drug research

Marijuana/lung cancer: New reporting on potential risks/benefits of cannabis

Medical marijuana and cannabidiol (CBD) are getting a lot of media coverage — so what’s the latest, as it relates to lung cancer? See two recent high-profile articles that weigh the possible risks and benefits of cannabis for cancer and respiratory disease. And add your perspective. (Psst, checkout past PatientsLikeMe write-ups on medical marijuana and CBD for some background.) Risk factor or treatment? Earlier this year, U.S. News & World Report published an article called “Is Marijuana a Risk Factor or a Treatment Option for Lung Cancer?” reported by online CBD resource CAHI. Some key points? Marijuana smoke has many of the same toxins as cigarette smoke, so it could harm the lungs. But the doctors and researchers behind a 2017 report say they have not found conclusive evidence showing that smoking cannabis causes lung cancer (some doctors note that it’s difficult to study because many who’ve smoked marijuana have also smoked tobacco, and there are fewer people who are heavy or habitual cannabis users). However, if it turns out that smoking cannabis isn’t as bad for your health as people first thought, then it comes as no surprise to find out that you can easily buy it online on sites like firethc. The 2017 report did …

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Can ketamine help when antidepressants don’t? A closer look at the off-label drug that’s in the spotlight

You may have seen ketamine making headlines recently as a promising drug therapy for treatment-resistant depression, or “TRD.” (What’s TRD? Health care professionals define it as receiving at least two different antidepressants– for at least six weeks in a row, and at an adequate dosage – but experiencing less than a 50% improvement in depressive symptoms.) So, how does it work and what does the research show so far? Get the facts below — plus find some helpful insight on side effects and more from PatientsLikeMe members who have tried ketamine.   Let’s back up — what is ketamine? Ketamine has been around since the 1960s, and over the years it has been used as an anesthetic, treatment for some types of pain and a sedative in certain instances. It’s also been abused as a “party drug” due to its hallucinogenic high. But in the 2000s, researchers discovered that ketamine could also have rapid antidepressant effects — in as little as 24 hours — for those with TRD when administered in a small, single dose IV infusion. A number of clinical trials have since linked the effects of ketamine with improvement in symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD), as researchers continue to …

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MS research: What’s the latest?

Keeping tabs on the latest MS research isn’t always easy. So, our team of in-house health professionals took a closer look into some of the treatments in the research pipeline for people living with MS. Most of these treatments are in the final phase of clinical development — phase III clinical trials. In this phase, researchers compare the safety and effectiveness of the new treatment against the current standard treatment. Check out the roundup: Ozanimod – An oral treatment in phase III clinical trials with the potential to reduce relapses and prevent neurological damage. Ozanimod is reported to work like Gilenya (fingolimod) but with some potential for fewer side effects. A new drug application for ozanimod was submitted to the FDA in December 2017. This application is seeking approval for the use of this agent to treat relapsing multiple sclerosis. It is possible that an FDA decision could be made on this application in the second half of 2018. Ponesimod – An oral treatment in phase III clinical trials that prevents immune cells from damaging myelin that insulates nerve-cells in patients with MS. A new drug application for Ponesimod is possible within the next couple of years. Siponimod – Similar to Ozanimod, Siponimod is an oral treatment in phase III …

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