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Why these 5 Olympians with health conditions are #1 in our hearts

The 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games have come to a close. Did you happen to catch any of these 5 Olympians with health conditions (recently highlighted in The Mighty)? Their performances were inspiring — but their perspective on living with illness is what’s really golden. U.S. pairs figure skater Alexa Scimeca-Knierim developed a rare, life-threatening gastrointestinal disorder that caused episodes of vomiting and severe weight loss and has been hard to diagnose. She had three abdominal surgeries and has shown her scars on Instagram. After a long and painful recovery, Alexa was able to return to skating. “My whole outlook changed,” she told Team USA. “I was grateful to have the chance to fall instead of stressing out over falling or not. Was a fall as big of a deal as a drain getting pulled out of me? No, not at all. I was grateful.” In PyeongChang, Alexa and her husband/skating partner, Chris Knierim, took home the bronze medal in the figure skating team competition and placed 15th in the pairs competition. Alexa shared this photo with SELF for a video about her health problems and extraordinary road to the Olympics. American long-track speed skater Brittany Bowe sustained a concussion when she collided with another skater in 2016. Later, after fainting multiple …

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Visualizing insomnia

Jenna Martin is a photographer living with insomnia, and her sleeplessness is the inspiration behind much of her work. Much like the Seeing [MS] campaign, she tries to visualize her experiences through unique photographs that capture what it feels like to manage bouts of insomnia. Her photographs were recently featured in the Huffington Post, and as she told the organization, “on average, I only get a few hours of sleep every three days or so. During a bad bout, I’ll go close to five days with no sleep. When that happens, reality and the dream world become switched in a way: reality is very hazy and hard to remember, and any sleep I do get has dreams that are incredibly vivid. Everything starts to blend together; I’ll begin seeing things from a third person perspective and it’s hard to tell if I’m awake or if I’m dreaming.” Check out some of her pictures below, and see more of her work on her Facebook page. If you are living with insomnia, you’re not alone – over 2,200 people on PatientsLikeMe know what you’re going through. You can also visit the Sleep Issues forum to ask questions and learn more about sleep …

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