20 posts tagged “bipolar disorder”

Patients at work: Member Jenny launches online craft shop on Etsy

Posted November 8th, 2016 by

 

A few weeks ago, we kicked off a new blog series about patients who have started (or are working on launching) their own businesses. We’ll be featuring some enterprising members and learning more about how they manage their health and their career goals at the same time.

Today, we’d like introduce Jenny, (jhound), a member of the bipolar community who recently opened an online shop on Etsy called OldSchoolJenny. Jenny designs cards, scrapbooks, printable journal kits and other paper crafts with a vintage flair.

When we caught up with her, she shared about her diagnosis experience, her creative process and the health benefits of working with a passion: “Having my Etsy business gives me reason to keep going. It gives me a sense of purpose and it also brings me a lot of joy. “

Can you tell us a little about yourself and your diagnosis experience?

I grew up in Southern California in a foster home. I joined the military when I was 23 and met my husband who was also in the Navy in 2002. We lived in San Diego for the first five years of our marriage and moved to Michigan when we both got out of the service in 2006.

My first breakdown occurred in 2004 a year after we got married. I had a severe depression that involved some serious paranoid delusions (psychosis). I was hospitalized for over six weeks and then medically discharged. My initial diagnosis was major depressive disorder with psychotic features. Although I believe I had my first mania in 2005 while my husband was deployed, it wasn’t until I had a severe mania that included religious delusions in 2008 that I received my diagnosis of bipolar I with psychotic features.

I finished college after we moved to Michigan. I have a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in library and information science. At various points in my life I thought that I either wanted to be a counselor or a librarian but right now I am happy working on my Etsy business. My husband just graduated from Central Michigan University in May. We have recently relocated to Adrian, Michigan for his first engineering job.

We do not to have children at this point although it is possible that we may adopt in the future (you never know). However, we treat our dogs like our children. We have two basset hounds that we adore and who keep us very busy.

How did you first get into crafting and digital design? 

I have loved crafting all of my life. My favorite activities in school were always the artistic ones. I still look back with fondness on finger painting in preschool. As an adult I continued crafting when designing and constructing cards, especially for my husband, Chris.

I started a wedding scrapbook shortly after we got married but it took me several years to complete because I was such a perfectionist. It wasn’t until I bought a complete scrapbooking kit at a yard sale last summer that I was able to let go of the perfectionism and just let my creativity flow.

As for digital design, I had a copy of Photoshop that I used extensively while Chris was on deployment. Creating digital collages was one of my favorite ways to escape the loneliness I felt while he was away. Now I just love creating digital art journal pages for people to use in their crafts.

What are some of your favorite things you’ve made?

One of my most favorite things that I have made is a framed scrapbook page that I created for Chris’s graduation. It includes some of his graduation photos and some quotes from his family members about how proud of him they are. I think it came out very nice.

I also really like the Halloween junk journal that I made for my Etsy shop. It includes lots of vintage images that I found that all include black cats. I am attached to it because it is the first of hopefully many junk journals that I will be making.

Something else I made that I really like is a scrapbook that is “all about me.” I enjoyed documenting my life in this manner and I feel that it has become a keepsake for me.

What’s your creative process? What (or who) inspires you?

Inspiration strikes in different ways. Sometimes I am inspired by other people’s creations that I find on Etsy or on Pinterest. Other times I am inspired by positive affirmations and quotes. Sometimes I can just look through my materials and find a scrap of paper that inspires me. I am also inspired by vintage images.

What has been the most challenging part of starting your own business while living with bipolar?

I think it may be having my level of commitment waiver with my mood fluctuations. Having bad days when I feel uninspired and some days when I fear that having a personal business may be a mistake even though most days I feel grateful for the opportunity that it provides.

On your Etsy profile you say that your “biggest desire is to bring art into other peoples lives and to inspire others to live their best possible life.” Can you talk a little more about this?

My initial projects involved positive affirmations because they inspire me/help me to think more positively. I was hoping they would help others as well. One of my goals is to make a mental health journal and other tools to help people with mental illness. I have seen some examples of mood journals, etc. on Etsy, but I plan on making mine not only functional but artistic at the same time.

How does your art affect your own life and your condition?

I feel that my art really helps me and helps my condition. First it helps me to stay positive and gives me something productive to do. Having my Etsy business gives me a reason to keep going. It gives me a sense of purpose and it also brings me a lot of joy. So far I have been very lucky in that I haven’t had to deal with a serious depression since opening my shop. I am hoping that when it happens I will be able to rise above and keep operating my shop. If not, it is very simple to put my shop on vacation and take a break if needed.

Do you have any advice for others with chronic illnesses who want to start their own creative businesses?

My only advice is to go for it. Don’t put it off until everything is perfect. It will never be the perfect time to start a business. Etsy is very inexpensive and it’s OK to make mistakes. I made some mistakes when I first started but it was all easily remedied.

If you do decide to go for it, my other advice is to use social media for marketing. Don’t just share information about your product but share information about yourself, too. People want to know about the creator almost as much as they want to know about the product, especially when it comes to creative work.

