dizziness

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – balance

Describing her loss of stability and balance is difficult for Carol Cooke. One moment, she might be walking, and the next, she’ll fall to the ground. As she says, “I just want to get up and keep going,” but that’s not possible due to the symptoms of her multiple sclerosis (MS). Listen to Carol speak about her MS below: You are now seeing balance Photographed by Andreas Smetana Inspired by Carol Cooke’s invisible symptoms To help others understand this, she worked with photographer Andreas Smetana to portray her MS symptom in the picture above. Her video and picture are part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS.

Seeing [MS]: The invisible symptoms – dizziness

Lyn Petruccelli is living with multiple sclerosis, and she fights random waves of vertigo and dizziness that can strike her at any moment. Sometimes, the feelings are so strong, she can’t even get out of bed. As Lyn says, “I can’t see it coming, and that makes it hard to fight.”1   You are now seeing dizziness Photographed by Louis Petruccelli Inspired by Lyn Petruccelli’s invisible symptoms Lyn’s husband Louis is an accomplished photographer, and they worked together to visually portray what it’s like to live with the possibility of dizziness every day. Their photograph is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Australia’s (MSA) Seeing [MS] campaign, which is all about recognizing the invisible symptoms of MS and raising awareness for the neurological condition. Check out the previous pictures and stay tuned for more Seeing [MS] posts. Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS. 1 http://www.seeingms.com.au/ms-stories

What’s Your Experience with Cinarizina?

Cinarizina is an international brand of the prescription drug Cinnarizine, an antiemetic (anti-nausea) agent used for symptoms of inner ear disorders.  These symptoms may include vertigo, dizziness, tinnitus, nystagmus, nausea and vomiting. Cinarizina is also used to prevent motion sickness when taken in advance. If you’ve tried Cinarizina, we encourage you share your experiences at PatientsLikeMe, where more than 130,000 patients are using our unique data-sharing platform to review all types of treatments, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs and supplements.  Our treatment evaluations cover important data points such as dosage, effectiveness, side effects, cost and adherence so that you can easily share and compare experiences with others. Currently, one patient reports using Cinnarizine (the generic version of Cinarizina) to treat Meniere’s disease, which is characterized by a sudden onset of dizziness, low-frequency hearing loss, tinnitus and the sensation of fullness in the affected ear.  This patient, a 55-year-old male taking 25mg daily, reports no side effects but rates the effectiveness as non-existent. JOIN PATIENTSLIKEME TODAY What about you?  Have you taken Cinarizina or another brand of Cinnarizine?  Join PatientsLikeMe and add your experiences to our growing body of knowledge.  Then, stay to exchange advice and support, research common treatments and …

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Mental Health Awareness: What do you know about Mood Conditions?

In honor of this month’s Mental Illness Awareness Week, here’s a snapshot of what’s happening in our PatientsLikeMe Mood community. Launched in 2008, the community now has more than 18,000 patients. Below are some interesting facts about the community, so please read and share on! DID YOU ALSO KNOW… You can search for patients under 15+ diagnosis categories, including depression, bipolar, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, addiction to tobacco, addiction to alcohol, eating disorder and more. In a PatientsLikeMe research study recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, we revealed: 26% of responding mood community members agreed or strongly agreed that using the site had reduced thoughts about self harm 23% agreed they had decided to start therapy or counseling after interacting with others on the site 22% agreed they needed less inpatient care as a result of using PatientsLikeMe.  (See our “Patient Voice” report, video and member interview on inpatient therapy). Members’ experiences on the treatment Amitriptyline was used in an award-winning paper presented at Medicine 2.0 last year. How are our members treating their condition? Patients are using more than 1700 treatments, including prescription drugs, supplements, over-the-counter medications, life-style modifications, therapies, and more. The …

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