Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

“No oxygen.” PatientsLikeMe member Lori shares about life after surviving idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

It’s crazy to think how fast things can happen. The last time we talked with Lori, she was telling us about life on the lung transplant list and playing what she called “the waiting waltz.” And now – everything has changed. Just two weeks after we posted her third interview on the PatientsLikeMe blog in mid April, Lori got the call – they had a set of lungs for her. We caught up with Lori one more time, and fifteen weeks post transplant, she’s nothing but smiles. Check out what she had to share and don’t forget to follow Lori on her own blog called Reality Gasps. (Thank you Lori for being so open about your experiences with IPF!)     What was your reaction when you got ‘the call?’ You mention a whole range of emotions on your blog. The call took me completely by surprise. I’d been admitted to the hospital a week earlier because we just couldn’t meet my oxygen needs at home any more. I was literally 10-minutes away from starting a procedure to suppress my antibodies (to help increase my somewhat slim chances of finding a match) when the nurse walked in and told me …

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The Patient Voice- PF member Bryan shares his story

  Since we announced #dataforgood back in March, many PatientsLikeMe members have been sharing about why they donate their own health experiences. Becca (fibromyalgia) and Ed (Parkinson’s) already shared their stories, and now we’re hearing from Bryan, an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) member. Check out his video above. Miss Becca or Ed’s? Watch them here. Share this post on twitter and help spread #dataforgood.

“Gee, doc, ya think?” – Barbara speaks about her diagnosis and life with IPF

PatientsLikeMe member Barbara (CatLady51) recently shared about her journey with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in an interview with us, and she spoke about everything from the importance of taking ownership of managing her condition to how she hopes to “turn on the light bulb” by donating her personal health data. Read her full interview about living with IPF below. Some PF members report having difficulty finding a diagnosis – was this the case with you? What was your experience like?  My journey started back in 2005, when after my first chest cold that winter, I was left with severe coughing spells and shortness of breath. An earlier chest x-ray didn’t indicate any issues, so I was referred to a local community-based respirologist (what we call a pulmonologist here in Canada) who wasn’t concerned with my PFT results. I also had a complete cardiovascular workup, again with no alarming results. Then, in 2008, I had another chest cold. Growing up in a family of smokers and being the only non-smoker, I seemed to have managed to miss having chest colds, but 2005 and 2008 were definite exceptions. Again, a normal x-ray, another visit to the respirologist and another PFT that didn’t …

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Patients as Partners: The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale questionnaire results

Back at the beginning of April, we launched a new blog series called Patients as Partners that highlights the results and feedback PatientsLikeMe members give to questionnaires on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) platform. This time around, we’re sharing the results of the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS), a health measure that looks at how confident people are in managing their own conditions. More than 1,500 members from 9 different condition communities on PatientsLikeMe took part. They worked with our research partner Ken Wallston from Vanderbilt University to make the tool the best it can be. (Thank you to everyone that participated! This is your data doing good.) Check out the PMCSMS results and keep your eyes peeled for more ORE questionnaire results as we continue the series on the blog. What’s ORE all about again? PatientsLikeMe’s ORE platform gives patients the chance to not only check an answer box, but also share their feedback on each question in a researcher’s health measure. They can tell our research partners what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how relevant the overall tool is to their condition. It’s all about collaborating with patients as partners to create the most effective tools for measuring disease.

“Life is good” – PatientsLikeMe community member John_R speaks about his new life after being diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis

Several people in the PatientsLikeMe community use the phrase “new normal” after being diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis (PF), and PF member John_R doesn’t’ think his new normal is all bad. This month, he chatted with us about getting diagnosed with PF, bringing oxygen to the workplace, and how living with his Sweetie keeps him focused on the positive moments of his journey. You were recently diagnosed with PF in 2013 – can you tell us a little about your diagnosis experience? I was initially diagnosed with PF back in 2002 via a CAT scan with contrast. Around 2000, some haziness was seen on an x-ray, and my doctor recommended that I see a pulmonologist. I was getting ready to move to Texas, so I waited until I settled down and found a new GP. It was after my first physical with my new doctor that I was sent to see a pulmonologist. He sent me for a series of CAT scans from April of ‘02 to Jan ’03. The first scan indicated “There are several patchy areas of infiltrate identified peripherally in both lungs. These are identified at the anterior and lateral upper lobes as well as in both lower lobes. Mild patchy infiltrate …

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“Sleep has become a process.” Checking in with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patient and PatientsLikeMe member Lori

