to visually portray what it’s like to live with the possibility of dizziness every day. Their photograph is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS. 1 http://www.seeingms.com.au/ms-stories

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – spasticity

Australian comedian and public speaker Tim Ferguson said it the best – “Seeing [MS] is all about helping everybody, in society, right across the world, get their heads around this mysterious and sometimes scary condition.” He’s living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and he spoke about his spasticity in the video below.   You are now seeing spasticity Photographed by Matt Hoyle Inspired by Tim Ferguson’s invisible symptoms He worked with photographer Matt Hoyle to visualize his spasticity as part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign. It’s all about shining a light on the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition – check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

“I just kind of went on with life.” – PatientsLikeMe member Fred shares his experiences with MS

We’ve interviewed a lot of members on the blog over the years, and each has a different perspective on life with MS. Fred1118 has taken sharing about his life with MS to a whole new level, documenting his life in a personal photoblog and posting the pictures with the world online. Fred shared all about his experiences in a recent interview, everything from his handicap-accessible house to how physical therapy helps him stay mobile. Read his story below. What went through your mind when you were diagnosed with RRMS back in 1994? I didn’t really know too much about MS at the time. I’m not sure if I had even heard of it, so didn’t know what to think. The diagnosing neurologist said, “you have a mild case of MS.” I was young and carefree at the time and didn’t really worry about it too much. I kind of just went on with life. It looks like you’ve done a lot of work on your house to make it handicap accessible. What are some tips and tricks you can share with the community? I would say that everyone’s needs are different. It’s a good idea to have an occupational therapist that …

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Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – hot and cold

Dimitri is living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and he experiences dramatic changes in his body temperature every day. These swings can aggravate his other symptoms and leave him feeling suffocated. As he puts it, “a single bead of sweat can bring me to my knees.”   You are now seeing hot and cold Photographed by Jamie MacFayden Inspired by Dimitri’s invisible symptoms He worked with photographer Jamie MacFayden to portray his hot and cold sensations as part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which we also posted about on the blog in July (blurred vision) and August (pain). It’s all about raising awareness and showing everyone the invisible symptoms some people are living with because of their MS. Stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

MS members share about their PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ experiences

PatientsLikeMeInMotion™ is a way to celebrate our three star members (super health data donors) and sponsor them at events so that they can raise awareness for their condition. If you’re passionate about advocacy and you’re participating in a walk, run or other fundraiser on behalf of your condition, learn more and sign up right here.  We caught up with three MS community members who are active participants in PatientsLikeMeInMotion. They shared about the events they’ve been a part of over the years, why advocacy is important to them and several ways PatientsLikeMe has helped them manage their MS. Scroll down to read what they had to say.  Ajcoia  “Since being diagnosed in 2002, and after my sister was diagnosed in 2001, I have participated and captained every event the Greater Delaware Valley MS Society chapter has offered. This includes the one-day walks, MS150, Muckfest MS and Challenge Walk MS. My favorite event is the Challenge Walk MS, in which I have participated all 12 years. I have met so many wonderful and inspiring people through this event, which brings me back year after year. Advocacy is huge, because without voices out there speaking on our behalf, we would never get any funding …

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Every three minutes

That’s how often a person is diagnosed with blood cancer in the United States, according to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS). This means that 156,420 Americans will be diagnosed in 2014, and hundreds of thousands more worldwide. But that’s just the start of what everyone can learn during National Blood Cancer Awareness Month. Check out the Lymphoma Research Foundation’s (LRF) video below: Did you know there are actually three main types of blood cancer? Each affects a different kind of cell in your body and can vary greatly:1 Leukemia is found in your actual blood and bone marrow, and it causes abnormal white blood cells to form and disrupt the normal immune system. Lymphoma affects your lymph nodes and lymphatic organs, which are the parts of the immune system that remove excess fluid from the body and produce special white blood cells. Myeloma is the cancer that is limited to plasma cells, which are cells in your blood that help produce antibodies and fight disease. There are many subtypes of these three categories, including conditions like chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma, to name a few common ones. This month, get involved by participating in a Lymphomaton …

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