13 posts from March, 2014

Are you at risk? American Diabetes Association Alert Day

Posted March 25th, 2014 by

 

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), over 25 million people are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States, and 7 million aren’t even aware they have the condition. What’s more, 79 million people have prediabetes, a condition that can include several symptoms of diabetes.1

Do you know if you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes? Today is American Diabetes Association Alert Day, and it’s all about learning and recognizing risk factors. Take the ADA’s online diabetes risk test to learn if you’re at high risk – it’s fast, free and easy. The ADA’s official fact sheet is also full of useful information about diabetes and today’s activities, including Step Out walks and Alert Day Center education events. Visit the ADA’s website to find an event in your area.

Living with type 2 diabetes can involve many lifestyle changes, so if you’ve been diagnosed, are living with prediabetes or are at high risk, visit the PatientsLikeMe type 2 diabetes community to check in with your fellow patients and learn how they manage their condition. You can post questions in the forum and get answers from others living with diabetes, check treatment reports to see what people are taking to manage it, and track your own symptoms to get a better understanding of your own health.


1http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/alert-day/alert-day-2014-fact-sheet.pdf

 


What do you know about brain injuries?

Posted March 23rd, 2014 by

The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) explains it simply – a brain injury can happen anytime, anywhere, to anyone. That’s why March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. It’s time to learn more about traumatic injuries that can affect the brain and nervous system and share our experiences to increase awareness about everything from concussions to long-term disabilities.

If the skull gets hit hard enough, the brain can experience concussions, contusions and other types of traumatic conditions. It’s a little different for anoxic or hypoxic brain injuries – these happen when the brain receives too little oxygen, or none at all.

This month, there are plenty of ways to raise awareness about all types of brain injuries.  Reach out to your state’s BIAA affiliate to see if there are any local activities to participate in. The BIAA also has a great Brain Injury Awareness Month logo. Share it on Twitter and Facebook to spread the word on social.

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with a brain injury, you can visit the TBI community on PatientsLikeMe and share your experiences in the injuries and traumas forums. Over 900 TBI members are tracking their symptoms and sharing information about their treatments –join in today.