Some of you probably remember seeing her on the PatientsLikeMe blog before. Lori is living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and when we first chatted with her last July, she shared her experiences with blogging, the difficulty in finding the right diagnosis and how connecting with others has positively impacted her life. For our “Are You Sleeping?” initiative, the PatientsLikeMe community is taking a closer look at how sleep impacts our health, but also how our health affects sleep. Check out what Lori has to say about it in our follow-up interview with her. Don’t forget to check out Lori’s blog too, called Reality Gasps. She balances stories of her daily struggles with dashes of humor that can make anyone laugh. How have you been doing since the last time we talked? It looks like you said on your blog that you broke an ankle?!   I did break my ankle and had to have surgery to put in a plate and 8 screws! I had refilled the bubbler on my concentrator and didn’t realize I hadn’t screwed it back on just right. As a result, I wasn’t getting enough oxygen and when I stood up, my sats dropped quickly.  I collapsed …

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It’s Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day!

Do you know someone with pulmonary fibrosis? Thanks to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, today – Sept 7th – is dedicated to raising awareness about this condition and sharing the stories of patients living with PF. It’s Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, and we want to do our part to help raise awareness of this lung condition. Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) causes scarring and thickening in deep lung tissue over time. We recently announced that the PatientsLikeMe community has grown to include more than 1,000 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). IPF refers to cases where the cause of the condition is unknown, and it affects over 100,000 people in the United States alone.[1] Our collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim has made the acceleration to enhance our community for PF patients possible. So for Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Day, we’d love to share what we know about this condition, people’s experiences with it, and the stories behind the people living day in and day out with the disease. More and more IPF patients are sharing their real world experiences on PatientsLikeMe, monitoring their own health while connecting with others just like them. We’ve done a series of blog interviews with our members, including Lori, Kim, …

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PatientsLikeMe creates largest open registry of IPF patients in the world

Community One of Website’s Fastest Growing; Reveals Real-World Picture Of Daily Life With the Rare Lung Disease CAMBRIDGE, Mass.— August 22, 2013—In a few short months, PatientsLikeMe has created the largest open registry of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients online, and some of the most current patient-reported data on the disease. The information the community has shared is providing new clues about the condition and giving a rare look into what it is like to live daily with a disease that has no known cause or cure. According to the National Institutes of Health, pulmonary fibrosis causes scarring in deep lung tissue over time, making it harder for the lungs to move oxygen into the bloodstream. Cases where the cause of the disease is unknown are called IPF and usually affect middle-aged and older adults, more typically men, and an estimated 100,000 people in the United States. The company’s focus on IPF accelerated earlier this year when it announced a collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim to enhance its IPF patient community. Now more than 900 IPF patients use PatientsLikeMe to monitor their health and share information about their experiences with the condition. They can also connect with others like them and …

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“Retooling my attitude.” An interview with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patient & PatientsLikeMe member Lori

As part of our “Spotlighted Blogger” series, we’re talking with people who are sharing their personal health experiences to help raise awareness of disease and change healthcare for good. For our latest interview, we’re talking with Lori, an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patient who started blogging about her journey back in October 2011. Her blog is called Reality Gasps and she balances stories of her daily struggles with dashes of humor that can make anyone smile. If Lori sounds familiar to some of you, it’s because she’s also part of the PatientsLikeMe community.  She recently took some time to talk with us about why she started blogging, the difficulty in finding a diagnosis and how connecting with others has positively impacted her life. What made you decide to start blogging about your experience? What’s been the community response? When I was first diagnosed with IPF, I started researching online (like everyone else). The medical sites gave me an idea of what was happening to my body, but they said nothing about how to live with this disease – and when I really thought about it, that’s what I needed. So, I turned to blogs written by other patients and caregivers. They were …

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Keith & Sarah’s personal journey with rare lung disease. Part III, “Bonus round”

Over the last few months, Keith and Sarah have been sharing their journey with us. In this final interview of our three-part series, they talk about how he got on a transplant list and their “phones at the dinner table” policy. If you missed our first two interviews with Keith and Sarah, you can find them here. What did you have to do to get on a transplant list? Did you have to meet certain criteria? [Keith] The transplant assessment process is an intense and very time-consuming one. When you are contacted about being assessed for transplant, you are sent a large envelope listing out a weeks worth of testing, doctors visits, and appointments in Toronto at Toronto General Hospital. The hospital evaluates you on many things, and ultimately if you are deemed “healthy” enough (because you can actually be too sick, or too healthy) as a result of this testing, you are placed on the list. There were psychological assessments, nuclear cardiac testing, liver testing, kidney testing, pulmonary function testing, physical testing, blood tests (LOTS of blood tests) to name a few. Can you talk about your “phones at the dinner table” policy and how it changed? [Sarah] Phones …

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