17 posts in the category “Lupus”

Zoodles! Let’s dish on lupus/food + swap recipes

Posted 2 months ago by

If you’re living with lupus, have you found any particular foods that affect you and your condition — for better or worse?

Member Jeanette (JeanetteA6872), a member of the 2018 Team of Advisors who’s living with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), shares which ingredients she tries to include or avoid in her diet, plus three of her favorite recipes (psst—one involves zoodles!).

Food Q&A with Jeanette

Jeanette says she turned to dietary changes when she stopped taking Plaquenil due to severe side effects, including retina damage. “I had nothing to lose — I signed up for Tony Robbins’ Unleash the Power Within [a self-help program] that made me look at myself and my relationship with food differently,” she says. “I started logging my food intake for a few weeks on and off, I noticed how some of my favorite foods were causing me some issues ranging from stomach pains to full inflammation. That’s when I started paying close attention to what my body was telling me and I needed to do something about it.”

Here’s what else she shared with us in a recent Q&A. Everyone is different, so these foods and dietary changes may not affect you and your lupus the same way. Talk with your doctor or a registered dietitian about finding foods that work for you.

Have you noticed any specific ways that your diet or certain foods affect your symptoms?

I didn’t go on any specific diet at first, I started eliminating certain foods like sugar (which was causing major fatigue and pain), garlic (causing major inflammation in my knees), eggplants (fatigue and pain in my feet), bean sprouts (stomachaches) and alfalfa (full inflammation and full flare) — some of the known foods that lupus patients shouldn’t eat [learn more at lupus.org].

Then I noticed how meat was causing me fatigue and I noticed inflammation directly in my knees. I tried giving up red meat for two weeks, and I felt good and noticed a reduction of pain. Then I gave up chicken the following two weeks and felt even better. It was so amazing that I decided to give it up for good. After the first few months without meat, my doctor started noticing my blood work was improving drastically, so she began reducing my medications since I was no longer flaring or feeling pain. After a full year she reduced all of my medications to zero and even stopped my infusion.

I notice that if I eat too many potatoes like French fries, baked potatoes or mashed potatoes, as well as tomatoes, salsa, mushrooms and peppers, ice cream and cheese, I feel a little stiffness, so I know it’s too much. I really try to avoid processed and fried foods in general as I immediately notice stiffness.

I do still eat gluten and dairy products, just not every day. Everything in moderation works best, I’ve noticed. If something bothers me this week, I know not to repeat it.

Are there any foods that you try to eat often?

I don’t eat many of the same foods daily. I drink my shakes, but I like a variety of foods from pastas, salads, homemade cauliflower crust pizza, rice and beans, and I started eating fish again, so that’s more protein. There are meat substitutes like Gardein, Beyond Meat and black bean burgers that make great meals.

With the new eating style, I knew I needed to find some type of supplement for my vitamins and minerals because you get so many different vitamins from animal products and I wasn’t eating the same way as before. I tried Herbal Life, then Shakeology, then Modere, and none agreed with me because I have so many allergies. So I gave Isagenix one last try. It was perfect for me. Wow — my blood work started coming back so good, my doctor asked me what my secret was, since I [also] started working out and feeling even more amazing. I feel as if my life is back.

Do you have a few favorite recipes you’d like to share?

(Click on the links for a printable version of these recipes picked by Jeanette!)

Veggie scramble – This veggie-packed egg dish is scrambled in coconut oil and topped with avocado and tomato

Citrus fish tacos – Lettuce leaves serve as the “tacos” in this tilapia recipe, complete with mango salsa

Creamy zucchini pasta with shrimp – “Zoodles” (julienne-peeled zucchini “noodles”) and an avocado-basil “cream” sauce? Yum!

Which foods do you eat or avoid with your lupus in mind? Please add a comment below or join PatientsLikeMe to chime into this forum discussion!

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Health news: What’s making headlines in June

Posted 3 months ago by

In case you missed it, check out this round up of some of the stories making headlines in June…

 

Parkinson’s disease:
  • Apple Watch will now be able to monitor PD: Tech developers announced this month that the Apple Watch will now be able to track two common PD symptoms — tremors and dyskinesia — and map them out in graphs to help doctors (and patients) with PD monitoring. Fill me in.
  • Study points to an “overlooked driver” of PD — Bacteriophages: What are bacteriophages or “phages”? Viruses that infect bacteria. New research shows that people with PD may have an overabundance of phages that kill “good” bacteria in the microbiome or gut, which could mean a new target for treating PD. More on the study.
Lupus:
  • How common are cognitive issues with lupus? Very. A doctor specializing in lupus research says nearly 40% of people with SLE have some level of cognitive impairment, such as trouble with attention, recall and concentration — so doctors should monitor it early and often. Read his Q&A.
Lung cancer:
  • Drug may replace chemo as initial treatment for many with NSCLC: New clinical trial results of the immunotherapy drug Keytruda show that it can be a more effective first treatment than chemotherapy for many patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) — even those with low levels of the PD-L1 gene mutation. Tell me more.

 

MS:
  • VETS Act expands access to telehealth: Late last month, Congress passed the VETS Act, expanding access to telehealth for more than 20 million veterans, including 30,000 living with MS. Get the full story.
  • Now enrolling: Nationwide clinical trial: Researchers at John’s Hopkins University are seeking newly diagnosed or untreated patients living with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) to participate in a study to help inform treatment decisions. Learn more.

 

 

Mental Health:
  • Practices for overcoming trauma: Results from a new study found that women who combined meditation with aerobic exercise had far fewer trauma-related thoughts, and saw an uptick in feelings of self worth. Get the full story
  • When antidepressants won’t work: “I knew it wasn’t going to be a magical Cinderella transformation, but I definitely feel like a newer person.” Read one man’s experience with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) after first-line treatments didn’t work. More info.

 

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