ALS symptoms

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Circulation issues & ALS

Do you have circulation issues like swelling (also called edema) or a burning (or cold) sensation in your legs and feet? How do you cope? From compression stockings to therapeutic massage and limiting salt intake, pALS are managing their circulation issues in some creative ways. Why do some people with ALS experience poor circulation? For many people living with ALS walking becomes difficult as their condition progresses. Lack of physical activity can make it difficult for the blood to reach the legs, feet, arms and hands, leading to poor circulation and swelling (some PatientsLikeMe members report swelling in their feet and hands). Swelling is also caused by dehydration, inflammation or consuming too much salt. Some symptoms include: Swelling or puffiness in legs, arms, hands or feet Stretched and/or shiny skin Skin that stays depressed after being pressed How pALS manage: If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms above, talk to your doctor. He or she may prescribe a diuretic (or water pills, to help rid your body of excess salt and water) but diuretics should be used with caution since many pALS are already dehydrated. Here are a few things some pALS are trying: Lymphatic massage (also called manual lymphatic drainage massage), a gentle type of massage that can help …

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Living with ALS: What We’ve Learned

Yesterday, our interview with ALS blogger and three-star member Rachael gave you a glimpse into what it’s like to live with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease).  Today we take a closer look using the data and experiences shared by our 4,844 ALS members, who comprise the world’s largest online ALS population. ALS, which stands for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a degenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Some of the most debilitating symptoms include progressive weakness, atrophy, fasciculations (muscle twitches), dysphagia (swallowing difficulty), and eventual paralysis of all respiratory function.  Other commonly reported symptoms are shown in the chart above. Given the severity of ALS symptoms, the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages two to five years from diagnosis, according the ALS Association (ALSA).  However, ALSA states, “The disease is variable, and many people live with quality for five years and more.”  Rachael, who is six years post-diagnosis and living a busy, active life thanks to assistive technology, is a perfect example. What does assistive technology entail?  For many ALS patients like Rachael, this involves the use of medical equipment to aid basic functions such as: Walking …

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