clinical trial

Health news: What’s making headlines in June

In case you missed it, check out this round up of some of the stories making headlines in June…   Parkinson’s disease: Apple Watch will now be able to monitor PD: Tech developers announced this month that the Apple Watch will now be able to track two common PD symptoms — tremors and dyskinesia — and map them out in graphs to help doctors (and patients) with PD monitoring. Fill me in. Study points to an “overlooked driver” of PD — Bacteriophages: What are bacteriophages or “phages”? Viruses that infect bacteria. New research shows that people with PD may have an overabundance of phages that kill “good” bacteria in the microbiome or gut, which could mean a new target for treating PD. More on the study. Lupus: How common are cognitive issues with lupus? Very. A doctor specializing in lupus research says nearly 40% of people with SLE have some level of cognitive impairment, such as trouble with attention, recall and concentration — so doctors should monitor it early and often. Read his Q&A. Lung cancer: Drug may replace chemo as initial treatment for many with NSCLC: New clinical trial results of the immunotherapy drug Keytruda show that it can be a more effective first treatment than chemotherapy for …

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PatientsLikeMe Launches Virtual Trial for ALS Patients

Study With Major Academic Medical Center to Evaluate the Potential of the Soy Peptide Lunasin to Reverse ALS Symptoms DURHAM, N.C., October 25, 2016—PatientsLikeMe and The Duke ALS Clinic have just completed enrollment in a virtual trial designed to test whether Lunasin, a peptide found in soy and some cereal grains, is helpful or harmful to patients living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The Lunasin Virtual Trial is the first study of the supplement in ALS patients and follows a review analyzing its potential to reverse ALS in ALSUntangled, a website for clinicians, patients and researchers to explore alternative treatments. Duke ALS Clinic Director and ALSUntangled Founder Richard Bedlack, MD, said he first heard about Lunasin’s potential from Mike McDuff, an ALS patient who took the supplement and experienced dramatic improvements in speech, swallowing and limb strength. “I reviewed Mike’s records and reports, and both his diagnosis and his improvements appeared real,” Bedlack said. “Of course, Mike might have an ALS mimic we don’t know how to test for, or his body may have found a way to beat ALS independent of treatment. But there is one more possibility: his Lunasin regimen might have actually worked. I was compelled to …

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A new precision medicine program for ALS patients

Last month, we talked about precision medicine and what it could mean for psychiatry. What’s precision medicine again? It’s a relatively new way of preventing and treating illnesses that takes into consideration people’s genetic makeup, environment and lifestyle.1 Today — just in time for ALS Awareness Month — we’re digging deeper into how it can be used to treat ALS. Our partners at the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) run the world’s first and largest precision medicine program in ALS, and here’s what it’s all about… How the program works The goal of ALS TDI’s program is to identify subgroups of ALS and possible treatments for them using a patient’s personal data, genomics and iPS cell technology … and then test the most effective treatments in a clinical trial.2 Check out the graphic below for an overview of what program participants can expect (tap to make the image larger).     If you’re living with ALS, head over to the forum and tell us what you think about using precision medicine in ALS care — would you participate in a program like ALSTDI’s? Add your voice and let’s learn more, together.   Share this post on Twitter and help spread the …

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Share Your Experiences with Euphytose

Available without a prescription in France, Euphytose is an herbal treatment for anxiety and depression that contains six plant extracts:  Hawthorn, Passionflower, Valerian, Ballota foetida, Cola nitida and Guarana (Paullinia cupana).  The latter is available in France as an over-the-counter anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) agent. Producing both sedative and stimulant effects, Euphytose combines traditional herbal remedies for anxiety with components that are thought to act on central benzodiazepine receptors.  It had been studied in one short, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 181 adults, with a statistically significant effect found for both reduction in symptoms and clinical response to Euphytose over placebo at the end of the trial.  In terms of safety, it was well-tolerated in the study with no difference in the number of adverse effects compared with placebo – and no serious adverse effects. At PatientsLikeMe, where more than 125,000 patients are sharing their experiences with all types of treatments, two patients report trying Euphytose.   The reported purposes were “Anxious mood,” “Panic disorder” and “Insomnia.”  Effectiveness was rated as either “Moderate” or “Slight,” while side effects included “Drowsiness” and “Problems concentrating.”  Here’s what one patient with panic disorder wrote on his Euphytose treatment evaluation:  Makes you a little drowsy, but helps in …

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