11 posts from October, 2015

“I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress” – An interview with PTS and TBI member Trevor

Posted October 14th, 2015 by

Trevor Martin, a Veteran of the United States Army was deployed to Afghanistan twice from 2009 to 2012 and was later diagnosed with both a mild TBI and PTS. He joined PatientsLikeMe to connect with others living from these conditions. Our friends over at PatientsLikeMe sat down with Trevor to learn more about his life with PTS and TBI. Here’s what we learned….

Some people talk about PTSD ‘triggers.’  Do you know your triggers, or do symptoms happen unexpectedly?

I know some of my triggers, like trash on the side of the road. In Afghanistan they would put IEDs under piles of trash to hide them on the side of the road. So I know if I see that today, my heart starts to race, I get hyper-vigilant, and I start to think something’s about to happen that I need to avoid.

You mentioned that you feel a lot of pressure to be who you were before the war.  How are you different since returning home? 

I used to be the fun guy. All my friends would come to me and we’d go out and go shooting and joke around. It’s hard now because a lot of my friends don’t really understand. They don’t really know what I’ve gone through and what I’ve seen because it’s hard to talk about. The friends that I have told don’t really believe it.

What has it been like connecting with other vets on PatientsLikeMe?  

There are things you’ve done or seen that you will never forget. I don’t want anyone to ever imagine the things I see when I close my eyes at night. I wouldn’t wish that on anyone. It takes a lot for me to come out and talk about it. It’s been easier to connect with people online instead of in person. If I hadn’t found the site, I honestly don’t think I’d be here right now.

I haven’t been on this site for very long but man, I’m glad I found it. Since telling my story in a forum called “PTSD, my story and a cry for help” a couple months ago and reading all of your stories, I’m happy to say that I’ve made tremendous progress within myself. I’ve only had maybe 5 “freak outs” since joining. Whereas I was having 5 a day before. Half of the battle is knowing that you’re not alone in this, we’ve all done and seen different things but in reality, we’re all the same.

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World Mental Health Day 2015: What does dignity mean to YOU?

Posted October 9th, 2015 by

Mental illness affects people in every corner of our global community. Thousands with mental health conditions around the world can face discrimination, stigma, and emotional and physical abuse in mental health facilities. Additionally, many receive poor quality of care due to dilapidated facilities and lack of qualified health professionals.[1]

The theme for this year’s World Mental Health Day, observed annually on October 10th, and sponsored by the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH), is “Dignity in mental health” and focuses on how dignity can be provided in all aspects of mental health – from patient care to the attitudes of the general public.

The WFMH’s goal when it established World Mental Health Day in 1992 was public education at all levels of society. Today it’s become the largest and most widely promoted education and advocacy program of the WFMH.

How can you take part?  You can read and share their campaign materials. And on social media, they’ve been asking: What does dignity mean to YOU? #WMHDay. You can share your responses on their Facebook and Twitter. And don’t forget to log in to your PatientsLikeMe community to share there as well.

Defining dignity, together.


[1] http://www.who.int/mental_health/world-mental-health-day/2015/en/

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