9 posts from January, 2015

PatientsLikeMe member Tam builds first-ever ‘by patients, for patients’ health measure on the Open Research Exchange

Posted January 21st, 2015 by

Back in March last year, we shared on the blog about a new grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that would help support two patient-led projects on our Open Research Exchange (ORE) , a platform that brings patients and researchers together to develop the most effective tools for measuring disease. We were overwhelmed by the response from the community, and we’re excited to share that one of those projects is very close to being completed.

Tam is living with multiple sclerosis (MS), and she’s been a PatientsLikeMe member for more than 4 years. After her diagnosis and experiences with her doctors not “getting” what pain means to her, Tam decided to create a new tool for anyone who might be experiencing chronic pain. Her idea is to build a measure that can help doctors better understand and communicate with patients about pain.

Watch her video above to learn about her journey and listen to her explain her inspiration behind the new ORE project.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for MS and chronic pain.


What do you know about cervical cancer?

Posted January 20th, 2015 by

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, but it’s not just a month to learn more about cervical cancer, it’s about learning how to prevent it. Since the 1950s, there’s been in increased effort to raise awareness for prevention screening, and from 1955 to 1992, the cervical cancer incidence and death rates declined by 60 percent.1

But there’s still work to be done, as the NIH estimates that over 12,000 women will still be diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2015.1

Our own Priya Raja spoke about cervical cancer awareness on the blog about a year ago, and she stressed the importance of Pap smears and making them available to all women around the world. During January, the awareness focus will be on preventative screening as well as cervical cancer itself, because as Priya said, “being screened just once can reduce the likelihood of having cancer.”

You can learn more by checking out the National Cervical Cancer Coalition’s website and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s infographic on cervical cancer (featured to the right). And if you’ve been recently diagnosed with either HPV or cervical cancer, reach out to others like you in the PatientsLikeMe community.

Share this post on Twitter and help spread the word for cervical health.


1 http://report.nih.gov/nihfactsheets/viewfactsheet.aspx?csid=76