mental health

“I can see that there actually is help here.” – JustinSingleton shares his experiences with PTS

JustinSingleton is an Army veteran who recently joined PatientsLikeMe back in June, and he’s been exploring the veteran’s community ever since. This month, he wrote about his experiences in an interview, and below, you can read what he had to say about getting diagnosed with PTS, managing his triggers and the importance of connecting and sharing with fellow service members.  Can you give us a little background about your experience in the military? In 1998, I joined the Ohio Army National Guard as an Indirect Fire Infantryman – the guy that shoots the mortars out of a big tube. For six years I trained on a mortar gun, but after being called back into the Army (I left in 2004), I was assigned to an Infantry Reconnaissance platoon, and I had no idea what I was doing. Before heading to Iraq, we trained together as a platoon for six months – learning not only the trade, but to trust each other with our lives. It wasn’t until March 2006 that we arrived in Iraq, and I was assigned to the Anbar Province, which at the time was rated as the worst province of the nation. I was deployed in the …

“I can see that there actually is help here.” – JustinSingleton shares his experiences with PTS Read More »

The Patient Voice- PTS member David shares his story

Today is PTS Awareness Day, so we wanted you to meet PatientsLikeMe community member Cpl. David Jurado, who lives with post-traumatic stress (PTS). David developed PTS while serving in the military. After he retired, he continued to deal with daily symptoms, and he encourages members to connect with others on PatientsLikeMe, because “if you want to make changes for yourself and the PTS community, you’ve got to share your story. The same thing may be happening to them.” David is not alone – and neither are you. There are more than 1,000 vets living with PTS that are part of the community. We’ve heard members like David talk about how important it is for them to connect with people who ‘get it.’ Not a veteran living with PTS? You’re not alone either. With more than 8,000 PTS members, it’s easy for anyone with PTS to share their story and get support. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for PTS.

Patient, caregiver, wife and mother – Georgiapeach85 shares about her experiences with MS and her husband’s PTS

Ashleigh (Georgiapeach85) is a little bit different than your typical PatientsLikeMe member – not only is she living with multiple sclerosis, she also a caregiver for her husband Phil, who has been diagnosed with PTS. In her interview, Ashleigh shares her unique perspective gained from her role as a patient and caregiver, and how PatientsLikeMe has helped her to look for a person’s character, not their diagnosis. Read about her journey below. Hi Ashleigh! Tell us a little about yourself and your husband. Hi! I am 29 and my husband Phil is 33. We have been married for 9 and a half years, and we have a son who is almost two 🙂 . I was diagnosed with Relapsing Remitting MS in July 2009 just before my 24th birthday. My husband served in the Army Reserves for just over six years and did one tour in Afghanistan in 2002. I met him while he was going through his Med Board and discharge. We met while working at Best Buy – he was Loss Prevention, the ones in the yellow shirts up front – and I was a cashier and bought him a coke on his first day 🙂 . We dated …

Patient, caregiver, wife and mother – Georgiapeach85 shares about her experiences with MS and her husband’s PTS Read More »

“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Edward shares about living with schizoaffective disorder

Meet Edward, a member of the PatientsLikeMe mental health community. He’s been living with schizoaffective disorder since the late 1970s, and over the past 35 years, he’s experienced many symptoms, everything from paranoia and euphoria to insomnia and deep depression. Below, he uses his own words to take you on a journey through his life with schizoaffective disorder, including a detailed account of what happened when he stopped taking his medications and how he has learned to love God through loving others. How it all began: In my early twenty’s in 1977, I was doing GREAT in college, double majoring in Mathematics and Electrical Electronic Engineering and in the top 1% of my class when I started having problems with mental illness. My first symptom was an intense mental anguish as if something broke inside of my head. Then my sleep started to suffer and I would fall asleep in my college classes, which was not at all like me. Then I started having strong mood swings and I became very delusional. I experienced all of this without the use of any drugs or alcohol; in fact I have never used any street drugs or alcohol. Life became HELL and …

“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Edward shares about living with schizoaffective disorder Read More »

“I am slowly building my self-esteem “ – PatientsLikeMe member SuperChick shares about her journey with PTSD

PatientsLikeMe member SuperChick is a veteran living with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and her story is one of learning to cope with emotions and frustrations. She’s living proof that things can get better – she’s a loving mother of two, has a great husband and is managing several other mental health conditions. Below, she shared about the sexual abuse she experienced while serving in the military and explained how her previous husband physically assaulted her. Superchick also describes the symptoms of her PTSD and how the community on PatientsLikeMe has been “a huge help” to her. Read about her journey below. Note: SuperChick shares about her story of abuse, which may be triggering. Can you speak a little about your PTSD and what led to your diagnosis in 1986? I was originally diagnosed with PTSD after being raped while I was in the military. I believe I was more susceptible because I had been molested as a child and didn’t have good family support or dynamics. I worked through it, but was diagnosed again in 2007 after leaving a severely abusive marriage, where I was raped multiple times and choked at least twice. I was emotionally abused and didn’t …

“I am slowly building my self-esteem “ – PatientsLikeMe member SuperChick shares about her journey with PTSD Read More »

Depression Awareness Month- What does it feel like?

