170 results for “"multiple sclerosis"”

Myths vs. facts about multiple sclerosis

Posted March 18th, 2015 by

Stop! What do you know about multiple sclerosis (MS)?

That’s the question we’re asking during MS Awareness Month. We’ve heard from many community members that people don’t always get what it’s like to live with MS, and that there’s wrong information out there. So as part of ongoing awareness efforts, we created shareable photos that will hopefully dispel some of the myths surrounding the neurological condition.

There are 13 shareable infographics in total – click here to view the gallery.  Don’t forget to use the #MSawareness hashtag when you post on your Facebook or Twitter. Let’s kick things into high gear and start dispelling myths about MS this month so that everyone is armed with better information all year round.

What’s the community saying?

“The stigma associated with MS far outweighs any benefits that come from awareness, from my personal experience. To be very honest, no one cares unless it happens to them, and people perceive being sick as a weakness”
-MS forum thread

“I have only been offended two times in 20 years by strangers. Family, now that’s a different story – stigma runs rampant there when it comes to MS.”
-MS forum thread

“A society that attaches a stigma to our disease when people fear it or don’t believe it exists, then discriminates against us instead of trying to imagine what our lives are like.”
-MS forum thread

Already a member? Awesome! Click on any of the links above and join the conversation. Not a member? No problem. Sign up for free here and then add your thoughts. Every voice is welcome.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS Awareness Month.


March is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month

Posted March 9th, 2015 by

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide, and in the United States alone, about 200 new people are diagnosed each week. Those are just a couple of the many reasons why the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America (MSAA) recognizes March as Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month.

What more do we know about MS? Doctors are unsure of the root cause of the condition, but women are twice as likely as men to develop MS. Additionally, the farther away from the equator you live, the greater likelihood you’ll experience MS – overall, your lifetime chance of developing MS is about 1 in 1,000.1

Did you know that there are four different types of MS? Each one affects people a little differently.

  • Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) affects the large majority (85 percent) of MS patients, and this type features clearly defined periods when symptoms get worse and activity decreases.
  • Primary-progressive MS (PPMS) causes a clear progression of symptoms and equally affects men and women.
  • Secondary-progressive (SPMS) is a form of PPMS which is initially diagnosed in only about 10 percent of patients.
  • Progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS) is found in only 5 percent of MS patients, but these people have both clear relapses and a clear progression of symptoms.

So now that you know more about MS, what can you do to help raise awareness? Here are just a few of the ways the MSAA recommends:

  • Read one of the MSAA’s publications, including the recently published annual MS Research Update, which includes the latest developments in MS treatments and research.
  • Find and attend one of the MSAA’s educational events for people with MS and their care partners.
  • Register for Swim for MS, which encourages volunteers to create their own swim challenge while recruiting online donations.
  • Check out the Australian MS Society’s Seeing [MS] campaign, which features MS patients and photographers working together to visualize the invisible symptoms of MS.
  • Share on social media using the #MSawareness hashtag and MSAA profile badge.

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with MS, check out our MS patient interviews and blog posts, or join more than 38,000 people with MS at PatientsLikeMe.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS Awareness Month.


1 http://www.healthline.com/health/multiple-sclerosis/facts-statistics-infographic