 

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Patients at work: Member Ellen on launching her own clothing line

Posted October 25th, 2016 by

PatientsLikeMe members often talk about how they’re more than their diagnosis. They’re patients, but they’re also people, with complex lives, families, hobbies and careers.

Today, we’re kicking off a series of blogs about that last one — working with a chronic condition. We’ll be featuring some enterprising members who have started (or are working on) launching their own businesses, and learning more about how they manage their health and their career goals at the same time.

First up is Ellen (edayan), a member of the bipolar community who designs clothes for curvy women and runs an online dress shop called Tiger Lily. When we caught up with her, she shared about her passion for designing, how living with a mental illness affects her creative process, and her inspiring message to women:

“I want women to feel good about who they are right now so they don’t miss out on living a full life … Life is too short for feeling you’re not good enough.”

 

Tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into designing clothes?  

I first started sewing clothes for my daughter when she was a baby. She became quite the tomboy and I couldn’t even bribe her to wear the little dresses I designed for her, so I started selling them. I was so happy making clothes for children that I started my own children’s clothing and costume design business, but it was really more like a hobby than a career. The most popular thing I made was a retro boiled wool coat. Each one was different.

Tiger Lily’s message is “Love yourself — Now.” Can you talk a little about this and how you’re trying to inspire women through your clothes?

I gained a lot of weight on psychiatric medications for my bipolar disorder, which I’ve not been able to lose. I was so embarrassed and ashamed that I started hiding out at home. I didn’t want anyone I knew to see me. I didn’t appreciate the fact that I was still beautiful — just different. The world doesn’t treat you nicely if you have a mental illness or if you are not thin. I had two strikes against me, I thought, so I hid. During that time, I lost out on all kinds of important relationships and opportunities. Waiting until you can get yourself skinny isn’t a good reason to lock yourself away. I want women to feel good about who they are right now so they don’t miss out on living a full life. My message is to embrace your body, mind and spirit just the way you are. Life is too short for feeling you’re not good enough.

What’s your creative process like? What are some of your favorite pieces you’ve designed?

I actually like to sketch new designs when I am feeling a bit depressed. The depression slows me down and makes me more careful and practical. So, in a way, depression can be used to my benefit when it’s not too severe. After the depression cycle clears, I go back to the design and infuse it with colors and textures and some fun. Here is a sketch I made of a skirt and top that I constructed with some changes from the original idea. This ensemble will show on the runway in Phoenix Fashion Week in a couple of days! I’m really proud of it. Here are some of my original designs…

What has been the most challenging part of launching your own business, and what’s the most important thing you’ve learned along the way?

The most challenging part of starting my business is keeping the faith even when things don’t happen the way I’d like. I encourage myself to keep going and not get too frustrated with setbacks. Depression can be paralyzing at times. Usually, I can keep working through it, but sometimes I have to cross everything off my list for a couple of days until I’m well enough to function again. Having an online business is great because it’s flexible and I can “crash” when I need to and not lose customers!

The most important thing I’ve learned is to be authentic in everything I do. I don’t pretend to know everything about fashion, life or anything else. I am just me. But that is enough, and my customers want to connect with a real person. I guess the next most important thing is that I have a wonderful family and friends who are there waiting to help. I just have to ask.

You’ve said that designing clothes has been “such a big part of my recovery.” How has your art helped you manage your condition?

Designing and making clothing is fun, but it’s also challenging. It often distracts me from thinking about myself and the fact that I feel really, really bad inside a lot of the time. When I create something beautiful I get such a big thrill. It makes me happy for days. All of me goes into these designs — not just my happiness and imagination, but also my sorrows and tears.

When I get better at designing, I think my personality will become even more evident and people will see who I am in the colors and lines of my work. What I spend my time doing has always felt like the biggest part of my identity. Right now, I am a designer. I am not a mentally ill person, or a patient or a social services case number. I am a woman with talent and skills, and I am using these strengths to be successful. I accept that I experience severe emotional pain — it’s a fact of my life. I do everything I can to minimize that, but being creative isn’t just therapy or a way to “manage my condition.” Designing is a serious business for me — I am banking on it.

What are your future plans for Tiger Lily? Any career goals beyond this?

In the future, I would like more of the inventory in my shop to be my own work. I am especially interested in making one-of-a-kind items. So, I am planning to do more designing and less wholesale buying as time goes forward. I would like to open a brick-and-mortar store someday. I guess I’m trying to prove to myself that I can achieve success with this before investing in rent and utilities and store furniture, etc. I would like to continue donating to organizations that create new opportunities for people in recovery from mental illness and a host of other challenges. I’d like to create a fashion show of my own next year, and to keep developing new design skills.

But honestly, my goals are to grow a more courageous heart, to use my imagination in ways that light up the world, and to go as far as I can with what I’ve been given. I want to do all of these things despite the fact that I have a mental illness.

Do you have any advice for others with chronic illnesses who want to start their own businesses? 

Yes! Aim high. Don’t allow your fears to drown you. Set up all the safety nets you’ll need, but don’t think small because you have limits. You may discover that working hard on a project you believe in gives you energy, improves your mood, and helps you grow. If people tell you that your illness is the reason you can’t accomplish anything, find new people. Keep learning as much as you can and never, ever give up.

 

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