Here at PatientsLikeMe, there are thousands of people sharing their experiences with more than a dozen mental health conditions, including 15,000 patients who report major depressive disorder and 1,700 patients who report postpartum depression. What do they have to say? This word cloud has some of the most commonly used phrases on our mental health forum. It gives you a feel of the many emotions, concerns and thoughts that surround the topic of mental health. But the best way to increase awareness and knowledge, we believe, is to learn from real patients. To help show what it’s like to live with depression, we thought we’d share some of our members’ candid answers to the question, “What does your depression feel like?” “My last depressive state felt like I was in a well with no way to get out. I would be near the top, but oops….down I go. I truly felt that I would not be able to pull myself out of this one. I felt hopeless, worthless and so damn stupid, because I could not be like other people, or should say what I think are normal people.” “It feels like living in a glass box. You can see the rest of the world going about life, laughing, bustling …

Depression Awareness Month- What does it feel like? Read More »

It’s time to recognize mental illness in October

Think about this for a second; according to the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) 1 in 4 people, or 25% of American adults, will be diagnosed with a mental illness this year. On top of that, 20 percent of American children (1 in 5) will also be diagnosed. And so for 7 days, October 5th to 11th, we’ll be spreading the word for Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW). What exactly is a mental illness? According to NAMI, “A mental illness is a medical condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. [They] are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life.” There are many types of mental illnesses. The list includes conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar II, depression, schizophrenia and more. MIAW is about recognizing the effects of every condition and learning what it’s like to live day-to-day with a mental illness. This week, you can get involved by reading and sharing NAMI’s fact sheet on mental illness and using NAMI’s social media badges and images on Facebook, Twitter and other sites. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #MIAW14 if you …

It’s time to recognize mental illness in October Read More »

Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Dana

Just last month, we announced the coming together of our first-ever, patient-only Team of Advisors – a group of 14 PatientsLikeMe members that will give feedback on research initiatives and create new standards that will help all researchers understand how to better engage with patients like them. They’ve already met one another in person, and over the next 12 months, will give feedback to our own PatientsLikeMe Research Team. They’ll also be working together to develop and publish a guide that outlines standards for how researchers can meaningfully engage with patients throughout the entire research process. So where did we find our 2014 team? We posted an open call for applications in the forums, and were blown away by the response! The team includes veterans, nurses, social workers, academics and advocates; all living with different conditions. Over the coming months, we’d like to introduce you to each and every one of them in a new blog series: Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors. First up, Dana. About Dana (aka roulette67) Dana is a poet and screenplay writer living in New Jersey. She is very active in the Mental Health and Behavior forum. She is open to discussing the …

Getting to know our 2014 Team of Advisors – Dana Read More »

Dispelling the myths of schizophrenia

May is all about mental health awareness, and we’re continuing the trend by recognizing Schizophrenia Awareness Week (May 19 – 26). Schizophrenia is a chronic neurological condition that affects people’s sensory perceptions and sense of being, and it’s time to dispel the myths about the condition. Here are some myths and facts about schizophrenia from Northeast Ohio Medical University:1 Myth: Everyone who has schizophrenia knows that they have an illness. Fact:  Many people who have schizophrenia wait months, sometimes years, and suffer needlessly before a proper diagnosis is made and treatment begins. Myth: People with schizophrenia are dangerous. Fact: Studies indicate that people receiving treatment for schizophrenia are no more dangerous than the rest of the population. Myth: People with schizophrenia have split or multiple personalities. Fact: Schizophrenia is not a split personality disorder in any way. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) states that schizophrenia can cause extreme paranoia, along with mental changes like hearing voices others cannot, feeling very agitated or talking without making sense.2 Schizophrenia affects men and women equally, and although it’s normally diagnosed in adults over the age of 45, it is also seen in children. There is no cure for the condition, but antipsychotic drugs …

Dispelling the myths of schizophrenia Read More »

“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Eleanor writes about her journey with bipolar II: Part I

  We just posted that May is Mental Health Month, and so we wanted to help raise awareness by getting the patient perspective out there. PatientsLikeMe member Eleanor (redblack) first experienced bipolar II as a young woman, and she’s been managing her mental health with the help of her family and psychiatrist ever since. She shared about her journey in a three-part interview series, and we’ll be posting one part each month. In this first edition, Steubenville talked about how twinkling Christmas tree lights gave way to thoughts of loneliness, how life in a convent seemed like the right plan, and how she learned to recognize oncoming depression and mania. Read on for her full interview and keep an eye out for part two in June! Navigating the ups and downs of a diagnosis Although I was diagnosed with bipolar II well into adulthood, I feel I experienced it very early in life. On a particularly joyous Christmas Day when I was about twelve, as the dusk fell early on a typical western New York winter afternoon, I stood alone, gazing at the twinkling Christmas tree, and suddenly thought, “This is how it will always be: cold, and dark, and lonely.” …

“In my own words” – PatientsLikeMe member Eleanor writes about her journey with bipolar II: Part I Read More »

Scroll to Top